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Chronic Back Pain

Chronic back pain has far reaching effect on many physiological processes. Dr. Jimenez reveals topic and issues affecting his patients. Understanding the pain is critical to its treatment. So here we begin the process for our patients in the journey of recovery.

Just about everyone feels pain from time to time. When you cut your finger or pull a muscle, pain is your body’s way of telling you something is wrong. Once the injury heals, you stop hurting.

Chronic pain is different. Your body keeps hurting weeks, months, or even years after the injury. Doctors often define chronic pain as any pain that lasts for 3 to 6 months or more.

Chronic pain can have real effects on your day-to-day life and your mental health. But you and your doctor can work together to treat it.

Do call upon us to help you. We do understand the problem that should never be taken lightly.


Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures

Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures

Hip fractures are characterized as any type of break in the upper region of the femur or thigh bone. The variety of broken bones generally depends on the circumstances and the force applied to the bone, where some can be more common than others. Impacted femoral neck fractures are common hip fractures which occur in many older adults in the United States.

Anatomy of Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint which provides the femur the ability to bend and rotate at the pelvis. While any form of broken bones in the thigh bone or femur is considered a hip fracture, damage or injury to the socket, or acetabulum, itself is not considered a hip fracture. Below we will discuss hip fractures, particularly impacted femoral neck fractures, among others.

Femoral Neck Stress Fractures

Femoral Neck Stress Fractures

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint composed of the head of the thigh bone, or femur, which acts as the ball and fits into the round socket of the hip bone, or acetabulum. The neck of the femur is located under the ball of the hip joint. Stress fractures to the femoral neck can entirely or partially detach the femoral head from the rest of the femur.

Femoral neck stress fractures can be either displaced, where the bone is transferred out of its normal position, or non-displaced, where the bone remains stable. These fractures may interrupt blood flow to the portion of the broken bone. In recovery, the blood supply prevents severely displaced femoral neck stress fractures from healing correctly.

Causes and Symptoms of Femoral Neck Stress Fractures


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Osteitis Pubis Treatment

Osteitis Pubis Treatment

Pain along the pelvis and groin region is known as osteitis pubis. Osteitis pubis develops through the inflammation of the pubic symphysis, or the joints of the major pelvic bones found at the front of the pelvis.

The pubic symphysis is a thin joint which generally provides very minimal motion. The joint retains the two sides of the pelvis together in the front, where they connect at the sacrum in the rear side of the pelvis.

Osteitis Pubis Symptoms

Osteitis pubis is commonly characterized by pain in the front of the pelvis. Other causes of pelvic pain, such as a strain or a sprain, are frequently confused and diagnosed as osteitis pubis. While many patients report painful symptoms on one side, the pain typically occurs in the mid

Piriformis Syndrome Management

Piriformis Syndrome Management

Sciatica is a collection of symptoms in the low back, which radiate down one or both legs. Sciatica is generally caused by the compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve, the largest nerve in the human body. One of the most common health issues that cause sciatic nerve pain is called piriformis syndrome. The piriformis muscle stretches from the front of the sacrum, the triangle-shaped bone between the hipbones on the pelvis.

The piriformis muscle extends to the top of the femur around the sciatic nerve. The femur, as previously mentioned, is the large bone in the upper leg. The piriformis muscle functions by helping the thigh move from side to side. A piriformis muscle spasm, or any other type of injury and/or condition along the piriformis muscle, can place pressure on the sciatic nerve and cause pain and discomfort. The resu

Athletic Pubalgia Mechanism of Injury

Athletic Pubalgia Mechanism of Injury

Athletic pubalgia is a debilitating health issue which affects the groin. The injury commonly happens through sports that use sudden changes of direction or intense twisting motions. Also referred to as a sports hernia, athletic pubalgia is characterized as a tear or strain in any soft tissue (muscle, tendon, ligament) of the abdominal or lower abdomen region.

Physiology of Athletic Pubalgia

The soft tissues most often affected by athletic pubalgia are the oblique muscles found in the lower abdomen, especially in the tendons that attach the oblique muscles to the pubic bone. In many instances, the joints that connect the thigh muscles to the pubic bone, kno

Athletic Pubalgia and Adductor Strain

Athletic Pubalgia and Adductor Strain

Athletic pubalgia, also known as a hockey hernia, hockey groin, Gilmore’s Groin, sports hernia, or groin disruption, is a health issue of the pubic joint. It is a condition characterized by chronic groin pain in athletes and identified by a dilated ring of the inguinal canal. Soccer and ice hockey players are the athletes most commonly affected by athletic pubalgia, and both recreational and professional athletes can be impacted.

Athletic Pubalgia Symptoms

Symptoms of athletic pubalgia generally manifest as pain following physical activity, most frequently through hip extension, and twisting and turning movements. The painful symptoms usually radiate into the adductor mu

Evaluation of the Patient with Hip Pain

Evaluation of the Patient with Hip Pain

Hip pain is a well-known health issue which can be caused by a wide array of problems, however, the site of the patient’s hip pain can provide valuable information regarding the underlying cause of this common health issue. Pain on the inside of the hip or groin can be due to problems within the hip joint itself while pain on the outside of the hip, upper thigh and outer buttocks may be due to problems with the ligaments, tendons and muscles, among other soft tissues, surrounding the hip joint. Furthermore, hip pain can be due to other injuries and conditions, including back pain. 

Abstract

Hip pain is a common and disabling condition that affects patients of al

Classifying Spondylolisthesis

Classifying Spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis occurs when a vertebra of the spine slips forward over the vertebra below it. Spondylolisthesis can be categorized as: congenital spondylolisthesis, which means the disorder is present at birth; isthmic spondylolisthesis, which occurs when a defect occurs in a supportive vertebral structure of the spine; and degenerative spondylolisthesis, which is more common and is frequently associated with degenerative disc disease, or DDD, where the intervertebral discs lose hydration with age.

Development of Spondylolisthesis

The spinal column is exposed to directional pressures while it carries, absorbs, and also distributes most of the fat of the body throughout physical activities and during rest. To put it differently, while the spine is consuming and carrying body fat,

Scoliosis Clinical Presentation

Scoliosis Clinical Presentation

Scoliosis is a medical condition where an individual’s spine is diagnosed with an abnormal curve. The natural curvature of the spine is generally “S” shaped when viewed laterally, or from the side, and it should appear straight when viewed from the front or back. In many instances, the abnormal curvature of the spine with scoliosis increases over time, while in others, it remains the same. Scoliosis can cause a variety of symptoms.

Scoliosis affects approximately 3 percent of the population. The cause of most instances is unknown, however, it is believed to involve a mixture of environmental and genetic variables. Risk factors include having relatives with the same problem. It may also develop due to other health issues, such as Marfan syndrome, cerebral palsy, muscle spasms, and tumors like neurofibromatosis.  Scoliosis commonly develops

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Cervical Spine

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Cervical Spine

Rheumatoid arthritis, or RA, is a chronic health issue which affects approximately 1 percent of the population in the United States. RA is an autoimmune disorder that causes the inflammation and degeneration of the synovial tissue, specific cells and tissue which form the lining of the joints within the human body. Rheumatoid arthritis may and generally does affect every joint in the body, especially as people get older. RA commonly develops in the joints of the hands and feet, severely restricting an individual’s ability to move, however, those with significant disease in the spine are at risk of damage like paraplegia. Rheumatoid arthritis of the spine is frequent in three areas, causing different clinical problems.

The first is basilar invagination, also referred to as cranial settling or superior migration of the odontoid, a

Vertebral Fracture Diagnosis Imaging Studies

Vertebral Fracture Diagnosis Imaging Studies

A vertebral fracture is a common health issue which can often cause bone fragments to damage the spinal chord and nerve roots. Broken bones can occur due to trauma or injury from automobile accidents, slip-and-fall accidents, or sports injuries, among other causes. Depending on how severe the vertebral fracture is, individuals may have difficulty performing everyday activities. The purpose of the article below is to demonstrate and discuss vertebral fracture diagnosis imaging studies and their results.

Practice Essentials

Vertebral fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine are usually associated with major trauma and can cause spinal cord damage that results in neural deficits. Each vertebral region has unique anatomical and functional features that result in specific injuries.

Spine Trauma Imaging Diagnostics Evaluation

Spine Trauma Imaging Diagnostics Evaluation

Imaging diagnostics are an essential element in the evaluation of spine trauma. Over the last few decades, the rapid evolution of imaging technology has tremendously changed the assessment and treatment of spinal injuries. Imaging diagnostics utilizing CT and MRI, among others, are helpful in the acute and the chronic settings. Spinal cord and soft-tissue injuries are best evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, whereas computed tomography scanning, or CT scans, best evaluate spinal trauma or spine fracture. The purpose of the article below is to demonstrate the significance of imaging diagnostics in spine trauma.

Cervical Spine Fracture Evaluation

Practice Essentials

Approximately 5-10% of unconscious patients who

Imaging Diagnostics of Abnormalities of the Spine

Imaging Diagnostics of Abnormalities of the Spine

Imaging diagnostics of the spine consist from radiographies to computed tomography scanning, or CT scans, in which CT is utilized in conjunction with myelography and most recently with magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI. These imaging diagnostics are being used to determine the presence of abnormalities of the spine, scoliosis, spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. The following article describes various imaging modalities and their application in the evaluation of common spinal disorders described.

Imaging the Spine in Arthritis: a Pictorial Review

Imaging the Spine in Arthritis: a Pictorial Review

Many types of arthritis can affect the structure and function of the muscles, bones and/or joints, causing symptoms such as, pain, stiffness and swelling. While arthritis can commonly affect the hands, wrists, elbows, hips, knees and feet, it can also affect the facet joints found along the length of the spine. One of the most well-known types of arthritis, known as rheumatoid arthritis or RA, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints which occurs when the human body’s own immune system attacks the

The Role of Emergency Radiology in Spinal Trauma

The Role of Emergency Radiology in Spinal Trauma

Spinal trauma consists of spine fractures, or spinal fractures, and spinal cord injuries. Approximately 12,000 spinal trauma cases are reported in the United States every year. While the most prevalent causes of spinal cord injuries and spine fractures are automobile accidents and falls, spinal trauma can also be attributed to assault, sports injuries, and work-related accidents. Diagnosis of spinal trauma includes imaging and assessment of nerve function, such as reflex, motor, and sensation. The following article discusses the role of emergency radiology in spinal trauma. Chiropractic care can help provide diagnostic evaluations for spinal trauma.

Abstract

Spinal trauma is

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