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Spine Care

The spine is designed with three natural curves; the neck curvature or cervical spine, the upper back curvature or thoracic spine, and the lower back curvature or lumbar spine, all which come together to form a slight “S” shape when viewed from the side. The spine is an essential structure as it helps support the upright posture of humans, it provides the body with flexibility to move and it plays the crucial role of protecting the spinal cord. Spinal health is important in order to ensure the body is functioning to its fullest capacity. Dr. Alex Jimenez strongly indicates across his collection of articles on spine care, how to properly support a healthy spine. For more information, please feel free to contact us at (915) 850-0900 or text to call Dr. Jimenez personally at (915) 540-8444.


Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures

Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures

Hip fractures are characterized as any type of break in the upper region of the femur or thigh bone. The variety of broken bones generally depends on the circumstances and the force applied to the bone, where some can be more common than others. Impacted femoral neck fractures are common hip fractures which occur in many older adults in the United States.

Anatomy of Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint which provides the femur the ability to bend and rotate at the pelvis. While any form of broken bones in the thigh bone or femur is considered a hip fracture, damage or injury to the socket, or acetabulum, itself is not considered a hip fracture. Below we will discuss hip fractures, particularly impacted femoral neck fractures, among others.

Femoral Neck Stress Fractures

Femoral Neck Stress Fractures

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint composed of the head of the thigh bone, or femur, which acts as the ball and fits into the round socket of the hip bone, or acetabulum. The neck of the femur is located under the ball of the hip joint. Stress fractures to the femoral neck can entirely or partially detach the femoral head from the rest of the femur.

Femoral neck stress fractures can be either displaced, where the bone is transferred out of its normal position, or non-displaced, where the bone remains stable. These fractures may interrupt blood flow to the portion of the broken bone. In recovery, the blood supply prevents severely displaced femoral neck stress fractures from healing correctly.

Causes and Symptoms of Femoral Neck Stress Fractures


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Osteitis Pubis Treatment

Osteitis Pubis Treatment

Pain along the pelvis and groin region is known as osteitis pubis. Osteitis pubis develops through the inflammation of the pubic symphysis, or the joints of the major pelvic bones found at the front of the pelvis.

The pubic symphysis is a thin joint which generally provides very minimal motion. The joint retains the two sides of the pelvis together in the front, where they connect at the sacrum in the rear side of the pelvis.

Osteitis Pubis Symptoms

Osteitis pubis is commonly characterized by pain in the front of the pelvis. Other causes of pelvic pain, such as a strain or a sprain, are frequently confused and diagnosed as osteitis pubis. While many patients report painful symptoms on one side, the pain typically occurs in the mid

Piriformis Syndrome Management

Piriformis Syndrome Management

Sciatica is a collection of symptoms in the low back, which radiate down one or both legs. Sciatica is generally caused by the compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve, the largest nerve in the human body. One of the most common health issues that cause sciatic nerve pain is called piriformis syndrome. The piriformis muscle stretches from the front of the sacrum, the triangle-shaped bone between the hipbones on the pelvis.

The piriformis muscle extends to the top of the femur around the sciatic nerve. The femur, as previously mentioned, is the large bone in the upper leg. The piriformis muscle functions by helping the thigh move from side to side. A piriformis muscle spasm, or any other type of injury and/or condition along the piriformis muscle, can place pressure on the sciatic nerve and cause pain and discomfort. The resu

Understanding Trochanteric Bursitis

Understanding Trochanteric Bursitis

The hips are some of the most flexible structures in the human body, providing the necessary amount of strength and stability needed to support the human body when walking, running or jumping. However, the hip joint can also be vulnerable to damage or injury, resulting in debilitating hip pain. Trochanteric bursitis is hip pain brought on by the inflammation of the fluid-filled sac, or bursa, found on the outer border of the hip.

Trochanteric Bursitis Overview

There are about 160 bursae located around the entire body. Bursae act as a sort of “cushion” between soft tissues and bones, preventing bones from rubbing against tendons, ligaments, and muscles. Trochanteric bursitis can affect any of the bursae inside the human body. Trochanteric bursitis affects the outer part of the thighbone, or the femur, at the edge of the hip. This bony point is best known as th

Athletic Pubalgia Mechanism of Injury

Athletic Pubalgia Mechanism of Injury

Athletic pubalgia is a debilitating health issue which affects the groin. The injury commonly happens through sports that use sudden changes of direction or intense twisting motions. Also referred to as a sports hernia, athletic pubalgia is characterized as a tear or strain in any soft tissue (muscle, tendon, ligament) of the abdominal or lower abdomen region.

Physiology of Athletic Pubalgia

The soft tissues most often affected by athletic pubalgia are the oblique muscles found in the lower abdomen, especially in the tendons that attach the oblique muscles to the pubic bone. In many instances, the joints that connect the thigh muscles to the pubic bone, kno

Athletic Pubalgia and Adductor Strain

Athletic Pubalgia and Adductor Strain

Athletic pubalgia, also known as a hockey hernia, hockey groin, Gilmore’s Groin, sports hernia, or groin disruption, is a health issue of the pubic joint. It is a condition characterized by chronic groin pain in athletes and identified by a dilated ring of the inguinal canal. Soccer and ice hockey players are the athletes most commonly affected by athletic pubalgia, and both recreational and professional athletes can be impacted.

Athletic Pubalgia Symptoms

Symptoms of athletic pubalgia generally manifest as pain following physical activity, most frequently through hip extension, and twisting and turning movements. The painful symptoms usually radiate into the adductor mu

Rectus Femoris Strain Management

Rectus Femoris Strain Management

The rectus femoris muscle attaches to the pelvis and just below the knee as it is one of four muscles found at the front part of the thigh. It functions by extending the knee and flexing the hip. The rectus femoris muscle is made up of fibers which adapt to quick action. Rectus femoris muscle strain is caused by forceful movements, such as kicking a ball or when beginning to sprint, and it is particularly vulnerable to stress and pressure.

Painful symptoms generally manifest at the top of the thigh after the rectus femoris muscle suffers a strain or tear. In severe cases, the health issue may even become noticeable if the tissue is completely ruptured. Fortunately, complete tears are rare. Healthcare professionals will commonly use an MRI scan to diagnose the extent of the sports injury. Proper diagnosis and treatment are ess

Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip

The hip is commonly described as a “ball-and-socket” type joint. In a healthy hip, the ball at the top end of the thighbone, or femur, should fit firmly into the socket, which is part of the large pelvis bone. In babies and children with developmental dysplasia, or dislocation, of the hip, abbreviated as DDH, the hip joint may not have formed normally. As a result, the ball of the femur might easily dislocate and become loose from the socket.

Although DDH is often present from birth, it could also develop during a child’s first year of life. Recent research studies have demonstrated that infants whose thighs are swaddled closely with the hips and knees straight are at a higher risk for developing DDH. Because swaddling has become increasingly popular, it is essential for parents to understand how to swaddle their babies safely, and the

Evaluation of the Patient with Hip Pain

Evaluation of the Patient with Hip Pain

Hip pain is a well-known health issue which can be caused by a wide array of problems, however, the site of the patient’s hip pain can provide valuable information regarding the underlying cause of this common health issue. Pain on the inside of the hip or groin can be due to problems within the hip joint itself while pain on the outside of the hip, upper thigh and outer buttocks may be due to problems with the ligaments, tendons and muscles, among other soft tissues, surrounding the hip joint. Furthermore, hip pain can be due to other injuries and conditions, including back pain. 

Abstract

Hip pain is a common and disabling condition that affects patients of al

Achondroplasia Clinical Presentation

Achondroplasia Clinical Presentation

Achondroplasia is a genetic disorder that leads to dwarfism. In those with the condition, the legs and arms are short, while the chest is generally of regular length. Those affected have an average adult height of 131 centimetres (4 ft 4 in) for males and 123 centimetres (4 feet ) for females. Other features include a prominent forehead and an enlarged head. Intelligence is typically considered normal in people with achondroplasia. The condition affects approximately 1 in 27,500 individuals.

Diagnosis for Achondroplasia

Achondroplasia is the result of a mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene. This occurs during early development as a new mutation. It is also inherited from the parents in an autosomal dominant way. Those with two affected genes do not survive.

Classifying Spondylolisthesis

Classifying Spondylolisthesis

Spondylolisthesis occurs when a vertebra of the spine slips forward over the vertebra below it. Spondylolisthesis can be categorized as: congenital spondylolisthesis, which means the disorder is present at birth; isthmic spondylolisthesis, which occurs when a defect occurs in a supportive vertebral structure of the spine; and degenerative spondylolisthesis, which is more common and is frequently associated with degenerative disc disease, or DDD, where the intervertebral discs lose hydration with age.

Development of Spondylolisthesis

The spinal column is exposed to directional pressures while it carries, absorbs, and also distributes most of the fat of the body throughout physical activities and during rest. To put it differently, while the spine is consuming and carrying body fat,

Scoliosis Clinical Presentation

Scoliosis Clinical Presentation

Scoliosis is a medical condition where an individual’s spine is diagnosed with an abnormal curve. The natural curvature of the spine is generally “S” shaped when viewed laterally, or from the side, and it should appear straight when viewed from the front or back. In many instances, the abnormal curvature of the spine with scoliosis increases over time, while in others, it remains the same. Scoliosis can cause a variety of symptoms.

Scoliosis affects approximately 3 percent of the population. The cause of most instances is unknown, however, it is believed to involve a mixture of environmental and genetic variables. Risk factors include having relatives with the same problem. It may also develop due to other health issues, such as Marfan syndrome, cerebral palsy, muscle spasms, and tumors like neurofibromatosis.  Scoliosis commonly develops

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