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Research Studies

Research Studies: Dr. Alex Jimenez has compiled study and research projects that are pertinent to the science and art of chiropractic medicine. The subsets can be classified as following: Case Study, Case Series, Cross-Sectional, Cohort, Case Control and Randomized Control Trials.  Each subset of study profiles have their merits and scientific significance.  It is our intention to bring clarity to present day research models.  We will discuss and present significant clinical interpretations that may serve out patients well.  Great care in selecting appropriate and well documented models have been enforced in our blog.  We gladly will listen and heed comments on the discussed subject matters presented. For Answers to any questions you may have please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900


The Basic Science of Human Knee Menisci Structure, Composition, and Function

The Basic Science of Human Knee Menisci Structure, Composition, and Function

The knee is one of the most complex joints in the human body, consisting of the thigh bone, or femur, the shin bone, or tibia, and the kneecap, or patella, among other soft tissues. Tendons connect the bones to the muscles while ligaments connect the bones of the knee...
Evaluation of Patients Presenting with Knee Pain: Part II. Differential Diagnosis

Evaluation of Patients Presenting with Knee Pain: Part II. Differential Diagnosis

The knee is the largest joint in the human body, where the complex structures of the lower and upper legs come together. Consisting of three bones, the femur, the tibia, and the patella which are surrounded by a variety of soft tissues, including cartilage, tendons...
Evaluation of Patients Presenting with Knee Pain: Part I. History, Physical Examination, Radiographs, and Laboratory Tests

Evaluation of Patients Presenting with Knee Pain: Part I. History, Physical Examination, Radiographs, and Laboratory Tests

Knee pain is a common health issue among athletes and the general population alike. Although symptoms of knee pain can be debilitating and frustrating, knee pain is often a very treatable health issue. The knee is a complex structure made up of three bones: the lower section of the thighbone, the upper region of the shinbone, and the kneecap. 

Powerful soft tissues, such as the tendons and ligaments of the knee as well as the cartilage beneath the kneecap and between the bones, hold these structures together in order to stabilize and support the knee. However, a variety of injuries and/or conditions can ultimately lead to knee pain. The purpose of the article below is to evaluate patients with knee pain.

Abstract


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Bisphosphonates: Mechanism of Action and Role in Clinical Practice

Bisphosphonates: Mechanism of Action and Role in Clinical Practice

Bisphosphonates are a type of drug/medication which blocks the loss of bone density to treat osteoporosis-related ailments. They are most frequently prescribed for the treatment of osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates have two phosphonate groups. Evidence demonstrates that they reduce the probability of fractures in post-menopausal women with osteoporosis.

Bone tissue undergoes continuous remodeling that is stored to provide equilibrium, or homeostasis, through osteoblasts generating bone and osteoclasts ruining bone. Bisphosphonates inhibit bone digestion by encouraging osteoclasts to undergo apoptosis or cell death.

The uses of bisphosphonates include the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, Paget’s disease of bone, bone metastasis (with or without hypercal

What is Metastatic Bone Disease?

What is Metastatic Bone Disease?

Cancer which develops in specific organs of the human body, including the lungs, breast, or prostate, among others, can sometimes spread into the bone, causing what is known as metastatic bone disease, or MBD. Approximately more than 1.2 million new cancer cases are diagnosed every year, where about 50 percent can spread, or metastasize, to the bones.

Through medical advancements, patients diagnosed with several different types of cancers, especially lung, breast, and prostate cancer, can live longer. However, primary cancers in more patients go through bone metastases, where they disperse to the bone. Meanwhile, other types of cancers do not disperse so easily to the bone. The most common cancers which develop in the organs and spread to the bones include:

Femoroacetabular Impingement

Femoroacetabular Impingement

Femoroacetabular impingement, or FAI, is a medical state where additional bone develops in a single or multiple of the bones which make up the hip joint, giving the bones an irregular form. As a result, the bones may rub against each other since they do not fit together properly. This friction can ultimately harm the joint, causing pain, discomfort and limiting movement.

Anatomy

The hip is commonly characterized as a ball-and-socket joint. The acetabulum, which is part of the large pelvis bone, forms the socket of the joint. The ball of the joint is the femoral head, that is the upper end of the thighbone or femur. A type of soft tissue, known as articular cartilage, covers the surface of the ball-and-socket hip joint.

Bisphosphonate-Related Proximal Femoral Fractures

Bisphosphonate-Related Proximal Femoral Fractures

With the increase of osteoporosis in older adults, the diagnosis and treatment of abnormal hip fractures, such as bisphosphonate-related proximal femoral fractures, has become more important. According to Dr. Edward J. Fox, MD, obesity is often managed through the long-term use of bisphosphonate treatment, which can inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone regeneration. Over the prolonged utilization of bisphosphonate, patients  may develop atypical proximal femoral fractures.

Understanding Atypical Femur Fractures

Atypical femur fractures are characterized as stress fractures which commonly occur in the proximal one-third of the diaphyseal bone, although

Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures

Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures

Hip fractures are characterized as any type of break in the upper region of the femur or thigh bone. The variety of broken bones generally depends on the circumstances and the force applied to the bone, where some can be more common than others. Impacted femoral neck fractures are common hip fractures which occur in many older adults in the United States.

Anatomy of Impacted Femoral Neck Fractures

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint which provides the femur the ability to bend and rotate at the pelvis. While any form of broken bones in the thigh bone or femur is considered a hip fracture, damage or injury to the socket, or acetabulum, itself is not considered a hip fracture. Below we will discuss hip fractures, particularly impacted femoral neck fractures, among others.

Femoral Neck Stress Fractures

Femoral Neck Stress Fractures

The hip is a ball-and-socket joint composed of the head of the thigh bone, or femur, which acts as the ball and fits into the round socket of the hip bone, or acetabulum. The neck of the femur is located under the ball of the hip joint. Stress fractures to the femoral neck can entirely or partially detach the femoral head from the rest of the femur.

Femoral neck stress fractures can be either displaced, where the bone is transferred out of its normal position, or non-displaced, where the bone remains stable. These fractures may interrupt blood flow to the portion of the broken bone. In recovery, the blood supply prevents severely displaced femoral neck stress fractures from healing correctly.

Causes and Symptoms of Femoral Neck Stress Fractures


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