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Wellness

Wellness: A key factor to spine or back pain conditions is staying healthy. Overall wellness involves a balanced diet, appropriate exercise, physical activity, restful sleep and a healthy lifestyle. The term has been applied in many ways. But overall the definition is as follows. It is a conscious, self-directed and evolving process of achieving full potential. It is multidimensional, bringing together lifestyle both mental/spiritual and the environment in which one lives. It is positive and affirms that which we do is in fact correct. It is an active process where people become aware and make choices towards a more successful lifestyle. This includes how a person contributes to their environment/community. They aim to build healthier living spaces and social networks. It helps in creating a person’s belief systems, values, and a positive world perspective. Along with this comes the benefits of regular exercise, healthy diet, as well as personal self-care and knowing when to seek medical attention. Dr. Jimenez’ message is to work towards being fit, being healthy, and staying aware with our collection of articles, blogs and videos. For Answers to any questions you may have please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 


Functional Endocrinology: Stomach Digestive Disorders

Functional Endocrinology: Stomach Digestive Disorders

Do you feel:

  • Excessive belching, burping or bloating
  • A sense of fullness during and after meals
  • Gas immediately after a meal
  • Offensive breath
  • Difficulty digesting proteins and meats

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might be experiencing some stomach digestive disorders.

The Stomach

Diagram-human-stomach

The human stomach’s core function is to aid food to digest when an individual eats. The four critical components of the gastric digestive function are:

  • A reservoir capacity
  • Acid secretion
  • Enzyme secretion
  • Gastrointestinal motility

These four components help the stomach function properly in the digestive system and help the body absorb essential nutrients and are responsible for getting rid of waste out of the body. Any disorders like GERD, gallstones, and Crohn’s disease are a few of the many illnesses that can affect not only the stomach but the entire digestive system. It can cause a person to feel discomfort and can be long term if the individual has not treated it.

GERD

GERD or gastroesophageal reflux disease when the contents from the stomach move up into the esophagus, causing acid reflux. Researchers at the NIDDK (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) stated that about 20% of individuals are affected by GERD, if it is left untreated, it can sometimes cause serious complications.

WhatYouNeedToKnowAboutGERD

One of the main symptoms that GERD causes is heartburn. Heartburn is a discomfort feeling that is felt from behind the breastbone as a burning sensation. It tends to get worse on a person if they lay down, bend over, after eating food. Not all individuals with GERD experiences heartburn, there are other possible symptoms such as:

  • Chest pains
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Bad breath
  • The sensation of a lump in the throat
  • Sour taste in the mouth
  • Respiratory problems
  • Tooth decay

Gallstones

Gallstones are hardened deposits of digestive fluids that can form in the gallbladder. The gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped organ that’s located on the right side of the abdomen, just beneath the liver. It also holds bile fluid that releases into the small intestines. Gallstones can range in sizes from as small as sand to as large as a golf ball. According to Harvard Health Publications, about 80% of gallstones are made of cholesterol, while the other 20% is made up of calcium salts and bilirubin.

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Gallstones can lead to pain in the upper right abdomen. An individual may start to feel gallbladder pains when they eat foods that are high in fat, especially fried foods. Furthermore, if the pain continues, it may lead to an inflamed gallbladder or cholecystitis. They may also experience symptoms like:

  • Pain on the right-hand side of the body, just below the ribs
  • Back pain between the shoulder blades
  • Pain in the right shoulder
  • Nausea
  • Dark urine
  • Clay-colored stool
  • Stomach pain

Researchers stated that some people develop the chemical imbalance in their gallbladders causes gallstones while others do not. Gallstones are more common among people with obesity, and studies revealed that women can develop gallstones and may require surgery to remove them.

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease is an inflammatory disease. It causes inflammation in the body’s digestive tract and can cause several chronic illnesses. Inflammation caused by Crohn’s disease can be in different areas of the digestive tract in different people. The inflammation often spreads deep into the layers of the affected bowel tissue, causing pain, and sometimes lead to life-threating complications.

Crohns_disease_MED_ILL_EN

Crohn’s disease symptoms can vary depending on which part of the gut is affected in the body. Specific symptoms can often develop gradually and become worse over time, and it is rare for the symptoms of Crohn’s disease to develop suddenly and dramatically. The symptoms of Crohn’s disease include:

  • Pain
  • Ulcers in the gut
  • Mouth ulcers
  • Diarrhea
  • A fever
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Rectal bleeding and anal fissures
  • Anemia

The exact causes of Crohn’s disease are still unclear, but researchers theorized that it stems from an abnormal reaction in the immune system. The theory stated that the immune system attacks food, good bacteria, and beneficial substances as if they are unwanted substances. During the attack, the body’s white cells start building up in the lining of the gut and triggers inflammation. It is still unclear whether the abnormal immune system causes Crohn’s disease, but there are environmental factors that can increase the risk of inflammation.

Conclusion

The stomach’s primary function is to digest the food that a person consumes. Four components help aid the stomach to function correctly. When the stomach is dealing with chronic illnesses like Crohn’s disease, gallstones, and GERD, it can lead to inflammation on the intestinal barriers. When it is left untreated, it can lead to life long complicated problems in the body. Some products can help aid the stomach digestion as they help support the gastrointestinal system as well.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s bill on our website to get full details on this historic moment.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

AAAS, EurekAlert. “A Bulging Midriff Roughly Doubles Women’s Chances of Gallstone Surgery.” EurekAlert!, 13 Feb. 2006, www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-02/bsj-abm021006.php.

Brazier, Yvette. “Cholecystitis: Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 22 Jan. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/172067.php.

Brazier, Yvette. “Crohn’s Disease: Symptoms, Diet, Treatment, and Causes.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 11 Jan. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/151620.php.

Editorial Team, Healthline, and Heather Cruickshank. “Everything You Need to Know About Acid Reflux and GERD.” Healthline, 7 Dec. 2018, www.healthline.com/health/gerd.

Holland, Kimberly. “Understanding Crohn’s Disease.” Healthline, 2 May, 2019, www.healthline.com/health/crohns-disease.

MacGill, Markus. “GERD: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 18 Jan. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/14085.php.

Macon, Brindles Lee, et al. “Understanding Gallstones: Types, Pain, and More.” Healthline, 1 June, 2017, www.healthline.com/health/gallstones.

O’Connor, Anthony, and Colm O’Moráin. “Digestive Function of the Stomach.” Digestive Diseases (Basel, Switzerland), U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24732181.

Publishing, Harvard Health. “What to Do about Gallstones.” Harvard Health, 2011, www.health.harvard.edu/womens-health/what-to-do-about-gallstones.

Staff, Mayo Clinic. “Crohn’s Disease.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 13 Sept. 2019, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/crohns-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20353304.

Staff, Mayo Clinic. “Gallstones.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 8 Aug. 2019, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gallstones/symptoms-causes/syc-20354214.

Unknown, Unknown. “Definition & Facts for GER & GERD.” National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 Nov. 2014, www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/acid-reflux-ger-gerd-adults/definition-facts.

Functional Endocrinology: Gastrointestinal Impairments

Functional Endocrinology: Gastrointestinal Impairments

Do you feel the following:

  • Feeling those bowels do not empty completely
  • Lower abdominal pain relieved by passing stool or gas
  • Alternating constipation and diarrhea
  • A hard, dry, or small stool
  • Use laxatives frequently

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you must be experiencing gastrointestinal impairments in your body.

Gastrointestinal Impairments

Woman touching stomach painful suffering from stomachache causes of menstruation period, gastric ulcer, appendicitis or gastrointestinal system desease. Healthcare and health insurance concept

The digestive system is consisting of the gastrointestinal tract, which is home to the intestines, the liver, the colon, the gallbladder, the pancreas, and the stomach. When there is a disruption in the gastrointestinal tract, it can cause inflammation and chronic illnesses that can harm the body. Functional disorders in the digestive tract (GI tract) can look normal in the body, but it doesn’t work correctly.

Many factors can upset the GI tract and its motility, including:

  • Eating a diet low in fiber
  • Not getting enough exercise
  • Traveling or changes in a routine
  • Eating large amounts of dairy blankets
  • Stress
  • Resisting the urge to have a bowel movement
  • Overusing laxatives
  • Taking certain medicines

Some of the most common problems that can affect the GI tract are constipation, IBS, and colon cancer.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome

IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) is a long term gastrointestinal disorder. It can cause abdominal pain, bloating, mucus in the stool, irregular bowel habits, and can alternate diarrhea and constipation. IBS can cause persistent discomfort to individuals, but they can improve the symptoms over time as they learn to manage the condition.

IBS-1920x1080

Some of the symptoms caused by IBS are:

  • Changes in bowel habits
  • Abdominal pain and cramping that lessens after using the bathroom
  • A feeling that the bowels not fully emptied after using the bathroom
  • Excess gas
  • The passing of mucus from the rectum
  • The sudden urgent need to use the bathroom
  • Swelling or bloating from the abdomen.

Signs and symptoms of IBS can vary between individuals and can often resemble other diseases and conditions. IBS symptoms can often get worst after earing, and a flare-up may last about 2 to 4 days, then the symptoms may either improve or go away entirely, but IBS symptoms can affect different body parts.

These can include:

  • Frequent urination
  • Bad breath
  • Headaches
  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Persistent fatigue
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

Constipation

Constipation is one of the most common digestive problems that affects around 2.5 million individuals. It is a syndrome that is defined by bowel symptoms (painful or infrequent passage of stool, the hardness of stool, or a feeling of incomplete evacuation) that may occur either in isolation or secondary to another underlying disease like for example, Parkinson’s disease.

woman-is-holding-toilet-paper-concept-diarrhea-constipation_8119-1107

The cause of constipation is through the colon. The colon’s main job is to absorb water from leftover food as it passes through the digestive system and creates waste. When the waste is ready to be excreted out, the colon’s muscles propel the waste out through the rectum to eliminate from the body. If the debris remains in the colon for too long, though, it can be tough and challenging to excrete it out of the body.

Some factors can cause constipation; this can include:

  • Stress
  • Low-fiber diet
  • Lack of exercise
  • Certain medications
  • Particular diseases like a stroke, Parkinson’s disease, and diabetes
  • Problems with the colon or rectum
  • Hormonal issues

Everyone’s definition of a regular bowel movement may be different. Some people can go about three times a day, while others can go to relieve themselves about three times a week. Some of the symptoms of constipation included are:

  • Fewer than three bowel movements a week
  • Passing hard, dry stools
  • Straining or pain during bowel movements
  • Still feeling full after a bowel movement
  • Experiencing a rectal blockage

Colon Cancer

Colon cancer is the third most common type of cancer. When tumorous growths develop in the large intestine or the colon, it develops colon cancer in the GI tract. The colon, the one organ where the body draws out water and salt from solid wastes. The waste then moves through the rectum and excretes out of the body through the anus.

Colon-Cancer-What-do-the-Stages-Mean-722x406

Even though colon cancer doesn’t cause any symptoms in the earliest stages, but it can become more noticeable as the disease progresses. Some of the sign and symptoms of colon cancer include:

  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Changes in stool consistency
  • Loose, narrow stools
  • Blood in the stool
  • Abdominal pain
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Iron deficiency

If colon cancer spreads to a new location the gastrointestinal system, it can cause additional problems in the new area.

Conclusion

Having gastrointestinal impairments can cause the body to develop chronic illnesses. There are ways to make sure that the digestive tract is functioning correctly. An individual can change their diets and lifestyle and can make sure that their gut is working properly. When there is a disruption in the GI tract like IBS, constipation, and colon cancer, it can lead to many health problems if the individual is not careful. If an individual prolongs the symptoms, then they will develop life-long issues for their body. Some products help support the intestinal tract and help strengthens the natural defenses and support the intestinal immune function.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s declaration on our website to get full details on this historic moment.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Bharucha, Adil E, et al. “American Gastroenterological Association Technical Review on Constipation.” Gastroenterology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3531555/.

Brazier, Yvette. “Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS): Symptoms, Diet, Causes, and Treatment.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 18 Dec. 2017, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/37063.php.

Crosta, Peter. “Colon Cancer: Symptoms, Treatment, and Causes.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 28 Aug. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/150496.php.

Sethi, Saurabh. “What You Should Know About Constipation.” Healthline, 23 Aug. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/constipation.

Unknown, Unknown. “Digestive Disorders & Gastrointestinal Diseases.” Cleveland Clinic, 2017, my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/7040-gastrointestinal-disorders.

Whitfield, K Lynette, and Robert J Shulman. “Treatment Options for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders: from Empiric to Complementary Approaches.” Pediatric Annals, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2830707/.

 

 

Noninvasive Hormone Testing

Noninvasive Hormone Testing

The percentage of individuals that are affected by fatigue, headaches, and overall pain is continuously growing. For the most part, these symptoms can all be linked back to a hormone imbalance. Hormone imbalances are more common than individuals realize and can affect people of all ages. Originally, hormone testing was completed through a blood draw (serum testing). However, as science is improving, there are now better, more functional ways of testing.  

As more and more studies are done, it is becoming more clear that salivary testing is superior to serum (blood) testing for hormones. There are two forms in which hormones exist in the human body, free (5%) and protein-bound (95%). Due to the protein-bound hormones being bound, they become too large to pass through into the salivary glands. This meaning that they are not bio-available and can not be delivered to the receptors in the tissues of the body.  The unbound hormones, or free hormones, are the relevant hormones that are found in the saliva. Considering the fact that free hormones are not as abundant, the hormone levels found in saliva are significantly less than those found in serum. However, many patients who are treated with serum hormone results are often overdosed because of the lack of correlation between bio-availability.

 

Labrix by Doctor’s Data

Similar to the D.U.T.C.H hormone testing previously discussed, this company Labrix offers a variety of hormone testing as well.

 

 

labrix

 

 

Neurotransmitters:

  • NeuroBasic: ideal for monitoring therapeutic interventions of neurotransmitter imbalances previously tested or when symptoms are indicating an imbalance. This test measures Serotonin, Dopamine, Epinephrine, Norepinephrine, Glutamate, Glycine, Histamine, and Phenethylamine
  • Comprehensive Neurotransmitter: best when a comprehensive look at neurotransmitter secretion and metabolism of markers is needed. This test measures Serotonin, GABA, Dopamine, Norepinephrine, Epinephrine, Glutamate, Glycine, Histamine, and Phenethylamineand DOPAC, 3-MT, Normetanephrine, Metanephrine, 5-HIAA, Tryptamine, Tyrosine, Tyramine, and Taurine.

NeuroHormones: 

  • NeuroHormone Complete Plus:  provides insight on how the HPA axis function may be contributing to patients’ symptoms, such as mood swings, fatigue, and pain. In addition, this test is ideal for those who are at risk for breast cancer, PCOS, or a strong family history of autoimmune disease. This test is recommended for women only.  This test measures Estrone, Estradiol, Estriol, Progesterone, Testosterone, DHEA, Cortisol x 4, Serotonin, GABA, Dopamine, Epinephrine, Norepinephrine, Glutamate, Glycine, Histamine, Phenethylamine
  • NeuroHormone Complete: useful for patients (men or women) who are experiencing any type of mood disorder, addiction, fatigue, chronic illness, confusion, weight issues, low libido, PMS, or chronic pain. This test measures Estradiol, Progesterone, Testosterone, DHEA, Cortisol x 4, Serotonin, GABA, Dopamine, Epinephrine, Norepinephrine, Glutamate, Glycine, Histamine, Phenethylamine. 
  • NeuroAdrenal: Included in this test is a full diurnal cortisol pattern, DHEA, and 6 primary neurotransmitters to help those with symptoms such as depression, anxiety, addiction, chronic illness, and low libido. This test measures DHEA, Cortisol x 4, Serotonin, GABA, Dopamine, Epinephrine, Norepinephrine, Glutamate, Glycine, Histamine, Phenethylamine

Salivary Hormone: 

  • Comprehensive Plus: provides an assessment of breast cancer risk. This test is a consideration for women only who have an increased risk for developing breast cancer, other hormonally sensitive cancers, PCOS or a family history of autoimmune disease. This test measures estrone, estriol, and Estrogen Quotient.
  • Women’s Helth and breast Profile: includes two risk assessment ratios, the Estrogen Quotient and the Pg/E2 ratio
  • Comprehensive Hormone:  assessment of hormonal status and endocrine function and includes estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, DHEA and four cortisols. This profile is useful with male and female patients because it looks at the full diurnal cortisol pattern; it is especially important in patients who are experiencing the full diurnal pattern ( weight gain, high blood sugar, elevated lipids, chronic fatigue)
  • Short Comprehensive: useful in men and women whose primary symptoms are related to sex hormone imbalances (elevated or depressed E2, P or T)
  • Basic Hormone: a basic evaluation of the sex hormones and a brief glimpse at the adrenal function with the AM cortisol level. Best for men who are experiencing decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, loss os stamina, decreased mental sharpness and metabolic syndrome. Best for women who are experiencing hot flashes, anxiety, night sweats, breast tenderness, irritability, forgetfulness, and acne. 
  • Comprehensive Adrenal Function: provides insight into the body’s stress response. This test measures sIgA
  • Adrenal Function: comprehensive view of adrenal function, DHEA, and cortisol levels. This is best for people who are fatigued, nervous, weak, crave sugar, have headaches, irritability, and depression
  • Diurnal Cortisol: Similar to the test above but for patients who do not need DHEA testing
  • Melatonin: Provides a snapshot of the sleep/wake cycle during a one day period

Salivary Hormone + CAR :

  • CAR: has the capability to test all the same markers as above but adds Cortisol Awakening Response “CAR” to all of them. 

 

For more information regarding testing and hormones tested, please visit labrix.com  

 

LABRIX BASIC BOX CONTENTS:

Upon opening every box (no matter the labrix test) the patient will see a requisition form, a billable stamp, and a FedEx envelope. Under these two items, a styrofoam box (insulated cooler) with the imprint “doctorsdata.com” will be present. Once the patient lifts the lid off of the styrofoam box, they will see two more pieces of paper.  The first being a list of symptoms (patient survey) on a white sheet of paper that the patient is to fill out and place back in the styrofoam box and the second a small instruction manual.

 

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Neurotransmitter Tests Breakdown

For the Neurotransmitter Tests, the patient is provided with the basic kit described above. The only sample type required for the neurotransmitter tests is urine.

The contents of the styrofoam box include a small plastic cup, a clear plastic bag consisting of a white tube, a dropper, an absorbent pad, and a Lab-Brix ice pack. The first step is to freeze the ice-pack and keep it frozen until ready to ship. 

In order for this test to have proper results, the patient should collect their sample with their first or second-morning urine upon waking. Then, select on the requisition form which urine ( first or second ) the sample was collected from. It is also important to note on the requisition form what time the patient woke and what time the sample was collected. The urine sample should be collected midstream. Patients will collect their sample in the plastic cup provided, not directly in the tube. Next, the patients will use the dropper provided to transfer 10 ml of the sample from the cup into the tube. Ensure the lid is screwed on tightly and gently rock the tube back and forth for 3-5 seconds to mix the urine with the preservative. The patients will then wrap the absorbent pad around the tube (not inside the tube), and place the sample tube back in the plastic bag. The bag is then to be placed in the freezer for 4-6 hours, and is to be kept frozen until ready to ship! 

 

Neurotransmitter + Hormone Tests Breakdown

The Neurotransmitter + Hormone analysis tests consist of urine and saliva samples. This basic test kit includes everything above. However, upon opening this styrofoam box the patient will find two plastic bags. The first being a plain plastic clear bag with a dropper, white test tube, and absorbent pad. The second plastic bag is a biohazard bag that has multiple colors on the outside and consists of 4 clear small straws, an absorbent pad, and 4 small saliva collection tubes of various colors. 

The urine sample is instructed to be taken the same way as the neurotransmitter test.

The patient should collect their sample with their first or second-morning urine upon waking. Then, select on the requisition form which urine ( first or second ) the sample was collected from. (Remember, the individual is  to note on the requisition form time they woke and what time the sample was collected). Patients will collect their sample mid-stream in the plastic cup provided, not directly in the tube. Next, use the dropper provided to transfer 10 ml of the sample from the cup into the tube. Be sure to check that the lid is screwed on tightly and gently rock the tube back and forth for 3-5 seconds to mix the urine with the preservative. The patients will then wrap the absorbent pad around the tube (not inside the tube), and place the sample tube back in the plastic bag. The bag is then to be placed in the freezer for 4-6 hours, and is to be kept frozen until ready to ship!  

The salivary collection has a few more steps considering it is 4 samples rather than one. The timing for the salivary testing is critical, so timers are encouraged. As the patient wakes up, a timer should be set for 30 minutes later. This is when the first salivary sample (the pink tube) is to be collected. Before this test, the patient should not eat, drink, brush or floss. The second collection (green tube) is to be taken right before lunch, around noon. The third (orange tube), is to be collected in the evening before dinner, and the final collection (blue tube) before bed at night. 

For all salivary collections, each tube needs to be 3/4 of the way full. The straws provided are the patient’s choice to be used. As soon as the tube is 3/4 of the way full, snap the saliva lid tightly, put into the bag in which it came, and freeze for 4-6 hours, until ready to ship. Patients are to record the date and times of the saliva collections on the bag and requisition form. 

 

Salivary Hormone

Considering the salivary hormone testing is done using 4 saliva samples, the instructions are the same as the saliva collection in the test mentioned above. However, to review them again, the timing for the salivary testing is critical, so timers are highly encouraged.

As the patient wakes up, a timer should be set for 30 minutes later. This is when the first salivary sample (the pink tube) is to be collected. Before this test, the patient is not to eat, drink, brush or floss. For the second collection (green tube), it should be collected right before lunch, around noon. The third (orange tube), is to be obtained in the evening before dinner, and the final sample (blue tube) before bed at night. 

For all salivary collections, each tube needs to be 3/4 of the way full. The straws provided are to be used at the patient’s discretion. As soon as the tube is 3/4 of the way full, snap the saliva lid tightly, put into the bag in which it came, and freeze for 4-6 hours, until ready to ship. Patients are to record the date and times of the saliva collections on the bag and requisition form. 

 

Salivary Hormone + CAR Breakdown

Aside from the basic components, the styrofoam box includes 6 colored salvia collection tubes, 6 straws, and an absorbent pad. The tests that fall under this category require 6 samples throughout the day. It is important to remember to write down the time the samples were collected as well as the time when the patient first woke up. The first sample (yellow tube) is to be taken as soon as the patient is awake but has not gotten out of bed. In order to accomplish this properly, it is best the patient sets the tube next to their bed the night before. This makes it easy to collect first thing in the morning. It is very important that the patient sets an alarm for 30 minutes after they wake up ( second test, pink tube)and for 1 hour after they wake up (third test, lavender tube). These tests are all to be done prior to eating breakfast, brushing and flossing teeth. The fourth collection (green tube) is to be taken before lunch and the fifth (orange tube) before dinner. The sixth and final sample (blue tube) is to be collected at least one hour after dinner. Just as the other saliva samples mentioned above, these tubes are to be filled 3/4 of the way, tightly closed, placed back in the bag they came in and frozen for 4-6 hours, or until they are ready to ship.

 

 

SHIPPING INSTRUCTIONS FOR ALL TESTS:

Shipping should be done Monday-Friday as this will ensure the sample will be delivered to the lab on time. Make sure all paperwork is filled out properly and place contents back in the styrofoam box in the following order: 

  • sealed plastic bag with frozen specimen tubes
  • frozen ice pack 
  • requisition form, symptom sheet, and payment (if applicable) 

Next, place the lid back on the box and place the entire styrofoam box in the cardboard collection kit. Close the cardboard box and place it inside the FedEx shipping envelope provided. The patient will then write their name and address on the Billable Stamp and tear off the customer receipt for their records. Then, place on the FedEx envelope. The final step is to schedule a pick-up. In order to do this, the patient will call the FedEx toll-Free number at 1-800-463-3339 and select “schedule a pickup”. This MUST be a scheduled pick up from an address and NOT a dropbox. 

* It is important to note that patients should avoid eating avocados, eggplant, tomatoes, bananas, melons, pineapples, plums, nuts, nut butter, wine, cheese and chocolate 48 hours before and during the testing period as these could impact the results.

* Patients should keep in mind that strenuous exercise, alcohol, coffee, tea, tobacco or any other product containing nicotine is to be avoided 24 hours before and during the collection period.

 

Labrix is a great company that allows patients a noninvasive way to have their hormone levels checked. Almost every patient who walks in the door can benefit from this test. I highly recommend this test because hormone levels can change based on age, PMS symptoms, fatigue, blood sugar issues, or stress! These results are accurate and have a decently quick turn around time. Gaining insight and taking control of your body is now easier than ever. – Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach

 

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

*All information and photos/video content for this article are directly sourced from labrix. Please see labrix for more information and credit.

 

Functional Endocrinology: Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults

Functional Endocrinology: Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults

Do you feel that you must have sweets after meals? Do you get light-headed if you miss a meal? Or feel that craving for sweets during the day? Does your body feels shaky jittery or have tremors? If you are experiencing any of these situations, you may be experiencing LADA.

LADA

Autoimmune diabetes is a heterogeneous disease that can arise at any age. Anyone with adult-onset autoimmune diabetes who does not necessitate insulin therapy for at least six months after being diagnosed may have LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood). LADA is a slowly progressing form of autoimmune diabetes, and it has been estimated that 20% of people are diagnosed with having non-obesity-related type 2 diabetes.

LADA occurs when the pancreas stops producing adequate insulin and slowly damages the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, harming the body’s function. It is clear, however, that the frequency of autoimmune diabetes among adults can be underestimated, and clinical features such as age and severity of symptoms are of no help in identifying patients that have LADA since there is still more research being done to treat LADA. The body mass index and C peptide levels in the general population can increase with age, and these parameters are of limited use in identifying LADA patients.

Different Types of Diabetes

In a person, diabetes is a condition that impairs the body’s ability to process blood glucose, and roughly the estimated number of people over 18 years of age that are diagnosed and undiagnosed with diabetes is about 30.2 million. Without ongoing, careful management, diabetes can lead to a build-up of sugars in the blood, which can increase the risk of dangerous complications, including stroke and heart disease.

There are different kinds of diabetes, including LADA, that can occur, and managing the condition depends on the type of diabetes an individual has.

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is also known as juvenile diabetes, and the body does not produce enough insulin, and the blood glucose level remains high in the body. People with type 1 diabetes are insulin-dependent and must take artificial insulin daily to stay alive. The immune system attacks a cluster of cells known as islets in the pancreas that would typically produce insulin and stopping or slowing down the insulin production in the body.

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When a person receives a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes from healthcare professionals, the islet cells are responsible for insulin secretion from the pancreas may continue to produce the insulin hormone for a while before ceasing. It can also lead to the production of LADA if it is not being monitored.

The physical effects of type 1 diabetes include:

  • Increased hunger and thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Blurry vision
  • Tiredness and fatigue
  • Weight loss without an apparent trigger or causes.

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is one of the most common forms of diabetes and can appear at any age, affecting over 30 million Americans. It happens when the blood sugar levels rise due to problems with the use or production of insulin.

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Studies show that most people do not experience the symptoms in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, and they might have symptoms for many years. For those that do have type 2, diabetes may have acanthosis nigricans. Acanthosis nigricans is a skin condition that causes the skin to become thicker and darker. It often appears mostly on the neck, elbows, knees, knuckles, the folds around the neck and the groin.

Other early symptoms of type 2 diabetes that an individual may have included:

  • Frequent bladder, kidneys, or skin infections
  • Cuts that take longer to heal
  • Fatigue
  • Extreme hunger
  • Increased thirst
  • Urinary frequency
  • Blurred vision

Mixed Diabetes (Type 1.5)

Mixed diabetes or LADA is an autoimmune condition that shares the characteristics of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in adults. It is diagnosed during adulthood and sets in the bloodstream gradually; however, unlike type 2, LADA is an autoimmune disease and is not reversible if the person changes their diet and lifestyle.  It can be triggered by the damage done to the pancreas from the antibodies against the insulin-producing cells.

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If a person has LADA, their beta cells stop functioning much more quickly than type 2 diabetes. Researchers have found out that an estimated 10 percent of people who have diabetes will have LADA. It stated that the treatment for LADA patients is far less elucidated than the cases for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Finding a treatment strategy for LADA can reduce the decline of beta-cell function, ensures adequate metabolic treatment so far.

Some of the symptoms that LADA patients may have include:

  • Frequent thirst
  • Increased urination, including at night
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Blurred vision
  • Tingling nerves

If LADA is left untreated, it can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, which is a condition where the body can not utilize sugar as fuel due to the absence of insulin and starts burning fat. It produces ketones, which are toxic to the body.

Type 3 Diabetes

Type 3 diabetes is known as brain diabetes and has an established linked to Alzheimer’s disease. This type of diabetes is triggered by a type of insulin resistance and an insulin-like growth factor dysfunction that occurs specifically in the brain, causing dementia.

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Alzheimer’s disease has characteristics histopathological, molecular, and biochemical abnormalities in the brain’s cell structure. Since it has been linked with type 3 diabetes, characteristic features of type 3 diabetes include impairments in insulin actions and signaling that result in chronic hyperglycemia, irrespective of subtype, etiology, pathogenesis, or insulin availability.

Conclusion

Autoimmune diabetes can affect anyone at any age. It can damage the pancreas walls to stop producing insulin to the body, causing problems for an individual. LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes in adults) is an autoimmune disease that has the characteristics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes that are in adults. There is still more research being done to treat LADA, and there are products that can help support sugar metabolism and maintain blood sugar levels to a healthy range.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s declaration on our website to get full details on this historic moment.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Barhum, Lana. “Type 2 Diabetes: Symptoms, Early Signs, and Complications.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 16 Apr. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317462.php.

Castro, M. Regina. “Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA): What Is It?” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 10 May 2019, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes/expert-answers/lada-diabetes/faq-20057880.

de la Monte, Suzanne M, and Jack R Wands. “Alzheimer’s Disease Is Type 3 Diabetes-Evidence Reviewed.” Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Diabetes Technology Society, Nov. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769828/.

Felman, Adam. “Type 1 Diabetes: Overview, Symptoms, and Treatment.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 19 Nov. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323729.php.

Hals, Ingrid K. “Treatment of Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults: What Is Best?” Current Diabetes Reviews, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30009709.

Leonard, Jayne. “Acanthosis Nigricans: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, and Pictures.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 21 Dec. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324062.php.

MSN, Rachel Nall RN. “Diabetes: Symptoms, Treatment, and Early Diagnosis.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 8 Nov. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323627.php.

Pozzilli, Paolo, and Silvia Pieralice. “Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults: Current Status and New Horizons.” Endocrinology and Metabolism (Seoul, Korea), Korean Endocrine Society, June 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6021307/.

Prelipcean, Maria S. “What You Need to Know About Type 1.5 Diabetes.” Healthline, 2 Nov. 2018, www.healthline.com/health/type-1-5-diabetes.

Watson, Kathryn. “Type 3 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease: What You Need to Know.” Healthline, 16 Oct. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/type-3-diabetes.

Wint, Carmella, and Marijane Leonard. “What You Should Know About Diabetic Ketoacid.” Healthline, 4 Dec. 2018, www.healthline.com/health/type-2-diabetes/ketoacidosis.

Functional Endocrinology: Normalizing the Gut

Functional Endocrinology: Normalizing the Gut

Microbes have multicellular hosts and can have many effects on the host’s health and well-being. Researchers have stated that microbes influence metabolism, immunity, and behavior on the human body. One of the most important but understudied mechanisms that microbes have is that they can involve hormones. In the presence of gut microbiota, specific changes in hormone levels can correlate in the gut. The gut microbiota can produce and secrete hormones, respond to the host hormones, and regulate their expression levels. There is also a link between the endocrine system and the gut microbiota as more information is still being researched.

The Gut to Hormone Connection

Since the human microbiome contains a vast array of microbes and genes that shows a higher complexity. Unlike other organs in the body, the gut microbiota’s function is not fully understood yet but can be disrupted easily by antibiotics, diet, or surgery. The best-characterized function is how the gut microbiota interacts with the endocrine system in the body.

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Emerging research has indicated that the gut microbiome plays a central role in regulating estrogen levels within the body. When the estrogen hormone levels are too high or too low, it can lead to the risk of developing estrogen-related diseases like endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, breast cancer, and prostate cancer to males and females.

The gut to hormone connection is essential since the gut is one of the producers to create hormones that travel through the entire body system. With the endocrine system is being involved, it is the first network to produce and transport hormones to the organs that need the hormones to function. When there is an imbalance of hormones in the human body, it can disrupt all the other hormones.

The gut microbiota influences nearly every hormone that the endocrine system creates, including:

  • The thyroid hormones
  • Estrogen hormones
  • Stress hormones

Thyroid Hormones

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If the gut has inflammation, then the hormones in the body will create an excessive or low quantity in the body. If the endocrine glands like thyroid, are producing a low quantity of hormones and the gut can be imbalanced and lead to hypothyroidism. When there is low microbial diversity in the gut, studies have shown that the low microbial diversity is linked to high TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) levels. The excessive quantity of thyroid hormones can lead to hyperthyroidism. Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism can cause symptoms like irritability, anxiety, poor memory, and many symptoms that can affect the body.

“If you are experiencing excessive belching, burping, bloating, difficult bowel movements difficulty digesting proteins and meats; undigested food found in stools, digestive problems subside with rest and relaxation or any symptoms. Then this article will give you a better understand what is happening with the gut and how hormones can affect the gut system.”

Estrogen Hormones

The gut and an individual’s hormones are meant to be in communication with each other. They not only support each other, but they also work together to make sure the body is running smoothly. Studies have found out that the gut’s intestinal cells have special receptors for hormones that allow them to detect any hormonal shifts that affect the body.

Since estrogen is typically associated with women, it is common that men need the right amount of estrogen levels to function. The gut microbiota is the key regulator of leveling and circulating estrogen in the body. The microbes produce an enzyme called beta-glucuronidase, which then converts the estrogen hormone to its active form.

The gut microbiome can regulate estrogen levels by functioning a specific bacteria in the microbiome called estrobolome. Estrobolome is the aggregates of enteric bacterial genes that are capable of metabolizing estrogen. It might affect women’s risk of developing postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. The estrobolome is highly essential to keep estrogen levels in the body at a stable state.

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In the gut microbiota, both the estrogen and progesterone hormones can impact the guts’ motility and peristalsis ( The rhythmic movement of the intestines that move food through the stomach and out of the body) by playing opposing roles in the guts’ motility. Progesterone helps slow down the gut’s motility by relaxing the smooth and slowing transit the time the food is moving out of the body. Estrogen helps increase the contraction of the smooth muscles in the intestines. When the estrogen hormones are leveled right, it can help keep the gut moving smoothly and help increase the diversity of the body’s microbiomes, which is a good thing for the immune system.

Stress Hormones

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Stress hormones or cortisol plays a massive part in the gut microbiota. Since cortisol hormones connect to the brain, it sends the signals to the gut and vice versa. If it is a short stressor like getting ready for a presentation or a job interview, the person will feel “butterflies” in their gut. The longer stressors, for example, like having a highly stressful job or feeling anxious consistently, can lead to chronic illnesses in the gut like inflammation or leaky gut. Since the hormone and gut connection is in sync with the gut and brain connection, it is crucial to lowering the cortisol levels to a stable state for a healthy functional body.

Conclusion

The gut and hormone connections are profoundly meaningful since they are linked closely together. When there is a disruption on the gut, it can cause hormones to be imbalanced, causing many disruptions like inflammation and leaky gut. When there is a disruption in the hormones, it can disrupt the gut as well by negatively shifting the gut’s microbiome. So to ensure that the gut is functioning correctly, it is crucial to eat food that contains probiotics and is fermented to keep the gut flora healthy. Some products can help counter the metabolic effects of temporary stress and supporting estrogen metabolism by incorporating other essential nutrients and cofactors to support the endocrine system.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s declaration on our website to get full details on this historic moment.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Author, Guest. “How Your Gut Microbiome Influences Your Hormones.” Bulletproof, 21 Aug. 2019, www.bulletproof.com/gut-health/gut-microbiome-hormones/.

Evans, James M, et al. “The Gut Microbiome: the Role of a Virtual Organ in the Endocrinology of the Host.” The Journal of Endocrinology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 28 Aug. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23833275.

Kresser, Chris. “The Gut–Hormone Connection: How Gut Microbes Influence Estrogen Levels.” Kresser Institute, Kresserinstitute.com, 10 Oct. 2019, kresserinstitute.com/gut-hormone-connection-gut-microbes-influence-estrogen-levels/.

Kwa, Maryann, et al. “The Intestinal Microbiome and Estrogen Receptor-Positive Female Breast Cancer.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Oxford University Press, 22 Apr. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5017946/.

Neuman, Hadar, et al. “Microbial Endocrinology: the Interplay between the Microbiota and the Endocrine System.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 20 Feb. 2015, academic.oup.com/femsre/article/39/4/509/2467625.

Publishing, Harvard Health. “The Gut-Brain Connection.” Harvard Health, 2018, www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/the-gut-brain-connection.

Szkudlinski, Mariusz W, et al. “Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Structure-Function Relationships.” Physiological Reviews, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Apr. 2002, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11917095.

Wieselman, Brie. “Why Your Gut Health and Microbiome Make-or-Break Your Hormone Balance.” Brie Wieselman, 28 Sept. 2018, briewieselman.com/why-your-gut-health-and-microbiome-make-or-break-your-hormone-balance/.

 

 

Functional Endocrinology: Endocrine Disruptors

Functional Endocrinology: Endocrine Disruptors

Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that may interfere with the body’s endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, and immune effects in humans. It can be pesticides, plasticizers, antimicrobials, and flame retardants that can be EDCs. EDCs (endocrine-disrupting chemicals) can disrupt the hormonal balance and can result in developmental and reproductive abnormalities in the body.

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There are four points about endocrine disruption:

  • Low dose matters
  • Wide range of health benefits
  • Persistence of biological effects
  • Ubiquitous exposure

EDC can cause significant risks to humans by targeting different organs and systems in the body. The interactions and the mechanisms of toxicity created by EDC and environmental factors can be concerning a person’s general health problems. Including endocrine disturbances in the body since many factors can cause endocrine disruptors, one of the disruptors in the food contaminated with PBDEs (polybrominated diphenyl esters) in fish meat and dairy.

Researchers also pointed out that once the contaminated foods eliminated from a person’s diet, then the endocrine disruptors decline, and the body began to heal properly. When a person eliminates the food that is causing discomfort to their bodies, they are more aware of reading the food labels to prevent discomfort anymore to the body systems.

Obesogen

Obesogen is a subclass of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) that might predispose individuals to the development of obesity. Their structure is mainly lipophilic, and they can increase fat deposition. Since the fat cell’s primary role is to store and release energy, researchers have found that different obesogenic compounds may have different mechanisms of action.

Some of these actions can affect the number of fat cells that are producing, while others affect the size of the fat cells, and some obesogenic compounds can affect the hormones. These compounds will affect the appetite, satiety, food preferences, and energy metabolism when the endocrine system plays a fundamental role in the body to regulate the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins. Any alternations in the body can result in an imbalance in the metabolism and causing endocrine disorders.

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Studies even stated that exposure to obesogens could be found either before birth on utero or in the neonatal period. Obesogens can even cause a decrease in male fertility. When this disruption happens to the male body, environmental compounds can cause a predispose to weight gain, and obesogens can appoint as one of the contributors because of their actions as endocrine disruptors. Obesogens can even change the functioning of the male reproductive axis and testicular physiology. The metabolism in the male human body can be pivotal for spermatogenesis due to these changes.

Endocrine Disruptors and Obesity

Some endocrine disruptors that can affect the body can be through pharmaceutical drugs that can cause weight gain. A variety of prescription drugs can have an adverse effect that can result in weight gain since the chemicals found in prescription drugs have similar structures, and modes of action might have a role in obesity. Prescription medicine can stimulate the gut to consume more food, thus involving the body to gain weight.

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Another endocrine disruptor is PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). These are a family of environmental chemicals that occur in oil, coal, and tar deposits. They produce as by-products of fuel-burning like fossil fuel, biomass, cigarette smoke, and diesel exhaust. PAHs can either be manufactured to be used as medicines and pesticides or be released naturally from forest fires and volcanoes.

There are standard ways a person can be exposed to PAHs. One is through eating grilled, charred, or charcoal-broiled meats that a person eats. The other is through inhalation of smoke from cigarettes, vehicle exhaust, or emissions from fossil fuels that can irritate the eyes and breathing passageways in the body.

Coping with EDC Exposure

Even though obesity can adversely affect the body in a variety of health outcomes, there are ways to cope and minimize the exposure of EDC. Research shows that a person can minimize EDC exposure by consuming organic fruits, vegetables, and grain products insofar as possible. This includes an increasing number of fungicides routinely applied to fruits and vegetables that are being identified as obesogens and metabolic disruptors in the body.

Xenoestrogen vs. Phytoestrogen

When a person has an endocrine disorder, it might be due to the food they are consuming. Phytoestrogens are plant-derived compounds that are in a wide variety of food, mostly in soy. They are presented in numerous dietary supplements and widely marketed as a natural alternative to estrogen replacement therapy.

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There is a health impact on phytoestrogen, and the plant-derived compound can either mimic, modulate, or disrupt the actions of endogenous estrogen. Xenoestrogen are synthetically derived chemical agents from certain drugs, pesticides, and industrial by-products that mimic endogenous hormones or can interfere with endocrine disruptors. These chemical compounds can cause an effect on several developmental anomalies to humans. It can also interfere with the production and metabolism of ovarian estrogen in females.

Conclusion

Endocrine disruptors can interfere with the body’s endocrine system causing a health risk to an individual. EDC (endocrine-disrupting chemicals) can target many different organs and systems of the body by various factors that the human body is being exposed to. One of the EDC factors is obesogen, and it can cause a person to gain weight and be obese. Another factor is the exposure of PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) through environmental factors like smoke inhalation or consuming charcoal-broiled meats. There are ways to cope with EDC exposure, and one is eating organic foods, especially fresh fruits and vegetables. Another is products that target the endocrine system and helps support the liver, intestines, body metabolism, and estrogen metabolism to ensure not only a healthy endocrine system but also a healthy body to function correctly.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s proclamation on our website to get full details on this historic event.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Cardoso, A M, et al. “Obesogens and Male Fertility.” Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27776203.

Darbre, Philippa D. “Endocrine Disruptors and Obesity.” Current Obesity Reports, Springer US, Mar. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5359373/.

Holtcamp, Wendee. “Obesogens: an Environmental Link to Obesity.” Environmental Health Perspectives, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Feb. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3279464/.

Janesick, Amanda S, and Bruce Blumberg. “Obesogens: an Emerging Threat to Public Health.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851574/.

Janesick, Amanda S, and Bruce Blumberg. “Obesogens: an Emerging Threat to Public Health.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26829510.

Kyle, Ted, and Bonnie Kuehl. “Prescription Medications & Weight Gain.” Obesity Action Coalition, 2013, www.obesityaction.org/community/article-library/prescription-medications-weight-gain/.

Lóránd, T, et al. “Hormonal Action of Plant Derived and Anthropogenic Non-Steroidal Estrogenic Compounds: Phytoestrogens and Xenoestrogens.” Current Medicinal Chemistry, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20738246.

Patisaul, Heather B, and Wendy Jefferson. “The Pros and Cons of Phytoestrogens.” Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3074428/.

Singleton, David W, and Sohaib A Khan. “Xenoestrogen Exposure and Mechanisms of Endocrine Disruption.” Frontiers in Bioscience : a Journal and Virtual Library, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 Jan. 2003, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12456297.

Unknown, Unknown. “Endocrine Disruptors.” National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2015, www.niehs.nih.gov/health/topics/agents/endocrine/index.cfm.

Unknown, Unknown. “Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs): Your Environment, Your Health | National Library of Medicine.” U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 31 Apr. 2017, toxtown.nlm.nih.gov/chemicals-and-contaminants/polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbons-pahs.

Yang, Oneyeol, et al. “Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals: Review of Toxicological Mechanisms Using Molecular Pathway Analysis.” Journal of Cancer Prevention, Korean Society of Cancer Prevention, 30 Mar. 2015, www.jcpjournal.org/journal/view.html?doi=10.15430%2FJCP.2015.20.1.12.

Functional Endocrinology: Hepatic Biotransformation & Hormone Balance

Functional Endocrinology: Hepatic Biotransformation & Hormone Balance

Biotransformation is the process of a substance changes from one chemical to another being transformed by a chemical reaction within the body. In the human body though, biotransformation is the process of rendering nonpolar (fat-soluble) compounds to polar (water-soluble) substances so they can be excreted in urine, feces, and sweat. It also serves as an important defense mechanism in the body to eliminate toxic xenobiotics out of the body through the liver. The liver is the one that takes these toxins and transformed them into suitable compounds to excrete out of the body as biotransformation.

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Detoxification is also known as “detoxication” in literature. It is also a type of alternative medicine treatment that aims the body to get rid of unspecified “toxins.” It is highly important for a person to detox their body and with biotransformation, it can be classified into two categories, under normal sequences, which tends to react with a xenobiotic. They are called Phase 1 and Phase 2 reactions that help the body with detoxification.

Phase 1 Reactions

Phase 1 reaction is consisting of oxidation-reduction and hydrolysis. Research shows that Phase 1 is generally the first defense employed by the body to biotransform xenobiotics, steroid hormones, and pharmaceuticals. They create CYP450 (cytochrome P450) enzymes and are described as functionalization microsomal membrane-bound that are located in the liver but can also be in enterocytes, kidney, lungs and the brain in the body. The CYP450 enzymes can be beneficial or have consequences for an individual’s response to the effect of a toxin they are exposed to.

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Studies have been shown that phase 1 reactions have been affecting the elderly population. It states that hepatic phase 1 reaction involving oxidation, hydrolysis, and reduction appears to be more altered by age since the elderly population comprises the fastest-growing segment of the world’s population. It also states that there is a predictable, age-related decline in cytochrome P-540 function and combined with the polypharmacy that much of the elderly population experiences, this may lead to a toxic reaction of medication.

Phase 2 Reaction

Phase 2 reaction is part of the cellular biotransformation machinery and is a conjugation reaction in the body. They can involve the transfer of a number of hydrophilic compounds to enhanced the metabolites, and the excretion in the bile or urine in the body. The enzymes in Phase 2 reaction can also comprise multiple proteins and subfamilies to play an essential role in eliminating the biotransformed toxins and metabolizing steroid hormones and bilirubin in the body.

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Phase 2 enzymes can function not only in the liver but also in other tissues like the small intestines. When it combined with Phase 1, they can help the body naturally detox the toxins that the body may encounter. Hormones, toxins, and drugs undergo a hepatic transformation by Phase 1 and Phase 2 pathways in the liver, then are eliminated by phase 3 pathways.

Xenobiotics

Xenobiotics has been defined as chemicals that undergo metabolism and detoxication to produce numerous metabolites, some of which have the potential to cause unintended effects such as toxicity. They can also block the action of enzymes or receptors used for endogenous metabolism and produce liver damage to a person. Xenobiotics like drugs, chemotherapy, food additives, and environmental pollutants can generate serval free radicals that lead to an increase of oxidative stress in the cells. Accumulation of oxidative stress in the body can lead to an increase in potential cellular reduction in the body.

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Research shows that the body has a major challenge when it is detoxifying xenobiotics out of the body system and the body must be able to remove the almost-limitless number of the xenobiotic compounds from the complex mixture of chemicals that are involved in normal metabolism.

Studies even show that if the body doesn’t have a normal metabolism, many xenobiotics would reach toxic concentrations. It can even reach the respiratory tract either through airborne toxins or the bloodstream. It is important to make sure that the body and especially the liver to be healthy. Since the liver is the largest internal organ, it is responsible for detoxifying the toxins out of the body as urine, bile, and sweat.

Conclusion

Biotransformation is the process of substance changes from one chemical to another. In the body, it is a process of rendering fat-soluble compounds to water-soluble compounds, so it can be excreted out of the body as either urine, feces, or sweat. The liver is the one that causes toxic xenobiotics to transform into biotransformation and going through phase 1 and 2 to excrete the toxins out of the body for a healthy function.

Phase 1 reactions in the body are the first line of defense of the body detoxifying itself. Phase 2 creates CYP450 (cytochrome P450) that helps the body take the xenobiotic toxins and oxidates to reduce and hydrolysis the toxins to metabolites. Those metabolites then transform into Phase 2 reactions, which conjugates the metabolites in the body to be excreted out of the body. There are many factors that can make the body have xenobiotics, but the liver is the main organ to detoxify the xenobiotics out of the system. If there is an abundance of xenobiotics in the body, it can cause toxicity reaction causing the body to develop chronic illnesses. These products are known to help support the intestines and liver detoxication as well as, to help support hepatic detoxication for optimal healthy body function.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s bill on our website to get full details.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Chang, Jyh-Lurn, et al. “UGT1A1 Polymorphism Is Associated with Serum Bilirubin Concentrations in a Randomized, Controlled, Fruit and Vegetable Feeding Trial.” The Journal of Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Apr. 2007, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17374650/.

Croom, Edward. “Metabolism of Xenobiotics of Human Environments.” Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22974737.

Hindawi, Unknown. “Xenobiotics, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidants.” Xenobiotics, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidants, 17 Nov. 2017, www.hindawi.com/journals/omcl/si/346976/cfp/.

Hodges, Romilly E, and Deanna M Minich. “Modulation of Metabolic Detoxification Pathways Using Foods and Food-Derived Components: A Scientific Review with Clinical Application.” Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4488002/.

Kaye, Alan D, et al. “Pain Management in the Elderly Population: a Review.” The Ochsner Journal, The Academic Division of Ochsner Clinic Foundation, 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3096211/.

M.Haschek, Wanda, et al. “Respiratory System.” ScienceDirect, Academic Press, 17 Dec. 2009, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780123704696000064.

panelEdwardCroom, Author links open overlay, et al. “Metabolism of Xenobiotics of Human Environments.” ScienceDirect, Academic Press, 11 Sept. 2012, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780124158139000039.

Sodano, Wayne, and Ron Grisanti. “The Physiology and Biochemistry of Biotransformation/Detoxification.” Functional Medicine University, 2010.

Unknown, Unknown. “ToxTutor – Introduction to Biotransformation.” U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 2017, toxtutor.nlm.nih.gov/12-001.html.

Zhang, Yuesheng. “Phase II Enzymes.” SpringerLink, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1 Jan. 1970, link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-3-642-16483-5_4510.

 

 

Functional Endocrinology: Prostaglandin Balance

Functional Endocrinology: Prostaglandin Balance

Prostaglandins are different than hormones. They are not secreted from a gland that can be carried through the bloodstream and work on specific areas around the body. Prostaglandins are made by a chemical reaction in the body that can be made in all the organs and are part of the body’s way of dealing with injuries and illnesses.

When any part of the body has been damaged, prostaglandins are made at the site of tissue damage or infection where they cause inflammation, pain and fever as part of the body’s healing process. When there is a high level of prostaglandins in the body due to the natural healing process from injuries and inflammation, it can contribute to several diseases from the unwanted inflammation.

Prostaglandins in the Omega fatty acids

In omega-6 fatty acids, DGLA (dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid) creates Prostaglandin E1(PG-1) as anti-inflammatory receptors in the body. In omega-3 fatty acids, they can create Prostaglandin E3 (PG-3) that are also anti-inflammatory receptors as well. PG-1 and PG-3 help prevent blood clotting in the body system.

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When it comes to pro-inflammatory receptors, omega-6 fatty acids have these receptors as well. Pro-inflammatory receptors are created by arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid creates Prostaglandin E2 (PG-2), which is responsible for inflammation, swelling and clotting as well.

There has to be a balance between PG-2 and PG-1,3 to provide a healthy function in the body and an ideal hormone signaling response. When one of the PGs are being disrupted by trans-fatty acids from food, it can cause health problems to a person.

Deficiencies in Prostaglandins

Trans fatty acids are a form of unsaturated fats that can be either natural or artificial. They are produced either by hydrogenation of unsaturated oils or by biohydrogenation in the stomach of ruminant animals. Numerous studies have been shown that consuming trans fatty acids continuously can increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. This can also increase the ratio of LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol in the body. Trans fatty acids can block the activity of D6D (delta-6-desaturase), which is the first step in prostaglandin synthesis from essential fats in the diet.

The excess sugar consumption, insulin surges, inflammation, protein deficiencies hypothyroidism, and alcohol consumption will impair the activity of D6D and be a marker of accelerating aging to the human body. When a person has an increased consumption from fried foods and vegetable oils in an Western diet will shift the omega-6 pathway from PG-1 and into PG-2 production in the body. With the current American diet, people consume a high quantity of omega-6 fatty acids and low quantity of omega-3 fatty acids. This will cause a strong reaction of an inflammatory prostaglandin shift.

Since prostaglandins are caused by injuries and inflammation to heal the body, when an individual consumes a high omega-6 diet, it can cause an excessive amount of inflammation to the body and it can lead to chronic illnesses.

More Deficiencies in Prostaglandins

A deficiency in nutrients like nicotinic acid, pyridoxal 5’ -phosphate, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and molybdenum is required for the desaturase and elongase enzymes in omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. Their deficiency can lead to improper production of prostaglandins. So EFAs from diets cause overconsumption of omega-6 and a lack of essential fatty acids in the body.

After that happens, then the EFAs can be synthesized into prostaglandins with desaturase and elongase enzymes. This will then cause nutrient deficiencies and metabolic factors can impair and downregulate those enzymes and causing the body to be prone to pro-inflammatory.

When that happens, prostaglandin formation will suddenly turn into abnormal ratios in the body causing problems, excessive inflammation in the endocrine glands and the body organs, and soon later on if it is not fixed, chronic illnesses will cause proper hormones to alter their components and either stop producing or create an abundance in the body.

Conclusion

Prostaglandins are a chemical reaction to the body that are different than hormones. They are caused when the body is injured and it causes inflammation so it can naturally heal itself. When there is an excessive amount of prostaglandins in the body it can lead to chronic inflammation and cause an abnormal shift in the body’s functional state. A factor that can affect the prostaglandins as well is the excessive consumption of omega-6 fatty acids. This consumption can cause inflammation and can make the body feel sluggish and not feeling great. There are products that can help the body, especially balancing the production of essential fatty acids and metabolizing the body for optimal health.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s bill on our website to get full details.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

F.Horrobin, David. “Loss of Delta-6-Desaturase Activity as a Key Factor in Aging.” Medical Hypotheses, Churchill Livingstone, 22 Mar. 2004, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0306987781900645.

Horrobin, D F. “Fatty Acid Metabolism in Health and Disease: the Role of Delta-6-Desaturase.” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 1993, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8386433.

Innes, Jacqueline K, and Philip C Calder. “Omega-6 Fatty Acids and Inflammation.” Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29610056.

Iqbal, Mohammad Perwaiz. “Trans Fatty Acids – A Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease.” Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences, Professional Medical Publicaitons, Jan. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3955571/.

Leech, Joe. “What Are Trans Fats, and Are They Bad for You?” Healthline, 30 July 2019, www.healthline.com/nutrition/why-trans-fats-are-bad.

Ricciotti, Emanuela, and Garret A FitzGerald. “Prostaglandins and Inflammation.” Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3081099/.

Tallima, Hatem, and Rashika El Ridi. “Arachidonic Acid: Physiological Roles and Potential Health Benefits – A Review.” Journal of Advanced Research, Elsevier, 24 Nov. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6052655/.

Unknown, Unknown. “Prostaglandins.” You and Your Hormones, Dec. 2016, www.yourhormones.info/hormones/prostaglandins/.

Wang, Xiaoping, et al. “Multiple Roles of Dihomo-γ-Linolenic Acid against Proliferation Diseases.” Lipids in Health and Disease, BioMed Central, 14 Feb. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3295719/.

 

Understanding Integrative Hormone Testing

Understanding Integrative Hormone Testing

Trouble concentrating, mood swings, headaches, and fatigue could be a common occurrence in one’s day to day life.  These symptoms are commonly brushed off as lack of sleep but did you know these symptoms are also side effects of hormone imbalance? 

Hormone imbalance is fairly common and can be tested for and treated. One of the most accurate tests to date that checks for hormone imbalances is the D.U.T.C.H test. 

What Is It?

D.U.T.C.H is a type of hormone testing that stands for Dried Urine Test for Comprehensive Hormones. Dried urine samples make it possible for scientists to see a whole day of hormones and quantify aspects that are distinct. Unlike obtaining information from a blood draw, urine contains different components that provide scientists with a new line of insight.

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What Is The Goal?

When it comes to a hormone imbalance, the adrenal glands may have a large impact. The adrenals are two small glands that sit on top of the kidneys. These small glands are responsible for producing vital hormones such as sex hormones and cortisol. These hormones help the body respond to stress along with other functions

With the turn around time being around 10 business days, individuals can gain control and receive the insight they may have been missing.  Precision Analytical (the founders of D.U.T.C.H) employs the most innovative instruments to achieve the best outcomes for patients. The main purpose is to create an understanding of what is currently going on in the patient’s body and allows the treatment to become more specific and targeted to the needs of the individual.

There are different D.U.T.C.H tests that may be completed depending on the patient’s needs. The three main tests are

  • Dutch Complete– This is a comprehensive assessment of sex and adrenal hormones and their metabolites. This test measures progesterone, androgen, estrogen metabolites, cortisol, cortisone, cortisol metabolites, creatine, DHEA-S. 
  • Dutch Plus– This test uses 5 -6 saliva samples as well as 4 urine samples to provide the up and down pattern of cortisol and cortisone throughout the day. This test adds salivary cortisol measurements of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) to the dutch complete to bring another important piece of the HPA axis into focus
  • Dutch Test Cycle Mapping– This test maps the progesterone and estrogen pattern throughout the menstrual cycle. It provides the full picture of a woman’s cycle to answer important questions for patients with month-long symptoms, infertility, and PCOS. This test is targeted to measure 9 estrogens and progesterone that are taken throughout the cycle to characterize the follicular, ovulatory, and luteal phases. 

How Does This Operate?

Precision Analyical, Inc. has found a way to utilize scientists who have extensive experience and coupled them with the most advanced analytical methods and instruments. This permits them to achieve the best outcomes when it comes to the D.U.T.C.H test.

One of the reasons that many practicing offices have started to utilize D.U.T.C.H evaluations is because they have an extremely simple sample collection. Patients will collect dried urine samples within a span of 24 hours. The urine samples offer results that are excellent because the collections provide the span of a patients entire day of hormones. 

For the D.U.T.C.H test, the patient will collect 4-5 urine samples throughout a 24 hour time period. Upon opening the kit, the patient will be faced with a folder. This folder includes step by step instructions as well as a pocket. Inside the pocket, the patient will find a requisition form, an envelope, and a small clear plastic bag containing the collection paper. 

Each sample will be completed on a separate collection sheet that is labeled with the time. Once the patient opens this bag, they will be able to unfold the first sample paper. The patient will obtain the initial sample at approximately 5pm ( dinnertime). Once the samples are taken, they are to be left open to dry for 24 hours. The second sample is to be taken around 10 pm (bedtime). This third sample depends upon each individual, but in the event, the patient awakens to urinate during the night, a sample is to be gathered. The next sample ought to be collected within 10 minutes of rising. It’s very important that the patient does not lay in bed after waking and they amass this sample within the 10 minute time period that is allotted. Once the patient has collected their morning sample upon rising, they should set an alarm for two hours, since this is when the final sample will be collected. As soon as all the samples have been collected and set out open to dry for 24 hours, the patient can fold them back up and fill out the information on the back of the card ( i.e first name, last name, date of collection, time, and day of cycle for women) and place them inside the clear plastic bag. 

From here, the patient can place the plastic bag full of their samples along with the requestion form in the envelope provided. Next, place 8 stamps in the correct corner, and send it off to the lab! 

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For the D.U.T.C.H Plus test, individuals will collect dried urine samples as well as saliva samples. This is best so researchers can utilize information from both collection samples to measure the cortisol and cortisone markers as well. For this test, it is completed in a 24 hour time window with 4 dried urine samples and 5 or 6 (depending on the individual) salvia samples. This test may sound more complicated, but it has a fairly easy schedule that makes it just as simple as the D.U.T.C.H complete. The kit will include labeled urine and salvia collection methods along with easy to read instructions. 

When opening this test, the patient will find an instruction book, a requisition form, 4 collection sheets for the urine (labeled with the time) and 6 labeled tubes for the saliva. For all the urine samples, fill out the backside of the card as prompted (last name, first name, date, and time). Saturate the filter paper or urinate into a clean cup and dip the filter paper for 5 seconds. Once this step is completed, leave the sample open to dry for 24 hours. 

For the saliva samples, take out the appropriate tube for the time it is to be collected. Just as done with the urine, fill out the allotted area requesting last name, first time, sample date and time. The saliva tubes have a blue cap that needs to be removed. After this cap is removed, a long cotton swab will be visible. Take out the cotton swab but leave the small tube in the long tube. The patient will then take the cotton swab and leave it in their mouth until it is fully saturated. Once this is done, place the cotton swab back in the tube as it was found and place the blue cap back on. The small tube should stay intact. There is no need to spit in the tubes. 

The first sample will be salvia and urine. These samples are to be collected immediately upon waking (no brushing of the teeth). The next two samples will be saliva. These are to be taken 30 minutes and 60 minutes after waking. After these are completed, the patient may brush their teeth. The fourth sample will be collected 2-3 hours after waking and is urine only. The fifth and sixth samples will be urine and salvia. The patient will collect these around 4-5 pm (dinnertime) and again anywhere from 10pm-midnight (bedtime). Place all saliva tubes in the freezer until they are ready to be shipped. 

The seventh saliva sample is optional. This will be collected at the time the patient wakes throughout the night if they do so. 

After all the samples have been collected and urine has dried for 24 hours, fold up the urine samples and place them back in the small plastic bag in which they came. Then, take the frozen saliva samples out of the freezer and place them in the plastic bag they arrived in. From here, take the urine samples, the frozen saliva, and the requestion form and place them all back in the kit box. Place the kit box in the return envelope provided and return using the provided carrier. 

Dutch Plus photo

The D.U.T.C.H cycle mapping test is the most extensive test provided, with 25 urine samples needed. Due to the fact that this test is for cycle mapping, the collection time frame will be one entire cycle. To start, the patient will need to identify the type of cycle they have ( less than 24 days (normal) long (34 days or more) or no cycle). When the patient opens this kit, they will see an instruction book, 25 urine collection cards, a requestion form, a clear bag, and an envelope.

Day one of the patient’s cycle is the first day of full menstrual flow. The collections for this test will begin on the seventh day and the last four samples will be collected on the fourth day of the patient’s next menstrual cycle. Inside the instruction book, the patient will find an easy to use collection schedule to keep track of their samples.

The ideal time to collect samples throughout this test is upon waking. This will give the lab the most concentrated urine, making the results more conclusive. The patient will collect their sample every morning for day 7 through day 36. Once collected, the patient will leave the urine sample out to dry for 24 hours before putting it in the clear bag provided. It is important for the patient to write the date of the sample on the collection schedule included in the kit. 

The final four samples (22-25) are all to be collected on the same day. Sample 22 should be taken within 10 minutes of waking. Sample 23 is to be taken two hours after waking. Sample 24 should be collected at dinnertime and the patient should not have any fluids two hours before this sample. The final sample should be collected at the patient’s bedtime (approximately 10pm). 

Once the patient has collected all of the samples and let them dry for 24 hours, they are to be placed in the clear plastic bag that was provided in the kit. Next, the patient is to place the clear bag full of samples, the completely filled out collection schedule, and the requisition form in the envelope provided in the kit. Finally, place 8 stamps on the indicated corner and send it off to the lab! 

 

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When sent to the lab as you can see above, these urine samples will be dry. Studies show that dried urine samples will give an accurate representation of the hormone and are stable for weeks. From here, the outcomes are gone over on a team call that includes the patient’s physician and clinicians at Precision Analytical. This helps to ensure that the treatment protocol is created specifically to fit the patients needs.  

Testing is now able to be done by using top of the line integrative techniques. There are numerous reasons and advantages for an individual to complete a hormone evaluation. These tests have the capability to help a patient understand their cycle, testosterone levels, estrogen levels, why they are tired upon waking, throughout there day, and much more.

 

 

Hormone imbalances can affect anyone. People tend to associate hormone imbalance with those who are aging, but in reality, it can affect anyone of any gender or age! It might seem like a hassle at first to compelete these tests, but in reality, they are very simple and provide a great deal of information! The symptoms are common and should be discussed with a healthcare practitioner. October is Chiropractor Health Month and our office can help if you are an individual who has these symptoms. Our office implements the D.U.T.C.H test, which allows us a hassle free and easy way to let us help you get back to feeling how you used to. – Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Functional Endocrinology: Essential Fatty Acids in Hormones

Functional Endocrinology: Essential Fatty Acids in Hormones

All fats, including saturated fatty acids, have very important roles in the body. The most important fats are the ones that the body can’t make and must be coming from the foods that a person eats.  Essential fatty acids are lipids that are involved in various biological processes and produce many compounds when they are metabolized in the body. The two primary EFAs (essential fatty acids) are linoleic acid (Omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (Omega-3). These two omegas are essential for the body since they are consumed from dietary sources because the body does not have the ability to synthesize them and EFAs are synthesized into prostaglandins, which are necessary for proper hormone signaling in the body.

Omega-6

olive-oils

Omega-6 fatty acids or linoleic acid are polyunsaturated fatty acids that are primarily used for energy and can be converted into longer omega-6 fats called ARA (arachidonic acid). ARA are used to produce eicosanoids, but they are prone to be more pro-inflammatory. Studies have shown that pro-inflammatory eicosanoids are important chemicals in the immune systems, however, when there are too many to produce, they can increase inflammation and inflammatory diseases in the body.

Researchers state that even though omega-6 fats are essential for a healthy body, the modern Western diet is making individuals consume more omega-6 fatty acids than the recommended amount. In a regular healthy diet, the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3s is 4:1 or less. In a Western diet however, the ratio is between 10:1 and 50:1.

Even though, an individual should consume the recommended amount of omega-6 fatty acids, research has shown that omega-6 fatty acids can lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases and treat symptoms that cause chronic diseases. In certain oils that contains omega-6 fatty acids, GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), which is an anti-inflammatory component and when consumed it converts to DGLA (dihomo-gamma-linolenic acids), which has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties against cancer.

A study has shown that when an individual takes a high dose of GLA in their diet, it can significantly reduce a number of symptoms caused by rheumatoid arthritis, and another study found that taking GLA supplements with a breast cancer drug is more effective in lowering breast cancer.

Omega-3

omega3-foods

Just like omega-6 fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fats that play important roles in providing a number of health benefits for a functional body. Omega-3 fatty acids contain three important compounds that are found in foods, they are ALA (alpha-linolenic acid); which converts into energy for the body, DHA (docosahexaenoic acid); which is the key component for a functional brain and retina, and lastly, EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid); which has cardiovascular benefits including lowering serum triglyceride and non-HDL-C (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) in the body.

When it comes to those three important components in omega-3s, ALA is mainly found in plants, while DHA and EPA are found in mostly animal products and algae. What makes these three components work well in the omega-3 supplements is that they are a crucial part of the human cell membrane and improve heart health, support mental health, decrease liver fats and fight inflammation.

With omega-3 fatty acids, lots of people don’t consume it as much as omega-6, due to not eating a lot of fatty fish as often and consuming omega-6 through fried food being cooked in refined vegetable oils. To balance a healthy diet, individuals can take an omega-3 supplement to balance out the omega-6 consumption to make sure the body is receiving these fatty health benefits.

Prostaglandins

Prostaglandins are a component of this regulatory system, they affect multiple hormone synthesis and secretion pathways in the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. They are a group of endogenously occurring acidic lipids that appear to play a role in the reproductive physiology.

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Since prostaglandins are bioactive lipids, they exert an autocrine or paracrine function by binding to specific GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) to activate intracellular signaling and gene transcription. As key regulators of reproductive processes, prostaglandins has many functions like having a role in the hypothalamic and pituitary control of gonadotropin secretion, ovulation, in luteinization and in the corpus luteum regression.

Prostaglandins also play a key role in the inflammatory response in the body. Their biosynthesis is significantly increased in inflamed tissues and can contribute to the development of the cardinal signs of acute inflammation in the body.

Researchers stated that prostaglandins have a plethora of actions in the central nervous system that can affect the progress of inflammation in the body differently, however, further studies are being tested to inhibit the role of these lipid mediators.

Conclusion

All fats play a very important role in the body. Essential fatty acids produce many compounds in the body when they are being metabolized in the body. Since the body can not produce essential fatty acids, they have to be consumed through food. The two important essential fatty acids are omega-6 and omega-3. These two fatty supplements help the body gain the nutrients the body needs to synthesize. Prostaglandins are also a key role in the body since they affect the pathways in the hypothalamus-pituitary axis and plays the role of regulating the reproductive physiology. Some products are formulated to target the immune support by creating micronized structure to increase the surface-to-volume ratio of particles to be more available to enzymatic actions.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s proclamation on our website to get full details on this declaration.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Bardin, T P. “The Role of Prostaglandins in Reproductive Physiology.” The Ohio State Medical Journal, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 1970, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4918753.

Behrman, H R. “Prostaglandins in Hypothalamo-Pituitary and Ovarian Function.” Annual Review of Physiology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1979, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/373605.

Brinton, Eliot A, and R Preston Mason. “Prescription Omega-3 Fatty Acid Products Containing Highly Purified Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA).” Lipids in Health and Disease, BioMed Central, 31 Jan. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28137294.

Calder, Philip C. “n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Inflammation, and Inflammatory Diseases.” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16841861.

Di Pasquale, Mauro G. “The Essentials of Essential Fatty Acids.” Journal of Dietary Supplements, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22435414.

Dinan, Timothy, et al. “Investigating the Inflammatory Phenotype of Major Depression: Focus on Cytokines and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.” Journal of Psychiatric Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18640689.

Gibson, Robert A, et al. “Conversion of Linoleic Acid and Alpha-Linolenic Acid to Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (LCPUFAs), with a Focus on Pregnancy, Lactation and the First 2 Years of Life.” Maternal & Child Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Apr. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21366864.

Guesnet, Philippe, and Jean-Marc Alessandri. “Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) and the Developing Central Nervous System (CNS) – Implications for Dietary Recommendations.” Biochimie, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20478353.

Gunnars, Kris. “What Are Omega-3 Fatty Acids? Explained in Simple Terms.” Healthline, 23 May 2019, www.healthline.com/nutrition/what-are-omega-3-fatty-acids.

Innes, Jacqueline K, and Philip C Calder. “Omega-6 Fatty Acids and Inflammation.” Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29610056.

Jabbour, H N, and K J Sales. “Prostaglandin Receptor Signalling and Function in Human Endometrial Pathology.” Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism: TEM, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15380812.

Kapoor, Rakesh, and Yung-Sheng Huang. “Gamma Linolenic Acid: an Antiinflammatory Omega-6 Fatty Acid.” Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17168669.

Kenny, F S, et al. “Gamma Linolenic Acid with Tamoxifen as Primary Therapy in Breast Cancer.” International Journal of Cancer, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 Mar. 2000, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10699943.

Khanapure, Subhash P, et al. “Eicosanoids in Inflammation: Biosynthesis, Pharmacology, and Therapeutic Frontiers.” Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2007, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17305573.

Kim, Kyu-Bong, et al. “α-Linolenic Acid: Nutraceutical, Pharmacological and Toxicological Evaluation.” Food and Chemical Toxicology : an International Journal Published for the British Industrial Biological Research Association, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24859185.

M.Shewchuk, Brian. “Prostaglandins and n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Regulation of the Hypothalamic–Pituitary Axis.” Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, Churchill Livingstone, 28 Sept. 2014, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0952327814001495.

Parker, Helen M, et al. “Omega-3 Supplementation and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.” Journal of Hepatology, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (UK), Apr. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22023985.

Petersen, Martin, et al. “Effect of Fish Oil versus Corn Oil Supplementation on LDL and HDL Subclasses in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.” Diabetes Care, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2002, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12351465.

Ph.D., Catharine Paddock. “Could Omega-6 Fatty Acids Help Us Live Longer?” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 20 Mar. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321266.php.

Robertson, Ruairi. “Omega-3-6-9 Fatty Acids: A Complete Overview.” Healthline, 15 Jan. 2017, www.healthline.com/nutrition/omega-3-6-9-overview.

Simopoulos, Artemis P. “The Importance of the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio in Cardiovascular Disease and Other Chronic Diseases.” Experimental Biology and Medicine (Maywood, N.J.), U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18408140.

Wang, Xiaoping, et al. “Multiple Roles of Dihomo-γ-Linolenic Acid against Proliferation Diseases.” Lipids in Health and Disease, BioMed Central, 14 Feb. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3295719/.

Weylandt, Karsten H, et al. “Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: The Way Forward in Times of Mixed Evidence.” BioMed Research International, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4537707/.

Zurier, R B, et al. “Gamma-Linolenic Acid Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Arthritis and Rheumatism, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Nov. 1996, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8912502.

Functional Endocrinology: Understanding Hormones From the Pituitary to the Receptor Sites

Functional Endocrinology: Understanding Hormones From the Pituitary to the Receptor Sites

The body secretes and circulates 50 different hormones to different organs in the body. Hormones are the chemical substances that coordinate the activities of living organism growth. They are secreted through the endocrine glands and travel through the bloodstream to different organs in the body to function properly. When there is an excessive quantity or an reduced quantity of hormones being produced, it can cause the body to malfunction and develop chronic illnesses.

The Pituitary Gland Functions

In neuroendocrinology, an endocrine gland can’t make a hormone without activation from a pituitary-stimulating hormone. The pituitary-stimulating hormone helps regulate hormones by secreting them to the endocrine glands. The pituitary gland is known as the “master gland” since it controls the activity of the other endocrine glands and it consists of 3 parts known as the anterior, intermediate and posterior lobes.

Anterior Lobe

adenohypophysis

The anterior pituitary gland is located in the sella turcica and is controlled by the hypothalamus in the brain. It secretes a quantity of peptides and glycoprotein hormones that help regulate the growth, metabolism, reproduction and stress response. The anterior pituitary gland produces 6 hormones that circulate to their respective targets in the body.

  • ACTH (Adrenocorticotropic hormone): This hormone is a tropic hormone as it regulates cortisol and androgen production to the adrenal cortex. Cortisol or stress hormones stimulates the release of ACTH, while the adrenal cortex secretes glucocorticoids to the body’s metabolism.
  • GH (Growth hormone): This hormone helps regulate the body’s growth, metabolism, and composition. GH is secreted by the somatotroph cells located primarily in the lateral wings of the anterior lobe. GH can also secrete in al pulsatile fashion and can have a maximal release during a circadian rhythm at night.
  • TSH (Thyroid stimulating hormone): This hormone is involved by coordinating the signal regulation of the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and the thyroid. It requires the oxidation of dietary iodine, since iodine is absorbed through the small intestine and transported to the thyroid. After the iodine is transported it can be concentrated, oxidized and then incorporated into thyroglobulin to be formed to T4 and T3 later on.
  • LH (Luteinizing hormone): This hormone is highly important to both men and women, since it affects the sex organs and plays a role in puberty, menstruation and fertility. For women, it creates progesterone, which help regulate menstruation and supports pregnancy in the female body. For men, it creates testosterone, which helps regulates fertility, muscle mass, fat distribution, and red blood production in the male body.
  • FSH (Follicle stimulating hormone): This hormone plays an important part in the reproductive system and is responsible for ovarian follicles. For females, FSH helps produce estrogen, which is a group of sex hormones that help promote the development and maintenance of female characteristics in the human body, For males, FSH helps produce spermatogenesis and regulates sperm function in the male body.
  • Prolactin: This is a protein hormone in the anterior lobe. It has the ability to promote lactation to nursing mothers. It synthesizes within the pituitary gland, the central nervous system, the immune system, and the uterus.

Intermediate lobe

intermediate

The intermediate lobe is composed of a homogeneous population of the endocrine cells, the melanotrophs and secretes several bioactive peptides. It contains very few blood vessels and can be virtually avascular. The melanotrophs are richly supplied by nerve fibers that originate from the hypothalamus.

  • Melanocyte-stimulating hormone: This hormone has many functions in a diverse physiological role. It affects skin pigmentation and studies have shown that it has antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects that help decrease in nephrotoxin exposure to the body.

Posterior lobe

posterior

The posterior lobe is similar to the anterior lobe since they both control endocrine function and the body’s hormonal response to the environment. The hypothalamus receives neural signals from the brain and secretes polypeptide and neuropeptide hormones for storage in the posterior lobe until they are ready to be released. The hormones in the posterior lobe are in charge of regulating water retention and inducing uterine contractions.

  • ADH (Antidiuretic hormone): Also known as vasopressin, this hormone is a nonapeptide that is synthesized in the hypothalamus. It plays a bunch of important roles in controlling the body’s osmotic balance, regulates blood pressure, and makes sure that the kidneys are working. ADH is mainly responsible for tonicity homeostasis as they act primarily in kidneys to increase water reabsorption.
  • Oxytocin: Also known as the “love hormone”, oxytocin is also a neurotransmitter that is involved in childbirth and breast-feeding. It has benefits as a treatment for a number of conditions like depression, anxiety and intestinal problems and is produced in the hypothalamus. Studies show that females have a higher level of oxytocin than males, especially to nursing mothers with their babies.

Free-fraction Hormones

When an endocrine gland synthesizes a hormone, it is released into circulation and bound to as a protein. Hormones attach themselves to proteins but they can’t bind to hormone receptors. So what a hormone needs to do is to lose its binding protein to become a “free-fraction” hormone. Studies have stated that a fraction of a hormone that is free is called in vitro and it is equivalent to the fraction of a hormone that is free and available to be transported into tissues are called in vivo. Free-fraction hormones make up less than 1% of all circulating hormones since they don’t impact the hypothalamus-pituitary feedback loop.

Hormone Metabolites

Hormones are metabolized by hepatic and microbiome biotransformation pathways into various hormone metabolites. Hormone metabolites have their own impact on cell receptors, studies have shown that this impact is not fully understood yet but hormone metabolites are not a reflection of direct endocrine gland production but it can be metabolized in the liver as well. Hormone metabolites can bind to hormone receptors or can be eliminated by renal or fecal clearance pathways.

Conclusion

All in all, the body secretes and circulates 50 different hormones to different organs in the body. These hormones are chemically produced in the body and keep an eye on what each of the different organs is doing. It is important that the hormone receptors are functioning properly so that an individual is feeling good both inside and out. If there is a hormonal imbalance in the body, it can cause dysfunction and chronic illnesses to a person.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s proclamation on our website to get full details on this declaration.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Allen, Mary J. “Physiology, Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH).” StatPearls [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 3 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK500031/.

Clinic, Cleveland. “Overactive Pituitary Gland & Hyperpituitarism.” Cleveland Clinic, 22 Mar. 2017, my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/15173-pituitary-gland–hyperpituitarism-overactive-pituitary-gland.

Cuzzo, Brian. “Vasopressin (Antidiuretic Hormone, ADH).” StatPearls [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2 Feb. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526069/.

Ellis, Mary Ellen, and Rachel Nall. “Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Test: What It Is and Why It’s Important.” Healthline, 29 Aug. 2017, www.healthline.com/health/lh-blood-test.

Ellis, Ronald E, and Gillian M Stanfield. “The Regulation of Spermatogenesis and Sperm Function in Nematodes.” Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4082717/.

Freeman, M E, et al. “Prolactin: Structure, Function, and Regulation of Secretion.” Physiological Reviews, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2000, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11015620.

Genes, S G. “Role of the Liver in Hormone Metabolism and in the Regulation of Their Content in the Blood.” Arkhiv Patologii, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1977, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/334126.

Goyal, Shikha. “List of Important Hormones and Their Functions.” Jagranjosh.com, 12 Mar. 2019, www.jagranjosh.com/general-knowledge/list-of-important-hormones-and-their-functions-1516176713-1.

Gunawardane, Kavinga. “Normal Physiology of Growth Hormone in Adults.” Endotext [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 12 Nov. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279056/.

Hadley, M E, et al. “Biological Actions of Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.” Ciba Foundation Symposium, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1981, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6268380.

Lamacz, M, et al. “The Intermediate Lobe of the Pituitary, Model of Neuroendocrine Communication.” Archives Internationales De Physiologie, De Biochimie Et De Biophysique, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 1991, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1717055.

Lee, Heon-Jin, et al. “Oxytocin: the Great Facilitator of Life.” Progress in Neurobiology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2689929/.

M., William. “Transport of Protein-Bound Hormones into Tissues in Vivo *.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 1 Jan. 1981, academic.oup.com/edrv/article-abstract/2/1/103/2548700?redirectedFrom=fulltext.

MacGill, Markus. “Oxytocin: The Love Hormone?” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 4 Sept. 2017, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/275795.php.

MacGill, Markus. “Testosterone: Functions, Deficiencies, and Supplements.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 6 Feb. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/276013.php.

Nichols, Hannah. “Estrogen: Functions, Uses, and Imbalances.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 2 Jan. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/277177.php.

Patel, Hiran. “Physiology, Posterior Pituitary.” StatPearls [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 27 Oct. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK526130/.

Rawindraraj, Antony D. “Physiology, Anterior Pituitary.” StatPearls [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 25 Apr. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK499898/.

Researchers, Various. “Thyroid Hormone Synthesis.” Thyroid Hormone Synthesis – an Overview | ScienceDirect Topics, 2019, www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/thyroid-hormone-synthesis.

Rousset, Bernard. “Chapter 2 Thyroid Hormone Synthesis And Secretion.” Endotext [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2 Sept. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK285550/.

Seladi-Schulman, Jill. “Everything You Need to Know About Progesterone.” Healthline, 29 Apr. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/progesterone-function.

Introducing The Endocrine System in a Functional Way

Introducing The Endocrine System in a Functional Way

The endocrine system is a network of glands and organs surrounding the body. While it is similar to the nervous system, it plays a vital role in controlling and regulating many body functions, as well as using chemical messengers called hormones. Since hormones circulate throughout the entire body, each type of hormone targets specific organs and tissues. The whole system is made up of glands and organs that release hormones into the body. Each has a different function to make sure that the human body is working correctly. If there is a disruption in one of the organs, it can cause problems and possibly lead to chronic illnesses later on.

Functioning The Endocrine System

In the endocrine system, it is responsible for regulating the body through the release of hormones. These hormones are secreted by the glands that travel through the bloodstream to various organs and tissues, telling them what to do or how to function in the body properly. Some of the bodily functions are controlled by the endocrine system. This includes the body’s metabolism, growth and development, heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, appetite, and sleeping and waking cycles.

hormone

Studies have shown that the endocrine and the nervous system work closely together since the brain continuously sends instructions to the endocrine system while returning the favor, the endocrine glands receive feedback to the brain. With an intimate relationship, both methods are referred to as the neuroendocrine system. The neuroendocrine system is a mechanism where the hypothalamus maintains homeostasis, regulates reproduction, metabolism, and blood pressure. The neuroendocrine system works together with the immune system as they play an essential role in maintaining and restoring homeostasis in the body to function correctly.

The Organs of the Endocrine System

The endocrine system has a complex network of glands that secrete substances. The glands produce, store, and release throughout the body, targeting specific organs and tissues. Here are what each gland does in the endocrine system and what their functions are in the body.

Hypothalamus

hypothalamus

The hypothalamus gland is known as the master switchboard located in the center of the brain. Its role is significant because it controls and creates many hormones in the body. It also makes sure that it has to keep the body in a homeostasis state as much as possible. If the hypothalamus is not working correctly, it can cause problems for the body, and it can lead to a wide range of rare disorders.

Pituitary

Screenshot 2019-10-08 10.16.09

The pituitary gland is known as the master gland due to regulating the other endocrine glands activities. It plays an essential role by balancing hormone levels in the body, and together with the hypothalamus gland, they control the involuntary nervous system. This system helps manage the balance of the energy, heat, and water in the body. The pituitary gland also produces several hormones that can either regulate most of the other hormone glands or a direct effect on specific organs. When the endocrine glands produce too little or an excessive quantity of hormones, it can cause the body to be imbalanced.

Pineal

The pineal gland is a small, pea-shaped gland that is in the brain and is sometimes called “the third eye.” It plays a role in producing and regulates hormones in females that may affect fertility and the menstrual cycle, including producing and excreting melatonin in the body. A 2016 study suggests that melatonin can help protect against cardiovascular diseases; however, there is still more research being done about the potential function of melatonin in the body.

pineal

When the pineal gland is not producing the correct amount of melatonin, it can cause an individual to have sleep disorders and accumulate an excessive quantity of calcium in the body. One of the most prominent symptoms that can cause pineal gland dysfunction is a change in circadian rhythms. A person can disrupt their circadian rhythm either sleeping too much or too little, having restless nights, and feeling sleepy at unusual times.

Thyroid

Screenshot 2019-10-08 11.28.42

The thyroid gland a butterfly wing-shaped gland that is located in the anterior neck. It plays a huge vital role in the metabolism, growth, and development of the human body. It regulates many body functions by constantly releasing a steady amount of hormones in the bloodstream. When the thyroid produces too much or too little hormones, it can cause hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism in the body, causing many chronic illnesses in the body.

Parathyroid

The parathyroid gland is located behind the thyroid and plays a vital role in maintaining bone health, making sure the nervous system is running smoothly, and that muscles are pumping regularly. Parathyroid glands release PTH (parathyroid hormone), which regulates calcium in the bloodstream. Research shows that calcium is the only mineral in the body that has its very own dedicated regulatory gland. Calcium not only helps with bone strength, but it conducts electrical impulses in the nervous system and its energy in muscle cells. The PTH can also signal the kidneys and small intestines to save calcium from being digested.

parathyroid-gland

When the parathyroid gland produces an excessive amount or a decreased amount of PTH, it can cause hyperparathyroidism and hypoparathyroidism leading the body to have many malfunctions, including weak bones in the body.

Thymus

The thymus gland is known as “the forgotten, but very important organ.”  It produces progenitor cells, which matures into T-cells and helps the organs in the immune system to grow properly. According to an article published by the NLM (U.S. National Library of Medicine), it stated that the thymus is the primary cell donor for the lymphatic system.

thymus

One of the most common diseases that can cause thymus dysfunction is MG (myasthenia gravis), PRCA (pure red cell aplasia), and hypogammaglobulinemia. These diseases can attack the body and cause chronic illnesses in the immune system.

Adrenal

adrenal

The adrenal glands are located on the top of the kidneys and help produce sex hormones and cortisol, they even work together with the pituitary glands. When cortisol is released from the adrenal glands, it can help with the response to stress and many essential functions in the body. When abnormal signals are disrupting the number of hormones that the pituitary glands telling the adrenal glands to produce. It can cause vitamin D to unbalance and many chronic illnesses.

Pancreas

pancreas_vessels_label

The pancreas is located in the abdomen and is part of the digestive system. It produces insulin, essential enzymes, and hormones that help break down food and sends it to the small intestine. When the pancreas produces the insulin hormone, it secretes it into the bloodstream, regulating the body’s glucose levels. There are many problems if the pancreas is not functioning correctly, causing the entire body to malfunction. If the pancreas is not producing enough insulin in the body, an individual is at risk for diabetes. Another factor is the development of pancreatic cancer caused by smoking or heavy drinking. The best way to keep a healthy pancreas is to maintain a healthy balanced diet.

Conclusion

The endocrine system is a network of glands and organs that surrounds the body. Each gland sends out hormones throughout the body and transfers to the specific organs that need these hormones to function correctly. If there is a disruption in the endocrine system, it can cause the body to malfunction and develop chronic illnesses.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s declaration on our website to get full details on this proclamation.

So the mechanisms of an autoimmune disease can be either by genetics or by environmental factors that can cause an individual to have problems in their body. There are many autoimmune diseases, both common and rare, that can affect the body. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Bradford, Alina. “Parathyroid Glands: Facts, Function & Disease.” LiveScience, Purch, 5 May 2017, www.livescience.com/58980-parathyroid-glands.html.

Cherney, Kristeen. “Adrenal Glands.” Healthline, 26 July 2016, www.healthline.com/health/adrenal-glands.

Chu, Linda C, et al. “Diagnosis and Detection of Pancreatic Cancer.” Cancer Journal (Sudbury, Mass.), U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29189329.

Crosta, Peter. “Pancreas: Functions and Disorders.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 26 May 2017, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/10011.php.

Duggal, Neel. “5 Functions of the Pineal Gland.” Healthline, 7 Apr. 2017, www.healthline.com/health/pineal-gland-function.

Imrich, Richard. “The Role of Neuroendocrine System in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatic Diseases (Minireview).” Endocrine Regulations, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2002, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12207559.

Johnson, Jon. “Hypothalamus: Function, Hormones, and Disorders.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 22 Aug. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/312628.php.

Mannstadt, Michael, et al. “Hypoparathyroidism.” Nature Reviews. Disease Primers, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 31 Aug. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28857066.

N/A, Uknown. “Circadian Rhythms.” National Institute of General Medical Sciences, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Aug. 2017, www.nigms.nih.gov/education/pages/factsheet_circadianrhythms.aspx.

Rosenow, E C, and B T Hurley. “Disorders of the Thymus. A Review.” Archives of Internal Medicine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Apr. 1984, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6608930.

Seladi-Schulman, Jill. “Endocrine System Overview.” Healthline, 22 Apr. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/the-endocrine-system.

Sun, Hang, et al. “Effects of Melatonin on Cardiovascular Diseases: Progress in the Past Year.” Current Opinion in Lipidology, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Aug. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4947538/.

Tirabassi, Giacomo, et al. “Adrenal Disorders: Is There Any Role for Vitamin D?” Reviews in Endocrine & Metabolic Disorders, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27761790.

Unknown, Unknown. “How Does the Pituitary Gland Work?” InformedHealth.org [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 19 Apr. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279389/.

Unknown, Unknown. “How Does the Thyroid Gland Work?” InformedHealth.org [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 19 Apr. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279388/.

Villines, Zawn. “Pineal Gland Function: Definition and Circadian Rhythm.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 1 Nov. 2017, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319882.php.

Vorvick, Linda J., et al. “Endocrine Glands – Health Video: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia.” MedlinePlus, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 10 May 2019, medlineplus.gov/ency/anatomyvideos/000048.htm.

Yuen, Noah K, et al. “Hyperparathyroidism of Renal Disease.” The Permanente Journal, The Permanente Journal, 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27479950.

Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt, et al. “The Thymus: A Forgotten, But Very Important Organ.” Advances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine : Official Organ Wroclaw Medical University, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27627572.

5 Foods To Eat During The Cold and Flu Season

5 Foods To Eat During The Cold and Flu Season

The cold and flu season can cause havoc on a person’s body during the colder seasons. An individual can feel overly tired, congested, the body has aches and shivers, and lastly, the immune system will work overtime to help fight off the germs. When this happens, many remedies can help these symptoms when a person feels a little bit under the weather. They help the body give that extra boost to recover from cold and flu symptoms and can provide the body a chance to rest.

When anyone is starting to feel sick, an important note is to try and get as much rest as they possibly can. It can be anything like getting more sleep, scaling down on exercising, or take some time off of work to heal more quickly. In this article, here are some of the top 5 foods to help the body improve and recover from the cold and flu season, with some additional remedies to boost the immune system as well.

Soups

Screenshot 2019-09-10 12.15.43

Soups are one of the most excellent sources of feeling better during cold and flu season. They are easily digestible and helps soothe the body by containing ample waters to keep it hydrated. Water-based soups like chicken noodle, Hippocrates soup, and vegetable soup incorporates all the essential nutrients that the body needs when it is the colder season, helping to combat the flu.

Garlic

garlic

Garlic has a wide variety of health benefits that can help the body during the cold and flu season. It can help reduce the risk of heart diseases, improve mental health, and enhance the immune system. Studies have shown that whole garlic contains a compound called alliin. When garlic is chopped, chewed, or crushed, it will help boost the disease-fighting response of white blood cells in the body when they are encountering viruses that cause the common cold or flu.

Studies also stated that garlic helps support neurodegenerative health, cardiovascular health, and compromised liver functioning from excessive alcohol use. Researchers at the Toxicology, School of Public Health, Shandong University in China, have isolated the garlic compound, DADS (diallyl disulfide), as the main compound that helps protects the body from ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

Foods That Are Rich in Vitamin C

 

sliced-fruit.jpg

Foods that contain vitamin C is highly essential when it comes to battling the cold or flu. Vitamin C is a powerful, potent supplement that has antioxidants and immune system boosters that protects the body from environmental factors like reducing oxidative stress, prevent and treat respiratory and systemic infections. With vitamin C-rich foods, they contain essential minerals, vitamins, and high in flavonoids that help individuals who don’t feel like eating or preferring bland foods to consume when they are sick. Initially, they can eat vitamin C rich food by either juice or soup. Here are some delicious fruits and juices that contain a high amount of vitamin C to combat the cold and flu.

  • Guava
  • Strawberries
  • Tomato juice
  • Oranges and Orange juice

Apple Cider Vinegar

apple-cider-vinegar-royalty-free-image-614444404-1542818076

Apple Cider Vinegar can provide many minerals and enzymes that can fight off pathogens that can be caused by the common cold or flu. A 2011 study has shown that the probiotics in apple cider vinegar have an immune-boosting effect that can shorten the duration of a cold when an individual drinks apple cider vinegar. Taking apple cider vinegar with a glass of water can also help the body when it is not cold and flu season. Apple cider vinegar helps inhibits bacterial growth, can support healthy blood pressure levels in the body, as well as an excellent addition to the medicine cabinet during cold and flu season.

Ginger

Health-Benefits-of-Ginger

Ginger is a medicinal root plant that has been used for thousands of years. This root has been known to relieve motion sickness and nausea in the digestive system. Studies have shown that 70% of the immune system is found in the gut, and so it is highly essential that the digestive system in the body is working efficiently. Since ginger is made up of hundreds of compounds, some of them have potent antioxidants and can help support healthy inflammatory pathways in the body. Ginger can be found as a fresh root, dried, as an extract or oil, tinctures, capsules, and lozenges. Here are some of the foods that contain ginger to help the body fight the common cold or flu.

  • Ginger tea
  • Curry
  • Gingerbread
  • Cookies
  • Gingersnaps
  • Ginger ale

IMG_Dr_Jimenez_300_x_300_FADED“It is highly essential to stay hydrated during the cold and flu season. Ample fluids like water, coconut water, and herbal teas are the first line of defense.

Additionally, getting a good night’s sleep helps the immune system in the body recover faster. It is also essential to avoid eating foods like processed foods, alcohol, soda, fried foods, and dairy when it is cold and flu season. Since it can cause inflammation and aggravate the immune system when the body is trying to recover from being sick.”- Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Conclusion

All in all, when it is cold and flu season, people can start stocking up on these five remedies and taking antibiotics to get a head start on not getting sick. When the body does get sick, taking these remedies, getting lots and lots of rest, staying hydrated, and relaxing can ensure that the body will recover faster. Since food matters to people’s health, it’s vital to give the body the nourishment it needs for the cold and flu season.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s proclamation on our website to get full details on this declaration.

So the mechanisms of an autoimmune disease can be either by genetics or by environmental factors that can cause an individual to have problems in their body. There are many autoimmune diseases, both common and rare, that can affect the body. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Biotics Education Team, Unknown. “5 Foods to Eat During the Cold & Flu Season.” Biotics Research Blog, 16 Sept. 2019, blog.bioticsresearch.com/5-foods-to-eat-during-the-cold-flu-season.

Borlinghaus, Jan, et al. “Allicin: Chemistry and Biological Properties.” Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 19 Aug. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25153873.

Carr, Anitra C, and Silvia Maggini. “Vitamin C and Immune Function.” Nutrients, MDPI, 3 Nov. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5707683/.

Das, Arabinda, et al. “Garlic Compounds Generate Reactive Oxygen Species Leading to Activation of Stress Kinases and Cysteine Proteases for Apoptosis in Human Glioblastoma T98G and U87MG Cells.” Wiley Online Library, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 23 July 2007, onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cncr.22888.

Felman, Adam. “Antibiotics: Uses, Resistance, and Side Effects.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 18 Jan. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/10278.php.

Newman, Tim. “Congestive Heart Failure: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatments.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 3 Jan. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/156849.php.

Song, Fu-Young, et al. “The Activation of HO-1/Nrf-2 Contributes to the Protective Effects of Diallyl Disulfide (DADS) against Ethanol-Induced Oxidative Stress.” Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta (BBA) – General Subjects, Elsevier, 28 June 2013, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304416513002882.

Surh, Y J, et al. “Chemoprotective Properties of Some Pungent Ingredients Present in Red Pepper and Ginger.” Mutation Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 18 June 1998, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9675305.

Vighi, G, et al. “Allergy and the Gastrointestinal System.” Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Blackwell Science Inc, Sept. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2515351/.

Watson, Kathryn. “Apple Cider Vinegar for Colds.” Healthline, 22 Jan. 2018, www.healthline.com/health/apple-cider-vinegar-for-colds.

West, Helen. “How Garlic Fights Colds and The Flu.” Healthline, 17 Mar. 2016, www.healthline.com/nutrition/garlic-fights-colds-and-flu.

Yagnik, Darshna, et al. “Antimicrobial Activity of Apple Cider Vinegar against Escherichia Coli, Staphylococcus Aureus and Candida Albicans; Downregulating Cytokine and Microbial Protein Expression.” Scientific Reports, Nature Publishing Group UK, 29 Jan. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5788933/.

The Thyroid and Autoimmunity Connection

The Thyroid and Autoimmunity Connection

The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland that is located in the anterior neck producing T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (tetraiodothyronine) hormones. These hormones affect every single tissue and regulate the body’s metabolism while being part of an intricate network called the endocrine system. The endocrine system is responsible for coordinating many of the body’s activities. In the human body, the two major endocrine glands are the thyroid glands and the adrenal glands. The thyroid is controlled primarily by TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), which is secreted from the anterior pituitary gland in the brain. The anterior pituitary gland can stimulate or halt the secretion to the thyroid, which is a response only gland in the body.

Since the thyroid glands make T3 and T4, iodine can also help with the thyroid hormone production. The thyroid glands are the only ones that can absorb the iodine to help hormone growth. Without it, there can be complications like hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and Hashimoto’s disease.

Thyroid Influences on The Body Systems

The thyroid can help metabolize the body, such as regulating heart rate, body temperature, blood pressure, and brain function. Many of the body’s cells have thyroid receptors that the thyroid hormones respond to. Here are the body systems that the thyroid helps out.

Cardiovascular System and the Thyroid

Under normal circumstances, the thyroid hormones help increase the blood flow, cardiac output, and heart rate in the cardiovascular system. The thyroid can influence the heart’s “excitement,” causing it to have an increasing demand for oxygen, therefore increasing the metabolites. When an individual is exercising; their energy, their metabolism, as well as their overall health, feels good.

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The thyroid actually strengthens the heart muscle, while decreasing the external pressure because it relaxes the vascular smooth muscle. This results in a decrease of arterial resistance and diastolic blood pressure in the cardiovascular system.

When there is an excess amount of thyroid hormone, it can increase the heart’s pulse pressure. Not only that, the heart rate is highly sensitive to an increase or decrease in the thyroid hormones. There are a few related cardiovascular conditions listed below that can be the result of an increased or decreased thyroid hormone.

  • Metabolic Syndrome
  • Hypertension
  • Hypotension
  • Anemia
  • Arteriosclerosis

Interestingly, iron deficiency can slow the thyroid hormones as well as increase the production of the hormones causing problems in the cardiovascular system.

The Gastrointestinal System and the Thyroid

The thyroid helps the GI system by stimulating carbohydrate metabolism and fat metabolism. This means that there will be an increase in glucose, glycolysis, and gluconeogenesis as well as an increased absorption from the GI tract along with an increase in insulin secretion. This is done with an increased enzyme production from the thyroid hormone, acting on the nucleus of our cells.

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The thyroid can increase the basal metabolic rate by helping it increase the speed of breaking down, absorbing, and the assimilation of the nutrients we eat and eliminate waste. The thyroid hormone can also increase the need for vitamins for the body. If the thyroid is going to regulate our cell metabolism, there has to be an increased need for vitamin cofactors because the body needs the vitamins to make it function properly.

Some conditions can be impacted by thyroid function, and coincidentally can cause thyroid dysfunction.

  • Abnormal cholesterol metabolism
  • Overweight/underweight
  • Vitamin deficiency
  • Constipation/diarrhea

Sex Hormones and the Thyroid

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The thyroid hormones have a direct impact on ovaries and an indirect impact on SHBG (sex hormone-binding globulin), prolactin, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion. Women are dramatically more affected by thyroid conditions than men due to hormones and pregnancy. There is also another contributing factor that women share, their iodine vitals and their thyroid hormones through the ovaries and the breast tissue in their bodies. The thyroid can even have either a cause or contribution to pregnancy conditions like:

  • Precocious puberty
  • Menstrual issues
  • Fertility issues
  • Abnormal hormone levels

HPA Axis and the Thyroid

The HPA axis (Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis) modulates the stress response in the body. When that happens, the hypothalamus releases the corticotropin-releasing hormone, it triggers the ACH (acetylcholine hormone) and the ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) to act on the adrenal gland to release cortisol. Cortisol is a stress hormone that can lower inflammation and increase carbohydrate metabolism in the body. It can also trigger a cascade of “alarm chemicals” like epinephrine and norepinephrine (fight or flight response). If there is an absence of lowered cortisol, then the body will desensitize for the cortisol and the stress response, which is a good thing.

The-Hypothalamic-pituitary-interrenal-axis-of-fish-Corticotropin-releasing-hormone-CRH

When there is a higher level of cortisol in the body, it will decrease the thyroid function by lowering the conversion of the T4 hormone to T3 hormone by impairing the deiodinase enzymes.  When this happens, the body will have a less functional thyroid hormone concentration, since the body can’t tell the difference of a hectic day at work or running away from something scary, it can either be very good or horrible.

Thyroid Problems in the Body

The thyroid can produce either too much or not enough hormones in the body, causing health problems. Down below are the most commonly known thyroid problems that will affect the thyroid in the body.

  • Hyperthyroidism: This is when the thyroid is overactive, producing an excessive amount of hormones. It affects about 1% of women, but it’s less common for men to have it. It can lead to symptoms such as restlessness, bulging eyes, muscle weakness, thin skin, and anxiety.
  • Hypothyroidism: This is the opposite of hyperthyroidism since it can’t produce enough hormones in the body. It is often caused by Hashimoto’s disease and can lead to dry skin, fatigue, memory problems, weight gain, and a slow heart rate.
  • Hashimoto’s disease: This disease is also known as chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. It affects about 14 million Americans and can occur in middle-aged women. This disease develops when the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks and slowly destroys the thyroid gland and its ability to produce hormones. Some of the symptoms that Hashimoto’s disease causes are a pale, puffy face, fatigue, enlarged thyroid, dry skin, and depression.

Conclusion

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the anterior neck that produces hormones that help function the entire body. When it doesn’t work correctly, it can either create an excessive amount or decrease the number of hormones. This causes the human body to develop diseases that can be long term.

In honor of Governor Abbott’s proclamation, October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about the proposal on our website.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

America, Vibrant. “Thyroid and Autoimmunity.” YouTube, YouTube, 29 June 2018, www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=9CEqJ2P5H2M.

Clinic Staff, Mayo. “Hyperthyroidism (Overactive Thyroid).” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 3 Nov. 2018, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hyperthyroidism/symptoms-causes/syc-20373659.

Clinic Staff, Mayo. “Hypothyroidism (Underactive Thyroid).” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 4 Dec. 2018, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hypothyroidism/symptoms-causes/syc-20350284.

Danzi, S, and I Klein. “Thyroid Hormone and the Cardiovascular System.” Minerva Endocrinologica, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Sept. 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15282446.

Ebert, Ellen C. “The Thyroid and the Gut.” Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20351569.

Selby, C. “Sex Hormone Binding Globulin: Origin, Function and Clinical Significance.” Annals of Clinical Biochemistry, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Nov. 1990, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2080856.

Stephens, Mary Ann C, and Gary Wand. “Stress and the HPA Axis: Role of Glucocorticoids in Alcohol Dependence.” Alcohol Research: Current Reviews, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3860380/.

Wallace, Ryan, and Tricia Kinman. “6 Common Thyroid Disorders & Problems.” Healthline, 27 July, 2017, www.healthline.com/health/common-thyroid-disorders.

Wint, Carmella, and Elizabeth Boskey. “Hashimoto’s Disease.” Healthline, 20 Sept. 2018, www.healthline.com/health/chronic-thyroiditis-hashimotos-disease.

Integrative Testing & Hormone Imbalances

Integrative Testing & Hormone Imbalances

Hormone deficiencies and imbalances are more common than one might originally think. Research suggests that “nearly half of the women in the United States have experienced a hormone imbalance” (Grinta, 1) . However, hormone imbalance does not just affect women, “as nearly 35% of males in their seventh decade have lower testosterone levels than younger men”. (McBride, 2)  An imbalance in hormones can cause an array of symptoms and ultimately affect an individuals day to day life. 

Symptoms 

The symptoms of hormone deficiency might not be as obvious as one could imagine. Some symptoms are small and could be brushed off as stress or lack of sleep, but it is important to look at the symptoms for what they really are. “In women, low estrogen can contribute to:

  • mood swings
  • hot flashes
  • headaches
  • depression
  • trouble concentrating
  • fatigue
  • irregular or absent periods
  • increased UTI’s “

(Swns, 3) 

In men, some of the symptoms are similar to those in women, but also include:

  • decreased bone mass
  • sleep disturbances
  • decreased motivations
  • increased body fat
  • decreased muscle mass
  • hair loss
  • libido

(Wallace, 4)

Solutions 

If these symptoms are affecting an individual’s lifestyle, there are multiple steps that can be taken to diagnose the problem and ultimately reduce symptoms. In today’s medical world, practitioners are able to use integrative techniques towards functional medicine, focusing on the biochemical level. If a patient is seeking solutions, the first step taken is an extensive questionnaire. This allows the doctor to pinpoint the exact symptoms, issues, and gives an insider look as to what direction to head towards first.

An example of the questions asked are as follows:

 

 

Once the questionnaire is completed and reviewed, a lab test is needed in order to confirm and view the exact levels the hormones are at. D.U.T.C.H ( Dried Urine Test for Comprehensive Hormones) provides one of the most accurate results. To gain more insight on D.U.T.C.H and how it works, please see last week’s article, linked here.

Testing & Conclusions

Filling out the questionnaire essentially allows the practitioner to score and rate the severity of the issues. Adding the D.U.T.C.H results to the questionnaire gives the practitioner a factual level and complete understanding of their patient’s sex and adrenal hormones and metabolites.

This further allows the practitioner to diagnose (if necessary) and suggest nutraceuticals to help the patient’s hormone levels return to normal and minimize symptoms. There are many factors and systems involved when it comes to treating hormones and having tests completed that reflect the numbers that need to be adjusted is necessary. A hormone imbalance can easily take charge of an individual’s life, but now is the time to get these symptoms under control and get back to feeling like you used to!

A great place to start is to find a doctor or healthcare provider who will supply you with a full questionnaire and listen to the symptoms you’re having. This condition is fairly common and can be treated! October is Chiropractor Health Month, and we would love to see you and aid in providing treatment if you are experiencing any of these symptoms. Due to the fact that hormones can be complex and affect different body systems, we take the time to really understand and check all aspects before jumping to a conclusion. – Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Bibliography
(1) Ginta, Daniela. “What Are the Symptoms of Low Estrogen in Women and How Are They Treated.” Healthline, 31 Jan. 2017, www.healthline.com/health/womens-health/low-estrogen-symptoms.
(2) McBride, J Abram, et al. “Testosterone Deficiency in the Aging Male.” Therapeutic Advances in Urology, SAGE Publications, Feb. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4707424/.
(3) Swns. “Nearly Half of Women Have Been Affected by a Hormonal Imbalance.” New York Post, New York Post, 22 Feb. 2019, nypost.com/2019/02/22/nearly-half-of-women-have-been-affected-by-a-hormonal-imbalance/.
(4) Wallace, Ryan, and Kathleen Yoder. “12 Signs of Low Testosterone .” Healthline, 25 Apr. 2019, www.healthline.com/health/low-testosterone/warning-signs.