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Nutrition

Nutrition: Food provides people with the necessary energy and nutrients to be healthy. By eating a variety of foods, including good quality vegetables, fruits, whole-grain products and lean meats, the body can replenish itself with the essential proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals to function effectively. Nutrients include proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins,  minerals, and water. Healthy eating does not have to be hard. The key is to eat a variety of foods, which include vegetables, fruits, and whole-grains. Eat lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, and low-fat dairy products and drink lots of water. Limit salt, sugar, alcohol, saturated fat, and trans fat. Saturated fats usually come from animals. Look for trans fat on the labels of processed foods, margarines, and shortenings. Dr. Alex Jimenez offers nutritional examples as well as describes the importance of a balanced nutrition, emphasizing how a proper diet combined with physical activity can help individuals reach and maintain a healthy weight, reduce their risk of developing chronic diseases, and promote overall health and wellness. For Answers to any questions you may have please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900


Putting Magnesium on the Menu

Putting Magnesium on the Menu

Do you feel:

  • Crave sweets during the day?
  • Shaky, jittery, or have tremors?
  • Fatigue after meals?
  • Crave salt?
  • Afternoon headaches?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might have a magnesium deficiency.

Good health is one of the things to be thankful for. Unfortunately, 84 million adults in the U.S. are living with prediabetes, while another 27 to 28 million adults are affected with type 2 diabetes, so good health is not a given for everyone. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 10 million Americans have osteoporosis, and another 44 million have low bone density, putting them at an increased risk. From the body to the brain, psychological and mood issues like depression and anxiety plague people. There is something that may be beneficial for all of these issues and is a workhorse nutrient that does not get its share of the spotlight. It has been regulated to the shadows behind the flashier and more buzzworthy compounds that get recognition than this nutrient. Magnesium is the critically essential, time-tested, go-to reliable nutrient that everybody needs.

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The human body contains about 25 grams of magnesium, which is needed for over 300 enzymes to react. The data from the NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) indicated that the majority of Americans from all ages consume less that than their respective EARs (estimated average requirements) on magnesium. It is a massive problem because magnesium deficiency plays a role in hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and migraine headaches.

Magnesium and Glucose Levels

Magnesium is required for several enzymes in glycolysis, which is the first process in glucose metabolism in the body, and it may explain why it is such an essential factor for blood sugar regulation in the body. Epidemiological evidence indicates that magnesium intake is inversely correlated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Studies have shown that higher magnesium intakes may help reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes as much as 17%, and 48% of people with type 2 diabetes may have hypomagnesemia.

ThinkstockPhotos-77742505

The inverse correlations have been observed between circulating magnesium levels, fasting blood glucose, and insulin level. There is even a response to an OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) for those with type 2 diabetes. Research shows that higher magnesium intakes are also associated with reducing the risk for cardiovascular mortality, particularly in women as it is estimated that 100 mg/day increase in dietary magnesium may confer as much as 25% reduction in the risk of cardiovascular mortality. Researchers have called subclinical magnesium deficiency “principal dicer of cardiovascular disease and a public health crisis,” so naturopathic practitioners suggesting adding magnesium-rich foods to a person’s diet is beneficial to prevent magnesium deficiency from happening.

Magnesium and Mental Health

mental illness

In regards to mental health, evidence has suggested that magnesium deficiency may play a role in the etiology of depression and that high-dose supplementation of magnesium may improve this condition. Studies found that other issues that have responded favorably to magnesium supplementation include irritability, insomnia, postpartum depression, and substance abuse in the body. There is some suggestive but inconclusive evidence that indicates that magnesium supplementation may be beneficial for individuals with mild anxiety and possibly owing to its role as a natural relaxing agent.

Magnesium and Osteoporosis

osteoporosis-cropped

For osteoporosis, calcium gets all the attention when it comes to bone mineral density; however, magnesium is an essential component for the physical structure of bone density as well. There is about 60% of the body’s magnesium stored in the bones, and considering the high prevalence of suboptimal magnesium intake in North America, the concurrent high prevalence of osteoporosis is unsurprising. Concerning bone health, low magnesium status may interfere with the efficacy of vitamin D supplementation. In the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, a review was covered in which researchers affirmed that vitamin D could not be metabolized without the sufficient levels of magnesium.

Adding Magnesium-rich Food To Your Feast

With Thanksgiving coming around the corner, there is a way to bring magnesium to the holiday table. The good news is that this crucial mineral fits perfectly into Thanksgiving entertainment. People can serve mixed nuts as part of appetizers or hors d’oeuvres while their guests are socializing. Mixed nuts can provide a substantial amount of magnesium. They can be an excellent addition to turkey stuffing/dressing or a whole grain salad, which can provide even more magnesium that the body needs. Serving leafy greens like chard and spinach are reliable sources of magnesium, as well as certain beans like black beans and kidney beans are filled with magnesium.

Thanksgiving feast

Since nuts, seeds, and beans are high in phytic acid, which is a compound that binds to the minerals. So in order to increase the bioavailability of magnesium in these foods, soaking nuts, seeds, and beans is a traditional preparation method to neutralize some of this problematic molecule.

For dessert, adding chocolate is an excellent way to get magnesium in the body. Since the cocoa powder is a rich source of magnesium, research has been speculating that the chocolate cravings might be the body’s way of crying for magnesium. Not to mention, when foods are much higher in magnesium, they are not the usual subjects for intense cravings like chocolate.

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“So for Thanksgiving, adding magnesium-rich foods can help cut back the sodium and carb intake of the holiday feast can be beneficial to your body to function correctly and good for your health.”-Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Conclusion

Magnesium is an excellent and beneficial nutrient for anyone to add to their Thanksgiving dinner. The nutrient plays many roles in the body like regulating blood sugar, improving mental health as a natural relaxing agent, and preventing osteoporosis from occurring. Adding this nutrient and some products can help the body metabolize and stable the blood sugar levels to their normal range for beneficial results.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Boyle, Neil Bernard, et al. “The Effects of Magnesium Supplementation on Subjective Anxiety and Stress-A Systematic Review.” Nutrients, MDPI, 26 Apr. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5452159/.

Bruinsma, K, and DL Taren. “Chocolate: Food or Drug?” Journal of the American Dietetic Association, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 1999, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10524390.

Castiglioni, Sara, et al. “Magnesium and Osteoporosis: Current State of Knowledge and Future Research Directions.” Nutrients, MDPI, 31 July 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3775240/.

DiNicolantonio, James J, et al. “Subclinical Magnesium Deficiency: a Principal Driver of Cardiovascular Disease and a Public Health Crisis.” Open Heart, BMJ Publishing Group, 13 Jan. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5786912/.

Eby, George A, and Karen L Eby. “Rapid Recovery from Major Depression Using Magnesium Treatment.” Medical Hypotheses, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16542786.

Fang, Xin, et al. “Dose-Response Relationship between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Cardiovascular Mortality: A Systematic Review and Dose-Based Meta-Regression Analysis of Prospective Studies.” Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology: Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS), U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27053099.

Fang, Xin, et al. “Dose-Response Relationship between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.” Nutrients, MDPI, 19 Nov. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5133122/.

Higdon, Jane. “Magnesium.” Linus Pauling Institute, 14 Oct. 2019, lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/magnesium#structural-roles.

Serefko, Anna, et al. “Magnesium and Depression.” Magnesium Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 Mar. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27910808.

Spiga, Rosangela, et al. “Are Circulating Mg2+ Levels Associated with Glucose Tolerance Profiles and Incident Type 2 Diabetes?” Nutrients, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 14 Oct. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31615167.

Team, DFH. “Preparing Beans and Legumes – What to Know.” Designs for Health, 9 Oct. 2018, blog.designsforhealth.com/preparing-beans-and-legumes.

Team, DFH. “Put Magnesium on the Menu at Thanksgiving.” Designs for Health, 19 Nov. 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1151.

Team, NOF. “Https://Cdn.nof.org/Wp-Content/Uploads/2015/12/Osteoporosis-Fast-Facts.pdf.” National Osteoporosis Foundation, 2015.

Unknown, Unknown. “Diabetes Statistics.” National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 Sept. 2017, www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/diabetes-statistics.

Unknown, Unknown. “Office of Dietary Supplements – Magnesium.” NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 11 Oct. 2019, ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/#h4.

Unknown, Unknown. “Office of Dietary Supplements – Magnesium.” NIH Office of Dietary Supplements, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 11 Oct. 2019, ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Magnesium-HealthProfessional/#h7.

Uwitonze, Anne Marie, and Mohammed S. Razzaque. “Role of Magnesium in Vitamin D Activation and Function.” The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, American Osteopathic Association, 1 Mar. 2018, jaoa.org/article.aspx?articleid=2673882.

Waanders, Femke, et al. “Hypomagnesaemia and Its Determinants in a Contemporary Primary Care Cohort of Persons with Type 2 Diabetes.” Endocrine, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 24 Oct. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31650393.

Yanovski, Susan. “Sugar and Fat: Cravings and Aversions.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 1 Mar. 2003, academic.oup.com/jn/article/133/3/835S/4688015.

What You Should Know About Histamine Intolerance and Dieting

What You Should Know About Histamine Intolerance and Dieting

Do you feel:

  • Shaky, jittery, or have tremors?
  • Stomach pain, burning, or aching 1-4 hours after eating?
  • Agitated, easily upset, nervous?
  • Lightheaded if meals are missed?
  • Digestive problems subside with rest and relaxation?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might be experiencing a histamine attack on your immune system.

During an allergic response, the body’s immune system starts to react by releasing various immune compounds to protect itself from foreign substances that identify as harmful. One of these immune compounds, known as histamine, is commonly present in a variety of foods. When histamine is elevated in the body, it is due to a high dietary intake or an inability to break it down, so individuals may experience allergic symptoms from a histamine reaction.

What is Histamine?

histamine

Histamine is a compound that is formed through the metabolism of specific amino acids in the immune system. There are a variety of levels of histamine that is found naturally in the foods that people consume. It is also produced by the body where it is in specific immune cells, including mast cells and basophils. During an allergic and other immune response, histamine is released from these cells, and consuming large quantities of histamine that is over 100 mg may result in a mild adverse reaction. Studies have shown that if histamine is consumed in a higher amount that is over 1000 mg, it can lead to histamine intoxication or histamine poisoning.

What is Histamine Intolerance?

Under normal conditions, histamine is released in the body or ingested through food, and it is broken down by two enzymes: HNMT (histamine-N-methyltransferase) and DAO (diamine oxidase). High levels of histamine can occur in individuals that have reduced activity of these enzymes. When histamine levels are increased, or the ability to break down histamine is impaired, individuals may experience histamine intolerance, which will generally present itself as an allergic reaction to the immune system.

What Causes Histamine Intolerance?

Specific individuals may have an increased sensitivity to biogenic amines like histamine. Some factors have been associated with an increased risk of histamine intolerance, including:

  • Gastrointestinal conditions (Crohn’s disease, gastric and colon ulcers, gastritis, irritable bowel syndrome)
  • Certain health conditions (coronary heart disease, hypertension, respiratory diseases)
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Certain medications that inhibit the activity of histamine-degrading enzymes (acetylcysteine, metamizole, metoclopramide, metronidazole, verapamil)

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Mast cell conditions can increase the secretion of histamine. Since mast cells are found throughout the body, they are involved with the innate immune response as well as being the primary source of histamine in the intestines. Studies show that when specific immune receptors detect a foreign substance in the body, the mast cells secrete inflammatory compounds like histamine as a protective response. Mast cell activation is characterized by increasing plasma and urine histamine levels as well as an increased histamine metabolite in the urine. Several conditions are associated with mast cell activation, including:

  • Allergies that are mediated by IgE (immunoglobulin-E) and other hypersensitivities
  • Atopic conditions
  • Mastocytosis
  • Primary mast cell disorders

Signs and Symptoms of Histamine Intolerance

With histamine intolerance symptoms being presented as an allergic response, some of the signs and symptoms include:

  • Arrhythmia
  • Asthma
  • Diarrhea
  • Flushing
  • Headaches
  • Hypotension
  • Symptoms of rhinoconjunctivitis (nasal congestion, post-nasal drip, sneezing)
  • Pruritus (itchy skin)
  • Urticaria (hives)

Histamine-free Diet

With dietary support for histamine intolerance, it may involve a histamine-free diet. Studies have been examining the effects of four-week histamine-free diet intervention on 22 individuals that have CU (chronic urticaria). Chronic urticaria is a common skin condition that is characterized by episodes of red marks and swelling that last longer than six weeks on the body.

A study found that when it is being compared to baseline, plasma histamine levels were significantly reduced when following the diet. Additionally, USS (urticaria severity score) and (UAS), both decreased following the intervention. It means that a histamine-free diet may help improve symptoms that are associated with dietary histamine intake or histamine intolerance like chronic urticaria in the body.

Histamine-rich-foods-High-Histamine-Foods-List-conners-clinic

Research also shows that when individuals follow a histamine-reduced diet, it may increase the levels of the DAO enzyme. Research also demonstrated that when individuals followed the histamine-reduced diet for an average of 13 months, the increased levels of DAO were correlated with the degree of compliance to the diet. When high-histamine and histamine-liberated foods are eliminated, the individual’s tolerance levels can be determined by slowly reintroducing foods to test for potential reactions.

Certain foods may increase histamine levels by providing a dietary source or by liberating histamine in the body. Studies have found that it is essential to note that inconsistent levels of histamine are found in various foods and that the levels may fluctuate based on the maturity, storage, and processing of the food.

Here are the high-histamine foods to avoid on a histamine-free diet. They are:

  • Aged cheese (cheddar, gouda, parmesan)
  • Alcohol (beer, champagne, wine)
  • Certain produce (avocado, eggplant, spinach, tomato)
  • Cured meats (fermented sausage, salami)
  • Fermented vegetables (sauerkraut)
  • Fish products (dried anchovies, fish sauce)

Here are the histamine-liberating foods to avoid on a histamine-free diet as well. They are:

  • Certain fruits (citrus, pineapple, banana, strawberries, papaya)
  • Cocoa
  • Egg whites
  • Food additives (coloring, flavoring, preservatives, stabilizers)
  • Legumes
  • Licorice

Other Considerations

With methods surrounding food preparations that should be considered, researchers have suggested that people should consume food that is fresh as possible and boiled rather than frying or grilling food may help reduce the intake of biogenic amines like histamine. Studies have shown that spoiled foods have been found to have high levels of histamine, so it is essential to be mindful when consuming leftovers, especially leftover fish. There are some individuals with histamine intolerance that may benefit from taking antihistamine medication or a DAO supplement. There are also certain nutrients, including copper, vitamin B6, and vitamin C that can help support histamine degradation.

Conclusion

When the body is suffering from an allergic response, its’ immune system starts to react by sending out various immune compounds that attack harmful foreign substances. Histamine is one of the immune compounds that is produced and broken down to HNMT and DAO. Histamine can also trigger an asthma attack on individuals, while certain foods can contain high-histamine and histamine-liberating properties that can be harmful in the body. Some products use an advanced formula that helps support the immune system, targets amino acids, and supports antioxidant processes to make sure that the body is functioning correctly.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Martin, San Mauro, et al. “Histamine Intolerance and Dietary Management: A Complete Review.” Adrianaduelo, 31 Aug. 2016, www.adrianaduelo.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/2016_Histamine-intolerance-and-dietary-management.pdf.

Chung, Bo Young, et al. “Effect of Different Cooking Methods on Histamine Levels in Selected Foods.” Annals of Dermatology, The Korean Dermatological Association; The Korean Society for Investigative Dermatology, Dec. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5705351/.

Dougherty, Joseph M. “Allergy.” StatPearls [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 28 July 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK545237/.

Fong, Michael. “Histology, Mast Cells.” StatPearls [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 20 Sept. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK499904/.

Lackner, Sonja, et al. “Histamine-Reduced Diet and Increase of Serum Diamine Oxidase Correlating to Diet Compliance in Histamine Intolerance.” European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30022117.

Maintz, Laura, and Natalija Novak. “Histamine and Histamine Intolerance.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 1 May 2007, academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/85/5/1185/4633007.

Reese, Imke, et al. “German Guideline for the Management of Adverse Reactions to Ingested Histamine: Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the German Society for Pediatric Allergology and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the German Association of Allergologists (AeDA), and the Swiss Society for Allergology and Immunology (SGAI).” Allergo Journal International, Springer Medizin, 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5346110/.

Son, Jee Hee, et al. “A Histamine-Free Diet Is Helpful for Treatment of Adult Patients with Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria.” Annals of Dermatology, The Korean Dermatological Association; The Korean Society for Investigative Dermatology, Apr. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839887/.

Sánchez-Pérez, Sònia, et al. “Biogenic Amines in Plant-Origin Foods: Are They Frequently Underestimated in Low-Histamine Diets?” Foods (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 14 Dec. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306728/.

Unknown, Unknown. “Histamine Intolerance & Diet: What You Should Know.” Fullscript, 11 Nov. 2019, fullscript.com/blog/histamine-intolerance.

 

 

11 Ways To Improve Digestive Problems

11 Ways To Improve Digestive Problems

Do you feel:

  • A sense of fullness during and after meals?
  • Do digestive problems subside with rest and relaxation?
  • Diarrhea?
  • Unpredictable abdominal swelling?
  • Frequent bloating and distention after eating?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might be experiencing problems with your digestive tract. Here are some ways to improve your digestion problems naturally.

Different factors can impact a person’s digestion and overall gut health. There are things that people have control like how much sleep they are getting while the other things that are not in a person’s control like genetics and family history. If a person is experiencing stomach problems, then it might be the poor lifestyle choices that may be hurting their gut. Having a well-balanced diet and regularly exercising is good, but those are just two of the many ways to regulate digestive health.

Here are some of the lifestyles that may negatively impact the body’s gut health:

  • What a person is eating
  • Mindful of mindless eating
  • Exercise routine
  • Daily hydration
  • Sleep schedule
  • Stress and anxiety levels
  • Prescription and over the counter medications a person takes
  • Bad habits like late-night eating or excessive alcohol or tobacco use

These factors can do bodily harm and can cause the development of chronic illnesses.

11 Ways To Improve Digestive Health

Even though these factors can negatively affect a person’s digestion tract and overall gut health, there are 11 ways to help improve the digestive tract naturally and be beneficial to not only the gut but to the body.

Eating More Colorful, Plant-based and Fiber-Rich Foods

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Even though digestive issues can be challenging, avoiding certain foods and eating more plant-based and fiber-rich foods can help ease those uncomfortable symptoms. Quality nut and seeds, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes can protect against a lot of digestive disorders and promote a regular bowel movement. To avoid discomfort on the digestive tract, try avoiding certain foods that are tough on the stomach like fried, artificially processed, or acidic foods.

If a person is suffering from an upset stomach or been diagnosed with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), they might want to consider adopting an anti-inflammatory rich diet to prevent inflammation in the gut.

Consider Meal Frequency and Sizing

When a person continually snacking or tend to have three big meals a day is known as a grazer. Grazing food may not be suitable for people due to being prone to constipation. These habits can impact the person’s digestive health, and recent clinical studies have been shown that intermittent fasting can be beneficial to gut health and the whole body.

Practicing Mindful Eating

 

Sometimes overeating and eating too quickly can often lead to unpleasant indigestion symptoms such as gas and bloating. Thankfully there is an inclusive practice known as mindful eating, and it has been studied to a practical approach to reducing indigestion in the gut. Research has shown that mindful eating can reduce symptoms of IBS and ulcerative colitis.

To practice eating mindfully, keep in mind the following:

  • Turning off the tv and putting away the phones at mealtimes.
  • Taking a moment and inhale after sitting down with the plate in front of the individual. Take notice of how it smells.
  • You are taking in on how the food looks on the plate.
  • Select each bite of consciously.
  • Chew the bites of food slowly.
  • Eat slowly.
  • Take breaks, sip water, or have a quick chat in between each bite.
  • Take in the taste, texture, and temperature of every bite.
  • Take time to relax after finishing a meal.

Following these tricks and taking the time to relax and paying attention to the body before a meal may improve digestive symptoms such as indigestion and bloating.

Exercise Regularly

Instructor with fitness class performing step aerobics exercise

Exercise can help digestion. When people move their bodies on a day to day basis can affect their digestion. Since it is mostly due to its anti-inflammatory effects, exercise can have a very positive impact on the digestive system. Studies have shown that living a sedentary lifestyle can be damaging to the gut. Working out can help a person relieve their stress, enable them to maintain a healthy weight, strengthen abdominal muscles, and stimulate food to move through the large intestines.

According to research, aerobic exercises, like dancing or high interval workout classes, are particularly great by increasing the blood flow to the GI tract. Keep in mind that it is best to avoid this type of high impact exercise right after eating. If an individual has a sensitive stomach, resting for 30 minutes in between workouts and meals is the best option.

Staying Hydrated

water

Not drinking enough water is a common cause of constipation among adults and children, since lots of people often replace water with sugary alternatives. Studies have shown that people should aim to drink at least 1.5 to 2 liters of non-caffeinated beverages daily to prevent constipation, and if they exercise, they should be drinking more water.

They can also increase their water intake by eating fruits that have high water content, drinking herbal teas, and non-caffeinated beverages like flavored seltzer waters.

Trying to Get A Good Night Sleep

Not getting enough hours to sleep and poor quality sleep has been associated with several gastrointestinal diseases. Studies show that people who are sleep deprived are most likely to suffer from stomach pains, diarrhea, upset stomach, or even suffer from inflammatory bowel disease. So people need to get quality sleep as the main priority.

Practice Ways to Manage Stress

Stress can affect a person’s digestion and the gastrointestinal tract big time. When an individual is chronically stressed out, their body is continuously in a flight or fight mode. Being chronically stressed out can lead to several unpleasant digestive symptoms such as constipation, diarrhea, bloating, IBS, and stomach ulcers.

There are ways to relieve stress through stress management techniques like yoga, acupuncture, cognitive behavioral therapy, and meditation. Research shows that these techniques have been shown to improve symptoms in people with IBS drastically. Even taking the time to sit quietly and practicing breathing exercises for five minutes can help alleviate stress levels.

Cutting Back on Drinking Alcohol

alcohol

Many individuals experience diarrhea and several other unpleasant symptoms after consuming alcohol. This is because alcohol can trigger some severe changes in the digestive system. Studies have mentioned that when the gastrointestinal tract comes in contact with alcohol, it becomes inflamed. This is because the intestines do not absorb water as efficiently, causing the overall digestion to speed up, and the good/harmful bacteria balance is thrown off.

Stop Smoking

Smoking can impact the entire body, including the gut. Studies have shown that smoking, chewing, and vaping tobacco has been linked to several common disorders in the digestive system, such as heartburn, peptic ulcers, and GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). Smoking can also worsen gastrointestinal symptoms in other conditions like Crohn’s disease. When a person quits smoking, it can quickly reverse some of the effects of smoking on the digestive system and can keep the symptom of some gastrointestinal diseases from becoming worse.

Consider Taking Supplements

Taking dietary supplements is a great way to make sure that the body is getting the nutrients it needs for proper digestion.

  • Probiotics are excellent digestive supplements to alleviate and improve symptoms of gas, to bloat, and stomach pains for people with IBS.
  • Glutamine is an amino acid that supports gut health. Studies show that glutamine can reduce leaky gut in people who are sick.
  • Zinc is a mineral that is essential for a healthy gut. When a person has a deficiency in zinc, it can lead to a variety of unpleasant digestive disorders. So taking zinc supplements can be beneficial to reducing digestive problems.

Be Aware of Medication Interactions and Their Side Effects

The medication that a person is taking can cause stomach discomfort and make them prone to diarrhea or constipation. Conventional medication such as aspirin and other pain medicine have been studied to upset the lining of the stomach, causing damage to the intestinal permeability.

Conclusion

Practicing these 11 ways can be beneficial and provide improvement to a person’s digestive tract. When disruptive factors disrupt the digestive tract, it can lead the body to have inflammation, leaky gut, and digestive problems. Some products are specialized to support the gastrointestinal tract and provide support to the body’s metabolism to make sure the body is functioning correctly.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

Ali, Tauseef, et al. “Sleep, Immunity and Inflammation in Gastrointestinal Disorders.” World Journal of Gastroenterology, Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited, 28 Dec. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3882397/.

Bilski, Jan, et al. “Can Exercise Affect the Course of Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Experimental and Clinical Evidence.” Pharmacological Reports: PR, US National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27255494.

Bischoff, Stephan C. “’Gut Health’: a New Objective in Medicine?” BMC Medicine, BioMed Central, 14 Mar. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3065426/.

Catterson, James H, et al. “Short-Term, Intermittent Fasting Induces Long-Lasting Gut Health and TOR-Independent Lifespan Extension.” Current Biology: CB, Cell Press, 4 June, 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5988561/.

Chiba, Mitsuro, et al. “Recommendation of Plant-Based Diets for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.” Translational Pediatrics, AME Publishing Company, Jan. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6382506/.

Didari, Tina, et al. “Effectiveness of Probiotics in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Updated Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis.” World Journal of Gastroenterology, Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 14 Mar. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25780308.

Konturek, Peter C, et al. “Stress and the Gut: Pathophysiology, Clinical Consequences, Diagnostic Approach, and Treatment Options.” Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology: an Official Journal of the Polish Physiological Society, US National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22314561.

Kristeller, Jean L, and Kevin D Jordan. “Mindful Eating: Connecting With the Wise Self, the Spiritual Self.” Frontiers in Psychology, Frontiers Media SA, 14 Aug. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6102380/.

Lakatos, Peter Laszlo. “Environmental Factors Affecting Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Have We Made Progress?” Digestive Diseases (Basel, Switzerland), US National Library of Medicine, 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19786744.

Miller, Carla K, et al. “Comparative Effectiveness of a Mindful Eating Intervention to a Diabetes Self-Management Intervention among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: a Pilot Study.” Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, US National Library of Medicine, Nov. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3485681/.

Mottaghi, Azadeh, et al. “Efficacy of Glutamine-Enriched Enteral Feeding Formulae in Critically Ill Patients: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.” Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, US National Library of Medicine, 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27440684.

Oettlé, G J. “Effect of Moderate Exercise on Bowel Habit.” Gut, US National Library of Medicine, Aug. 1991, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1885077.

Philpott, HL, et al. “Drug-Induced Gastrointestinal Disorders.” Frontline Gastroenterology, BMJ Publishing Group, Jan. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5369702/.

Popkin, Barry M, et al. “Water, Hydration, and Health.” Nutrition Reviews, US National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2010, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2908954/.

Qin, Hong-Yan, et al. “Impact of Psychological Stress on Irritable Bowel Syndrome.” World Journal of Gastroenterology, Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 21 Oct. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4202343/.

Skrovanek, Sonja, et al. “Zinc and Gastrointestinal Disease.” World Journal of Gastrointestinal Pathophysiology, Baishideng Publishing Group Inc, 15 Nov. 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25400994.

Unknown, Unknown. “11 Ways To Improve Digestion Problems Naturally.” Fullscript, 9 Sept. 2019, fullscript.com/blog/lifestyle-tips-for-digestive-health.

Unknown, Unknown. “Smoking and the Digestive System.” National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, US Department of Health and Human Services, 1 Sept. 2013, www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/smoking-digestive-system.

Wong, Ming-Wun, et al. “Impact of Vegan Diets on Gut Microbiota: An Update on the Clinical Implications.” Ci Ji Yi Xue Za Zhi = Tzu-Chi Medical Journal, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6172896/.

 

 

Health Coaching in El Paso: Part 3

Health Coaching in El Paso: Part 3

Health coaches are becoming more and more crucial as modern medicine continues to improve. Now more than ever, the health care field is progressing at high speeds and professionals do not always have the available time some patients desire. Here is where health coaches become involved. Basically, the position of a health coach was produced to fill the emptiness in several doctor offices. Many physicians contribute but do not have the time or resources to assist each individual and aid in constructing healthy habits on a day to day basis. However, health coaches are available to be a supportive mentor that assists and guides patients in making healthy lifestyle changes. Many patients who seek help to change their lifestyle are those suffering from some kind of chronic pain, headaches, or joint inflammation.

In the previous weeks, we have defined and explained what a health coach is and what they really do, as well as the first two steps a health coach might take with a patient. Throughout this article, the third and fourth steps will be broken down and analyzed.

Need a refresher? No problem!

Health Coaching in El Paso: Part 1 can be found by clicking here

Health Coaching in El Paso: Part 2 can be found by clicking here

 

Step 3: Building A Plan For Action

 

 

Once the health coach understands the values and goals of the patient, a plan for change can get mapped out. One thing that is unique about building a plan, is that the health coach encourages the patient to have a say in it and contribute to building the plan. The ways of medicine have changed, and this aspect is one of them. Before, many patients would sit silently as doctors instructed them on their new protocol. However, it has been shown that patients who build a plan of action with the practitioner, are more likely to comply and complete a program.

In addition to this, the perspective of the patient can help maintain expectations and keep the plan of action at a realistic timeline. The health coach will offer their suggestions during this process as well as their perspective. Often times, this will help the patient break down their overall goal, into smaller more specific goals or tasks.

As soon as the overall goals are broken down into specific tasks, the health coach will then map out the process to complete these tasks. It can be simple to overlook small steps when thinking of a bigger picture, so the health coach will provide tools to better help the patient understand.

An example of this would be for a patient who wants to lose weight. Mapping out these tasks will have an end result that looks similar to these:

• I will try a new fruit and vegetable every day this week and identify what I enjoy

• I will think of different, creative ways to work movement into my day, such as finding a walking trail in my neighborhood

• I will always keep a water bottle with me and refill it every two hours

• I will cook dinner two nights this week

• I will go for a walk after dinner every day this week

By providing the patients with these smaller tangible tasks, the patient now has “homework” in a sense to complete these throughout the week. The health coach will set a deadline with these tasks and check-in with the patient regularly to ensure they are on track.

Step 4: Tracking Progress And Results

 

Goals achieved.jpg

 

Before progress can be tracked, the health coach will take into consideration the patient’s goal and determine how often the patient will need to come in for follow-ups. For many patients, a combination of follow up techniques are used. Health coaches understand that in-person is not always the most convenient and does not always fit into the patient’s schedule. If this is the scenario, health coaches work around that to create follow-ups by using some in-person visits, some phone conversations, or other virtual check-in meetings that are HIPAA compliant.

Often times, during a lifestyle change patients may become confused or discouraged. It is important to remember that this is normal and progress is not always a straight line up, but rather includes bumps along the way. In order to better help the patient, the health coach will provide them with a helpful “where to turn” guide.

As humans, at different times we require different types of support. The where to turn guide will be a supporting reminder of things to do to counteract these feelings when they arise. Items included in this guide will be ideas such as:

• Pursuing a hobby, like dancing or playing an instrument

• Getting out in nature

• Starting a mindfulness practice

• Making art, like drawing or writing

• Joining a community, religious, or spiritual group

In addition to these activities, the health coach will determine with the patient what kind of support (internal or external) is appropriate depending on the situation.

Lastly,  progress does not always look like a dip in the number on the scale. Progress can come in many different forms. In order to help the patient appreciate and realize all the progress they are making, a health coach will ask questions like:

1. How can you appreciate your progress?

2. How would you describe the benefits of your experience?

3. What’s been good about this experience?

4. How have you grown?

As mentioned earlier, a health coach is important to have as they help one realize all the steps it truly takes to be successful and reach their health goals. There are many critical steps that are easily overlooked when the big picture is on their minds. The final two steps that a health coach will work on with a patient is to help them visualize their best self and to create a plan for resiliency. These two topics will be discussed in the next article.

 Using a health coach to complete a lifestyle change is similar to the work of going to therapy. One must be willing to accept the tools and resources they are givien, and actually do the work provided or it will not produce results. If a patient is truly serious about completing a lifestyle change, using a health coach is an extremly beneifical resource! As one can see, they work with the patients to hammer down tasks and ideas that a patient might not have orignally thought of. By utilizing a health coach, the patient has a higher chance of reaching their goals. – Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach

All information and resources for this post came from an Integrative Practioner article titled, “A Six-Step Approach To Health And Wellness Coaching: A Toolkit for Practice Implementation” and can be found by clicking here; as well as listed below in the proper bibliography.

*The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.

Bibliography:
American Psychological Association (2019). The Road to Resilience. Retrieved from: https://www.apa.org/helpcenter/road-resilience
Jonas, W. (2019). Empowering patients with chronic diseases to live healthier through health coaching: Integrative primary care case study. Samueli Integrative Health Programs. Retrieved from: https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/give-yourself-a-health-self-assessment
Miller, W. and Rose, G. (1991). Motivational Interviewing: Preparing People to Change Addictive Behavior. Guilford Publications.
Pecoraro, Wendy. “A Six-Step Approach to Health and Wellness Coaching: A Toolkit for Practice Implementation.” Official Media Integrative Practitioner, 17 Oct. 2019, www.integrativepractitioner.com/resources/e-books/a-six-step-approach-to-health-and-wellness-coaching-a-toolkit-for-practice-implementation.
Trzeciak, S. and Mazzarelli, A. (2019). Compassionomics. Studer Group. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Stages of Change.Retrieved from: http://www.cpe.vt.edu/gttc/presentations/8eStagesofChange.pdf
Your Coach (2009). SMART goals.Retrieved from: https://www.yourcoach.be/en/coaching-tools/

The Top 8 Mushrooms for Immune Health

The Top 8 Mushrooms for Immune Health

Do you feel:

  • Aches, pains, and swelling throughout the body?
  • Stomach pains, burning, or aching 1-4 hours after eating?
  • Excessive belching, burping, or bloating?
  • Inflammation in your stomach?
  • Is gas immediately following a meal?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then try these eight edible mushrooms for your immune system.

Mushrooms

Medicinal mushrooms have been traditionally used centuries for protecting anyone against infectious diseases, and various cancers. The positive biological effects of mushrooms are due in part to the indirect action of stimulating the immune cells. These mushrooms have a long history of usages by supporting health, especially in early Chinese, Egyptian, Greek, Mexican, and Roman cultures. In fact, in 1991, a 5,300-year-old mummy was discovered carrying polypore fungus, which exerts a purgative effect.  It may have been used to treat the mummies’ intestinal parasites.

Mushroom Benefits

Modern research has shown that medicinal mushrooms can provide a rich source of nutrients and bioactive compounds that are associated with a few health effects, primarily supporting the immune system. Mushrooms act as an anti-bacterial, immune system enhancer and cholesterol-lowering agents. Additionally, they are an essential source of bioactive compounds, and some mushroom extracts are used to promote human health as well as being found as dietary supplements.

Balsamic-Mushrooms-and-Onions-Culinary-Hill

Medicinal mushrooms are edible macroscopic fungi that are visible to the naked eye and are used for their beneficial health properties. Fungi, which includes yeasts molds, and mushrooms, live on the dead matter that is found in soil, plants, animals, and other fungi. It is estimated that there are 14000 to 22000 known species of mushrooms worldwide, and approximately 20 to 30 mushrooms that are cultivated edible species, while approximately 15 species are wild foraged for consumption and can be part as functional foods or dietary supplements.

Mushrooms are a source of many nutrients, including fiber, protein, selenium, potassium, and vitamins, B1, B2, B12, C, D, and E. They also possess several bioactive components like alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenes, phenolic compounds, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and polysaccharides. Mushrooms have been studied for not only its immune-stimulating and prebiotic properties, but they notably contain β- glucan, which is a polysaccharide that is commonly present in mushrooms.

Research has been examining the health effects of mushrooms and has identified approximately 130 possible therapeutic properties, including:

  • Anti-bacterial
  • Anti-diabetic
  • Anti-fungal
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-oxidants
  • Anti-parasitic
  • Anti-tumor
  • Anti-viral
  • Hepatoprotective
  • Immunomodulating

The research on medicinal mushrooms is based on animal or in-vitro trails that are up to date. Some earlier clinical trials suggested that individuals who consume mushrooms can be beneficial for reducing the risk of breast cancer and can help improve cancer-related symptoms like insomnia and sweating.  Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial effects of mushrooms for immune health. Certain mushrooms can positively influence the gut microbiota by improving the protection against pathogens. There are even several mushrooms that have been shown to support immune health by enhancing the innate and adaptive immune responses as well as suppressing the immune response, thereby exerting anti-allergic effects.

The Top 8 Mushrooms

Here are the top 8 mushrooms that have immune supportive properties.

Chaga (Inonotus obliquus)

Chaga-chunk

The Chaga mushroom is also referred to as birch mushroom and Chaga conk. It is a dark brown and black fungus that often grows on birch trees. Several compounds are found in Chaga, with its beneficial effects that contain anti-oxidant polyphenols, betulin, and betulinic acid that are associated with anticancer effects.

Studies show that the Chaga mushrooms are used in traditional medicine for different therapeutic indications, such as using it as an anthelminthic, as an antitubercular, to cure digestive disorders (gastritis, ulcers, etc.), or even to prevent cardiac or hepatic illnesses.

Cordyceps (Ophiocordyceps Sinensis)

cordyceps-militaris

Even though cordyceps is not technically a mushroom, this rare caterpillar fungus grows only in high-altitude regions of Sikkim, a state in northeast India. Studies found that the bioactive components in cordyceps include polysaccharides, cordycepin, and cordycepic acid. Cordyceps was described in old Chinese medical books in ancient times and used by traditional healers to improve energy, appetite, stamina, libido, endurance, and sleeping patterns.

In an eight week study, healthy Koreans individuals took supplements that contain cordyceps extract, and the results were that with the cordyceps extract, it increased the activity of NK-cells (natural killer immune cells). This change was accompanied by improving the immune regulation in the body.

Lion’s Mane (Hericium Erinaceus)

lion's mane

Also known as Hericium Erinaceus, the lion’s mane mushroom has a white, fur-like appearance and may promote beneficial gut microbiota growth and be associated with reducing colon tissue damage from inflammatory bowel disease.

Researchers suggested that lion’s mane may help individuals regulate their immune system and can improve the health of those who have IBD, but there is still more research being done to confirm this finding.

Maitake (Grifola frondosa)

1296x728_Maitake_Mushroom

Maitake is both a culinary and medicinal mushroom that has proven to have anticancer activity on breast cancer, melanoma, and hepatoma cells. Maitake has a component called proteoglycan, and it has been associated with the immune-simulating effects.

Studies have been shown that proteoglycan can decrease mammary tumor cell behavior in mice, and research shows that maitake can exert anti-viral activity against hepatitis B and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus.)

Oyster (Pleurotus)

oyster mushroom

Oyster mushrooms are a genus of fungi that has serval species like Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus florida.  Research has found that polysaccharides that are present in P. ostreatus mushrooms can activate N.K. cells against lung and breast cancer cells. Another research shows that an extract of P. florida contains several active components like phenolics, flavonoids, and polysaccharides having anti-inflammatory analgesic effects in animal models.

Reishi (Ganoderma lingzhi)

reishi_elixir_immortality

Known as the “king of mushrooms” or the “mushrooms of immortality,” reishi has been shown to prevent or treat various diseases and modulate inflammation that is associated with a high cholesterol diet on people.

The health effects of this mushroom may be a result of its ability to regulate microbiota composition in the body, as the polysaccharides that are found in reishi demonstrates prebiotic effects and may increase the beneficial bacteria in a person’s body.

Shiitake (Lentinula edodes)

dried-shiitake-mixa-getty-56a5d1bd3df78cf77289fef7

Shiitake mushrooms have been traditionally used to treat reasonable conditions like the common cold. Studies have shown that people who consume shiitake were associated with favorable changes in secretion patterns of various immune compounds and that the changes caused by consuming shiitake mushrooms can improve the gut immunity and anti-inflammatory response.

As with many mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms have anticancer effects and contains a glucan called lentinan that is being currently used as a complementary treatment for tumors, especially in China and Japan.

Turkey Tail (Coriolus Versicolor)

turkey tail

The turkey tail mushroom gets its name from the tan and brown rings on its surface, and its appearance is similar to the tail feathers of a turkey. Research has shown that in traditional medicine, the turkey tail mushroom has been used to therapeutically to treat fungal infections, cancer, and AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.) Turkey tail mushrooms have PSK (polysaccharide-K)  and have been used as a complementary cancer treatment

A 2007 study that was conducted by the Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine in Japan found that over 8,000 patients that took turkey tail and combined it with chemotherapy have increased the survival rate of patients following gastric cancer resection.

Conclusion

Mushrooms have been used for a long time to prevent infectious diseases and various cancers from coming into the body. With its many health benefits for immune support, it can be beneficial to provide anti-inflammatory properties. Certain mushrooms are edible while others are poisonous in the wild, so consuming these eight mushrooms are safe for people. Combining these mushrooms and some products are beneficial in supporting the immune system and are designed for more excellent stability, bioavailability, and digestive comfort.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Our office has made a reasonable attempt to provide supportive citations and has identified the relevant research study or studies supporting our posts. We also make copies of supporting research studies available to the board and or the public upon request. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.


References:

El-Deeb, Nehal M, et al. “Modulation of NKG2D, KIR2DL and Cytokine Production by Pleurotus Ostreatus Glucan Enhances Natural Killer Cell Cytotoxicity Toward Cancer Cells.” Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, Frontiers Media S.A., 13 Aug. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6700253/.

Feeney, Mary Jo, et al. “Mushrooms and Health Summit Proceedings.” OUP Academic, Oxford University Press, 8 May 2014, academic.oup.com/jn/article/144/7/1128S/4569770.

Ganeshpurkar, Aditya, and Gopal Rai. “Experimental Evaluation of Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Potential of Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus Florida.” Indian Journal of Pharmacology, Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd, 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3608298/.

Géry, Antoine, et al. “Chaga ( Inonotus Obliquus), a Future Potential Medicinal Fungus in Oncology? A Chemical Study and a Comparison of the Cytotoxicity Against Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells (A549) and Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells (BEAS-2B).” Integrative Cancer Therapies, SAGE Publications, Sept. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6142110/.

He, Yanli, et al. “Grifola Frondosa Polysaccharide: A Review of Antitumor and Other Biological Activity Studies in China.” Discovery Medicine, 23 Apr. 2018, www.discoverymedicine.com/Yanli-He/2018/04/grifola-frondosa-polysaccharide-antitumor-and-other-biological-activity-studies-in-china/.

Integrative, PDQ, and Alternative and Complementary Therapies Editorial Board. “Medicinal Mushrooms (PDQ®).” PDQ Cancer Information Summaries [Internet]., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 30 Nov. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK401261/.

Jayachandran, Muthukumaran, et al. “A Critical Review on Health Promoting Benefits of Edible Mushrooms through Gut Microbiota.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, MDPI, 8 Sept. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5618583/.

Jung, Su-Jin, et al. “Immunomodulatory Effects of a Mycelium Extract of Cordyceps (Paecilomyces Hepiali; CBG-CS-2): a Randomized and Double-Blind Clinical Trial.” BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, BioMed Central, 29 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441223/.

Lindequist, Ulrike, et al. “Medicinal Mushrooms.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: ECAM, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4095656/.

Lindequist, Ulrike, et al. “The Pharmacological Potential of Mushrooms.” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: ECAM, Oxford University Press, Sept. 2005, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1193547/.

Oba, Koji, et al. “Efficacy of Adjuvant Immunochemotherapy with Polysaccharide K for Patients with Curative Resections of Gastric Cancer.” Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy: CII, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (U.K.), June 2007, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17106715.

Panda, Ashok Kumar, and Kailash Chandra Swain. “Traditional Uses and Medicinal Potential of Cordyceps Sinensis of Sikkim.” Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine, Medknow Publications Pvt Ltd, Jan. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3121254/.

Valverde, María Elena, et al. “Edible Mushrooms: Improving Human Health and Promoting Quality Life.” International Journal of Microbiology, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4320875/.

Wasser, Solomon P. “Medicinal Mushroom Science: Current Perspectives, Advances, Evidences, and Challenges.” Biomedical Journal, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2014, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25179726.

Zaremba, Karolina. “Top 8 Mushrooms For Immune Health.” Fullscript, 4 Nov. 2019, fullscript.com/blog/mushrooms-for-immune-health.

 

 

 

6 Supplements For Kidney Health

6 Supplements For Kidney Health

Do you feel:

  • Complicated, infrequent bowel movements?
  • Frequent urination?
  • Poor bowel function?
  • Have more than three bowel movements daily?
  • Feeling that bowels do not empty completely?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might want to consider these six supplements for your kidneys.

It is estimated that 31 million Americans have suffered from chronic kidney disease. It might be due to the misery of the production of kidney stones. It is more common that 9 out of 10 individuals that have moderately decreased kidney function will not even know that they have it. Chronic kidney disease does not get much recognition, but it does kill more people than either breast or prostate cancer.

One reason that chronic kidney disease is not on the radar for most people is that there are no symptoms until the disease is in the advanced stage. When it does appear in the body, they include a range of symptoms that can stay in the body for a long time. Since many of the symptoms do not set off the alarms in the body, it is easy to ignore them until the person is diagnosed with kidney failure. Fortunately, with a little awareness and some natural kidney support, individuals can prevent the symptoms from escalating on the body.

Good Kidney Health

The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs that are located behind the lower rib cage on either side of the spine in the body. Vital to the overall health, the kidneys filter waste and toxins out of the blood and moving them to the bladder so they can be excreted out of the body as urine. The kidneys also regulate the body’s fluid balance, the minerals balance in the bloodstream, and activating vitamin D, so that way the body can use it. The kidneys also release hormone production directly to the bloodstream and regulating blood pressure.

kidneys-1000500-TransparentWhite-1

It is essential to take the necessary steps to maintain kidney health, especially if an individual has an increased risk of chronic kidney disease. Factors can affect the body and can cause individuals to have a higher risk of chronic kidney disease. Some of these factors include:

  • Being diabetic
  • Someone in the family that has a history of kidney disease, diabetes or high blood pressure
  • Someone having some form of cardiovascular disease
  • Obesity
  • Diagnosed with chronic urinary tract infections

While some of these risks are beyond a person’s control, it is crucial to adopt a few healthy lifestyle habits and adding kidney supporting supplements to prevent the spread of chronic kidney diseases and other ailments that have damaged the kidneys in the body.

The Best Ways for Kidney Health

When optimizing kidney health, changing lifestyle habits is highly essential. While quitting smoking, moderate alcohol consumption, and increasing physical activity is beneficial for the body and can boost kidney health overall. Improving the diet is one of the most accessible lifestyle modifications anyone can make.

For decades, doctors have recommended patients with CKD, a renal diet that limits dietary potassium, and phosphorus intake. The only problem with this type of diet is that it reduced some of the essential foods like fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, and nuts. However, recent studies pointed out that well-rounded diets like the Mediterranean diet or the DASH diet are the way to go for those who are with or want to prevent CDK. With these healthier diets, they focus on whole-minimally-processed foods and low, moderate amounts of protein and as a result, they support kidney health and help reduce the risk of related health issues like high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and diabetes.

It is also a smart move to stay hydrated with fluids, especially water, since it helps clear the sodium and toxins from the kidneys.

The 6 Supplements For Healthy Kidneys

When a person is at risk for kidney disease or wants to optimize these amazing filters, these six supplements are excellent for playing a supportive role in helping the kidneys.

Alpha-lipoic acid

Alpha lipoic acid food

Alpha-lipoic acid is a powerful antioxidant that is made inside the mitochondria, where it helps key enzymes turn into nutrients and energy for the body. This antioxidant plays another crucial role by protecting the cells from oxidative damage, including those in the kidneys. A study showed that alpha-lipoic acid produces a significant uptick in two other antioxidants, SOD (superoxide dismutase) and CAT (catalase) in kidney tissue. This can help reduce inflammation and oxidative stress in the kidneys as well as preventing kidney stones from forming.

Andrographis

Andrographis-Featured-Image-v3

Andrographis is a kidney supporting herb that people do not think about when they are indulging in their favorite alcoholic beverage; however, it should be. In the Journal of Ethnopharmacology found that the two compounds that are in Andrographis, which is andrographolide and arabinogalactan proteins; help protect the kidneys from alcohol toxicity. For anyone that is enjoying a glass wine with dinner, having a beer or two with friends, or drinking the occasional cocktail, taking a dose of Andrographis before consuming alcohol can provide the protection the kidneys need.

Moringa

Can-You-Eat-Moringa-Leaves-How-Do-They-Detox-Your-Body

Moringa is a superfood that comes from the leaves of the moringa tree that is essential parts of Asia, Central and South America, Africa, and Australia. These medicinal plants have possessed the ability to protect SOD and CAT levels in the kidneys. Studies have been shown using a model of acetaminophen toxicity and found that the moringa supplementation has reversed both the oxidative damage and inflammation in the kidneys.

NAC

(R)-N-Acetylcysteine_Structural_Formulae

Also known as n-acetylcysteine, NAC is the precursor to glutathione, the body’s master antioxidant. NAC is an antioxidant in its rights by protecting the kidney cells from heavy metals and other damaging toxins. Research has shown that NAC can also limit the damage from AGEs (advanced glycation end production.) AGEs are formed when glucose reacts with the proteins in the blood vessel walls, including the blood vessels within the kidneys. The resulting damage caused by AGE includes oxidative damage that can be a contributing factor to chronic kidney disease, but proactively including NAC as part of the person’s supplement routine that can help protect the harmful effects of AGEs.

Probiotics

Probiotics

Beneficial bacteria found in probiotics can do more than just enhancing the body’s gut health. Probiotics can also help protect against the complication of CKD by decreasing inflammation and the production of uremic toxin. This dual-action helps the kidney function. Probiotics can protect the body from the leaky gut syndrome, which is a common condition people with CKD, allowing harmful bacteria to “leak” from the intestinal tract into the blood. Supplementing with probiotics can improve the bacterial balance in the gut, lessening the permeability of the intestinal barrier, and reducing the complications of CKD.

Resveratrol

Food Rich With Resveratrol, Grapes, Plums, Goji, Peanuts, Cranberry, Raspberrys, Dark Chocolate

Resveratrol is found in grapes, berries, and peanuts. Only making the headlines a few years ago, due to its heart-healthy properties and new evidence has been found that resveratrol can protect the kidneys from a variety of toxins, including heavy metals, drugs, and alcohol that can cause renal injury. This antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound can help fortify the kidneys against injury and improves renal function once the injury has occurred.

Conclusion

With these six supplements, they can provide anyone the help they need to prevent chronic kidney disease. Even though the symptoms of chronic kidney disease do not show at a later date, individuals must add these supplements to their diet and lifestyle to prevent chronic kidney disease. Some products can help with inflammation in the body system by containing collagen-based proteins and targeting amino acids that can offer support to the gastrointestinal system.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Al, H S. “Protective Effect of Resveratrol against Aluminum Chloride Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats.” Saudi Medical Journal., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Apr. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=27052279.

Albertoni, G, and N Schor. “Resveratrol Plays Important Role in Protective Mechanisms in Renal Disease–Mini-Review.” Jornal Brasileiro De Nefrologia: ‘Orgao Oficial De Sociedades Brasileira e Latino-Americana De Nefrologia., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=25923757.

Chauveau, Philippe, et al. “Mediterranean Diet as the Diet of Choice for Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.” Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation: Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association – European Renal Association, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 May 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29106612.

Cigarran, S, et al. “Gut Microbiota in Chronic Kidney Disease.” Nefrologia: Publicacion Oficial De La Sociedad Espanola Nefrologia., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=27553986.

Gallieni, Maurizio, and Adamasco Cupisti. “DASH and Mediterranean Diets as Nutritional Interventions for CKD Patients.” American Journal of Kidney Diseases: the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27884277.

Karthivashan, G, et al. “The Modulatory Effect of Moringa Oleifera Leaf Extract on Endogenous Antioxidant Systems and Inflammatory Markers in an Acetaminophen-Induced Nephrotoxic Mice Model.” PeerJ., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 7 July 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=27441110.

Ko, Gang Jee, et al. “Dietary Protein Intake and Chronic Kidney Disease.” Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27801685.

Petronilho, F, et al. “Alpha-Lipoic Acid Attenuates Oxidative Damage in Organs After Sepsis.” Inflammation., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=26431839.

Singha, P K, et al. “Protective Activity of Andrographolide and Arabinogalactan Proteins from Andrographis Paniculata Nees. against Ethanol-Induced Toxicity in Mice.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 20 Apr. 2007, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=17127022.

Unknown, Unknown. “6 Supplements That Improve Your Kidney Health.” Fullscript, 1 Oct. 2019, fullscript.com/blog/kidney-health.

Unknown, Unknown. “Facts About Chronic Kidney Disease.” National Kidney Foundation, 19 July 2019, www.kidney.org/atoz/content/about-chronic-kidney-disease.

Unknown, Unknown. “Kidney Disease Statistics for the United States.” National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1 Dec. 2016, www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/kidney-disease.

Xia, Q, et al. “N-Acetylcysteine Ameliorates Contrast‑Induced Kidney Injury in Rats with Unilateral Hydronephrosis.” Molecular Medicine Reports., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=29207099.

 

 

The Top 10 Superfoods for Inflammation

The Top 10 Superfoods for Inflammation

Do you feel:

  • Inflammation on your joints or all over the body?
  • Stomach pain, burning, or aching 1-4 hours after eating?
  • Unpredictable abdominal pain?
  • Gas immediately following after a meal?
  • Excessive belching, burping, or bloating?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then try these top ten superfoods to prevent inflammation in your body.

Superfoods lack any formal criteria, and people wonder what makes a food a superfood. Medical experts agreed that foods with the title “superfood” have health benefits that go far beyond what is listed on their nutrition labels. There is a wide range of health-promoting superfoods that can be incorporated into a person’s diet in several different ways. Eating superfood alone will not make anyone healthier overnight, but adding them to an already balanced diet can give anyone a mega-dose of added health benefits to their body.

Getting to Know Superfoods

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, a superfood is defined as “a food that rich in compounds and considered beneficial to a person’s health. It can be any foods that have antioxidants, fatty acids, or fibers in their nutrient compounds. While the Oxford Dictionary defines a superfood as “a nutrient-rich food that is considered to be especially beneficial for health and well-being.”

Here are the top ten superfoods that have been scientifically proven to help optimize the body’s ability to function correctly. These superfoods are not only super healthy, but they are affordable and readily available in the grocery stores, online, and at farmer’s markets.

Açai Berries

Açai berries are high in antioxidants. They also contain B vitamins, magnesium, potassium, healthy fats, and phosphorus. The açai berry is one of the most well-known superfoods that is beneficial for the body’s microbiome. Studies have shown that açai berries have anti-inflammatory properties, help improve the cognitive function, maintaining healthy blood sugar levels, and protect against heart diseases. The berries themselves have also been suggested to help slow down age-related memory loss in individuals.

Lecompte_Acai-berry_290519

Studies have shown that the health benefits of the açai berries are that the berries contain a range of polyphenols that protects cellular oxidative damage in vitro and can provide ant-inflammatory signaling in the body by reducing the production of free radicals by inflammatory cells. Chronic inflammation in the body can lead to diseases like fibromyalgia. So consuming this berry can help lower the risk of inflammation in the body.

Plant-based protein

Plant proteins are abundant, branched-chain containing essential amino acids, and are exceptionally high in lysine. Research has been shown that lysine can help balance blood glucose in the body. Lysine even can increase muscle strength and combat anxiety in the body.

chickpea-bowl

Plant-based proteins that contain carotenoids and flavonoids can modulate inflammatory responses in the body as well as the immunological process as well. Plant foods have anti-inflammatory potential that everyone needs in their diet to reduce inflammatory responses that is in the body.

Salmon

Salmon is a superfood that has one of the highest sources for omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to lower the risk of developing coronary heart diseases, lowers metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. Studies have been shown that fish oil has also been known to help combat late-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

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Consuming salmon or any foods that contain omega-3s may help alleviate oxidative stress that the body may have picked up. Omega-3s even play a role in lowering the risk of inflammation on individuals who have to develop fibromyalgia. Since it associates with pro-inflammatory cytokines, eating omega-3 fatty foods can help lower the inflammation and alleviate it as well.

Avocados

Avocados are a nutrient-rich superfood, high fiber fruits that play a significant role in combating chronic diseases in the body. Eating avocados regularly have been known to lower the risk of heart disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and certain cancers.

1-avocado

Since avocados are a nutrient-dense source of MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acids), the fruit can be used to replace SFA (saturated fatty acids) in a diet to lower LDL-C (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) in the body.

Kale

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Kale has an excellent source of nutrients like zinc, folate, magnesium, calcium, vitamin C, fiber, and iron. Research has shown that dark leafy greens can reduce the risk of chronic illnesses like type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

Olive oil

Olive oil is a superfood that has been shown to provide a range of various health benefits. Extra virgin olive oil is associated with reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality on individuals that have a high cardiovascular risk.

olive-oils

Olive oil has a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid, which helps reduce inflammation in the body.

Sweet potato

Sweet potato is the superfood root vegetable that is full of nutrients that are beneficial to the body. They are an excellent source of carotenoids, fiber, potassium, vitamin C, and vitamin A.

sweet-potatoes_white-orange-purple

Consuming sweet potato is beneficial for the body due to reducing the risk of inflammation and DNA damage. Since it contains high levels of antioxidants, it may also prevent cell damage as well in the body.

Fermented Foods

FermentedFoodHeader

Fermented foods like yogurt, kefir sauerkraut, and many others are heavily sought after superfoods by consumers. This is because fermented foods have a range of fantastic health benefits like antioxidants, anti-microbial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, andante-diabetic properties.

Green tea

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Green tea is a lightly caffeinated beverage that has a broad spectrum of health benefits for the body. It is rich with antioxidants and polyphenolic compounds that can protect the body against chronic diseases and be a useful tool for bodyweight management.

Seaweed

seaweeds

Seaweed is packed with several nutrients like folate, vitamin K iodine, and fiber that is beneficial for the body. It plays an essential role by helping lowering blood pressure and to treat several chronic illnesses. Studies have shown that due to their potential beneficial activities such as anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic effects that are beneficial to prevent flare-ups in the white adipose tissue and systemic IR.

Conclusion

Superfoods are an essential additive boost to any healthy diet. These ten superfoods contain anti-inflammatory properties that are beneficial to the body to prevent the risk of inflammation in the body. Eating these foods combine with these products will provide relief from oxidative stress and inflammation that the body may encounter, as well as providing support to the endocrine system.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Basu, Arpita, et al. “Dietary Factors That Promote or Retard Inflammation.” Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16484595.

Dellwo, Adrienne. “The Potential Benefits of Omega-3 for Fibromyalgia & CFS.” Verywell Health, Verywell Health, 7 July 2019, www.verywellhealth.com/omega-3-for-fibromyalgia-and-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-715987.

Felman, Adam. “Fibromyalgia: Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 5 Jan. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/147083.php.

Jensen, Gitte S, et al. “Pain Reduction and Improvement in Range of Motion after Daily Consumption of an Açai (Euterpe Oleracea Mart.) Pulp-Fortified Polyphenolic-Rich Fruit and Berry Juice Blend.” Journal of Medicinal Food, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3133683/.

Oh, Ji-Hyun, et al. “Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Diabetic Effects of Brown Seaweeds in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.” Nutrition Research and Practice, The Korean Nutrition Society and the Korean Society of Community Nutrition, Feb. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4742310/.

Smriga, Miro, et al. “Lysine Fortification Reduces Anxiety and Lessens Stress in Family Members in Economically Weak Communities in Northwest Syria.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, National Academy of Sciences, 1 June 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15159538.

Tanaka, Takuji, et al. “Cancer Chemoprevention by Carotenoids.” Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 14 Mar. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22418926.

Unknown, Unknown. “What Are Superfoods? Top 10 Superfoods.” Fullscript, 4 Mar. 2019, fullscript.com/blog/superfoods.

Unni, Uma S, et al. “The Effect of a Controlled 8-Week Metabolic Ward Based Lysine Supplementation on Muscle Function, Insulin Sensitivity and Leucine Kinetics in Young Men.” Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22524975.

Wang, Li, et al. “Effect of a Moderate Fat Diet with and without Avocados on Lipoprotein Particle Number, Size and Subclasses in Overweight and Obese Adults: a Randomized, Controlled Trial.” Journal of the American Heart Association, Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 7 Jan. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25567051.

Wang, Ping-Yu, et al. “Higher Intake of Fruits, Vegetables or Their Fiber Reduces the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis.” Journal of Diabetes Investigation, John Wiley and Sons Inc., Jan. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26816602.

Watzl, Bernhard. “Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Plant-Based Foods and of Their Constituents.” International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research. Internationale Zeitschrift Fur Vitamin- Und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal International De Vitaminologie Et De Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19685439.

Şanlier, Nevin, et al. “Health Benefits of Fermented Foods.” Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28945458.

The 4Rs Protocol For a Healthy Gut

The 4Rs Protocol For a Healthy Gut

Do you feel:

  • Like you have been diagnosed with Celiac Disease, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Diverticulosis/Diverticulitis, or Leaky Gut Syndrome?
  • Excessive belching, burping, or bloating?
  • Abnormal distention after certain probiotics or natural supplements?
  • Suspicion of nutritional malabsorption?
  • Do digestive problems subside with relaxation?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might be experiencing gut problems and might have to try the 4R Protocol.

Food sensitivities, rheumatoid arthritis, and anxiety have one thing in common. These various conditions have all been associated with impaired gastrointestinal health. These conditions can happen from a poor diet to excess stress and many factors that can negatively impact the digestive function. It can potentially be the result of increased intestinal permeability, systemic inflammation, and the development of certain health conditions. The 4R protocol can be utilized to restore optimal digestive health and involves the four steps, which are: remove, replace, reinoculate, and repair.

Intestinal Permeability

The intestinal tract is the body’s primary physical barrier from the outside world. It protects the body from potentially harmful environmental factors that are passing through the digestive tract. It can be either toxin, pathogenic microorganisms, and other antigens that can harm the digestive tract causing problems. The intestinal lining is consisting of a single layer of epithelial cells that are separated by protein complexes known as tight junctions. In a healthy gut, the tight junction regulates the intestinal permeability by selectively allowing the transport of substances like water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the gut lumen, traveling across the intestinal barrier, while also preventing the absorption of harmful substances.

Certain environmental factors can damage the tight junction, and the result is that it can increase the intestinal permeability, which is referred to as intestinal hyperpermeability or leaky gut. Contributing factors to increased intestinal permeability include dietary excesses (saturated fats and alcohol), nutrient deficiencies (vitamin D and fiber), stress, and infections (Helicobacter pylori and bacterial infections.)

With an increased intestinal permeability, it can enable antigens to cross the gut mucosa into the systemic circulation. This is resulting in an immune response and a low-grade inflammation. Intestinal hyperpermeability has been associated with certain gastrointestinal conditions like IBS (irritable bowel syndrome), ulcerative colitis, and Crohn’s disease. It can also trigger certain autoimmune conditions like celiac disease, type 1 diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis, causing harm to the body.

What are the 4Rs?

The 4Rs is a four-step protocol that healthcare professionals advised individuals to use when they address digestive conditions and to support gut healing.

Step 1: Remove

Food allergies

The first step is to remove pathogens and other inflammatory triggers that are associated with increased intestinal permeability. Triggers like stress and chronic alcohol consumption can do much harm to an individual’s body. So targeting pathogens may involve treatment with pharmaceutical medication, antibiotics, or antimicrobial herbal supplements and removing inflammatory foods from the diet is advised, including:

  • Alcohol
  • Gluten
  • Food additives
  • Refined starches and sugar
  • Saturated and trans-fatty acids
  • Food sensitivities, which may be identified through the elimination diet

Step 2: Replace

The second step is to replace dietary nutrients that can help reduce inflammation and support digestive health. Anti-inflammatory food that is nutritious include:

  • High-fiber foods
  • Omega-3 fatty acids
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Mushrooms
  • Anti-inflammatory herbs and spices

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Certain dietary supplements can also be used to support the digestive function by assisting in the digestion and absorption of dietary nutrients. The digestive enzymes assist in the breakdown of fats, proteins, and carbohydrates, while also benefiting individuals with an impaired digestive function, food intolerances, or having celiac disease. Supplements like bile acid supplements can also assist in nutrient absorption by emulsifying lipids. Studies have stated that bile acids have been used to treat the conditions of the liver, gallbladder, and bile duct. Bile acids have been shown to prevent gallstone formation following bariatric surgery.

Step 3: Reinoculate

The third step is to reinoculate the gut microbiota with beneficial bacteria. Studies have been shown that probiotic supplementation has been used to improve the composition of the gut microbiota by restoring the beneficial Bifidobacterium and the Lactobacillus bacteria species. With probiotic supplements, they can help improve the gut by enhancing the secretion of anti-inflammatory substances, supporting the immune system, altering the microbial composition, and reducing the intestinal permeability.

fermented-veggies_1535647626

Probiotics are found in fermented foods like yogurt, fermented vegetables, fermented soy products, and kombucha. Foods that have probiotics in them are considered as transient as they do not persist in the gastrointestinal tract. Surprisingly, they may still have an impact on human health by producing vitamins and anti-microbial compounds by influencing the gut microbiota diversity and function.

Step 4: Repair

cooking-with-herbs

The last step is to repair the gut. This step involves repairing the intestinal lining with specific nutrients and medicinal herbs. These herbs and supplements have been shown to decrease intestinal permeability and inflammation. Some of these herbs and supplements include:

  • Aloe vera
  • Chios mastic gum
  • DGL (Deglycyrrhizinated licorice)
  • Marshmallow root
  • L-glutamine
  • Omega-3 fatty acids
  • Polyphenols
  • Vitamin D
  • Zinc

Conclusion

Since many dietary and lifestyle factors can adversely affect the digestive system and can be the contributor to several health conditions. The main goal of the 4Rs protocol is to minimize the factors that can lead the gut to have an increased intestinal permeability and inflammation, as well as introducing the beneficial factors that can promote gut health and healing. Some products are here to help support the gastrointestinal system by supporting the intestines, improving the sugar metabolism, and targeting the amino acids that are intended to support the intestines.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal, and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

De Santis, Stefania, et al. “Nutritional Keys for Intestinal Barrier Modulation.” Frontiers in Immunology, Frontiers Media S.A., 7 Dec. 2015, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4670985/.

Ianiro, Gianluca, et al. “Digestive Enzyme Supplementation in Gastrointestinal Diseases.” Current Drug Metabolism, Bentham Science Publishers, 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4923703/.

Mu, Qinghui, et al. “Leaky Gut As a Danger Signal for Autoimmune Diseases.” Frontiers, Frontiers, 5 May 2017, www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fimmu.2017.00598/full.

Rezac, Shannon, et al. “Fermented Foods as a Dietary Source of Live Organisms.” Frontiers in Microbiology, Frontiers Media S.A., 24 Aug. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6117398/.

Sander, Guy R., et al. “Rapid Disruption of Intestinal Barrier Function by Gliadin Involves Altered Expression of Apical Junctional Proteins.” FEBS Press, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 8 Aug. 2005, febs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1016/j.febslet.2005.07.066.

Sartor, R Balfour. “Therapeutic Manipulation of the Enteric Microflora in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Antibiotics, Probiotics, and Prebiotics.” Gastroenterology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15168372.

Zaremba, Karolina. “The 4Rs: How To Heal The Gut Naturally.” Fullscript, 24 Sept. 2019, fullscript.com/blog/natural-gut-healing.

Health Coaching in El Paso: Part 1

Health Coaching in El Paso: Part 1

Let’s be honest, making a change to your lifestyle is hard. Whether that is due to lack of time, motivation, or not knowing where to begin, there is one thing that makes it easier: accountability. This is where health coaching comes into play. Going through the process with someone and having another individual to talk about it with,  makes the change seem more achievable. The bottom line is that people need support. When it comes to changing one’s lifestyle and adapting new healthy behaviors, individuals who have support are more successful.

 

What Is A Health Coach? 

 

A health coach can be defined by The Institute for Integrative Nutrition as, ” a wellness authority and supportive mentor who motivates individuals to cultivate positive health choices. Health coaches educate and support clients to achieve their health goals through lifestyle and behavior adjustments.”

Health coaches are becoming more and more essential as modern medicine continues to improve. Now more than ever, the medical field is advancing at high rate speeds and practitioners do not always have the available time some patients need. Here is where health coaches come into play. Essentially, the position of a health coach was created to fill the void in many doctor offices.  Many doctors contribute but do not have the time or resources to help each patient build healthy habits on a day to day basis. However, health coaches are available to be a supportive mentor who help and guide patients in making healthy lifestyle changes.

 

 

 

What Does A Health Coach Do? 

Health coaches play a vital role in modern medicine. Health coaches can work in multiple settings including for a doctor, a spa, a gym, wellness centers, or even have their own private practice. Health coaches help individuals make lasting changes and keep patients on track to feel their best. In addition to this, health coaches motivate, push, encourage, and create plans with patients to optimize energy and decrease stress and fatigue.

Health coaches are not just for diet and exercise help, but for other aspects of life as well. Health coaches are able to help with stress, sleep, relationships, habits, and even one’s career.

Related image

 

Health coaches work with individuals to go through the problem areas in their life and give them tools to improve their lifestyles. By working with a health coach, the individual begins to learn and create habits that will affect and improve their lives while also giving them the essential life skills they can use for a lifetime.  One of the main things that coaches do is aid patients in setting goals. For many, goals are set but are not attainable, healthy, nor realistic. Health coaches work to break down these goals with patients into smaller, more reachable goals. This helps patients push themselves and not get discouraged because they are hitting these smaller marks along the way.

Aside from setting goals, health coaches also prepare the patient for the emotional fallout that can occur. As mentioned earlier, lifestyle changes are not easy and do not occur overnight. This being said, it is normal to have negative emotions regarding the subject along the way. Health coaches are prepared for this and will help you to not only work through them but learn to adapt to these situations and how to overcome the barriers.

 

How Can You Benefit? 

 

In the United States, over half of the adult population is affected by at least one chronic disease, many having to do with joint inflammation (Pecoraro, 2019).  Integrative health coaching allows patients to visualize their goals and work with their health coach to properly identify their values and create action steps to achieve optimal health and wellbeing.

People can utilize health coaches at any moment in time. However, many people choose to have a health coach help them after they receive a diagnosis or are overall unhappy in their health and lifestyle choices.

Health coaches are respectful of the personal knowledge one has of their own life and body. Thus, letting the patient have a say in their plan and protocol. This is beneficial because if a patient is included in the creation of their health plan, they are more likely to comply and make it attainable. Not only does this build trust in the professional relationship, but it allows a health coach to consider all areas in the patient’s life.

Individuals can benefit by learning to lessen health issues, problem solve, and gain a new perspective on their life.

A health coach can do a lot more than just aid in diet and exercise. As one can see, health coaches are helpful in many different aspects of one’s life. The qualifications for a health coach can vary. Personally, I have a bachelors degree in Exercise Science with an emphasis in Health Education from Grand Canyon University. In addition to this, I gained my Exercise Physiologist Certification through the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). With this background, I am knowledgeable in the pillars of health and how to successfully guide an individual. Almost every person can benefit from a health coach in at least one way. – Kenna Vaughn, Senior Health Coach

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900.
More Fiber Equals Less Inflammation

More Fiber Equals Less Inflammation

Do you feel:

  • Inflammation in your joints?
  • Unpredictable abdominal swelling?
  • Frequent bloating and distention after eating?
  • Unpredictable food reactions?
  • Aches, pains, and swelling throughout the body?

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you might be experiencing a low intake of fiber in your diet, causing inflammation.

Throughout several decades, Americans have lost much diversity in their diets, impacting their gut microbiome, and the contribution to the autoimmune disorder epidemic. The vast majority of people have a less than perfect diet that is consists of high in calories, short on nutrients, and low on fiber intake. Research has stated that about only 10 percent of Americans have met their daily fiber requirements.

The diet is a significant environmental trigger in autoimmune diseases. Dietary approaches can provide the most effective means of an individual to returning balance and the dysfunction with the gastrointestinal system. Researchers have found out that the role of dietary fibers can help with rheumatoid arthritis as there is new and developing research on this discovery.

What is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis is a long term, progressive, and disabling autoimmune disease. It causes inflammation, swelling, and pain in and around the joints and organs of the body. It affects up to 1 percent of the world’s population and over 1.3 million people in America, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Support Network.

inflammed joints

Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, which means that it affects the whole body, not just the joints. It occurs when an individual’s immune system mistakes their body’s healthy tissues for foreign invaders. As the immune system responds to this, inflammation occurs in the target tissue or organ. Symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis can include:

  • Pain, swelling, and stiffness in more than one joint
  • Symmetrical joint involvement
  • Joint deformity
  • Unsteadiness when walking
  • Fever
  • A general feeling of being unwell
  • Loss of function and mobility
  • Weight loss
  • Weakness

Fiber and Inflammation

Individuals who eat healthily knows that eating fibers in their diet can help reduce the risk of developing various conditions. The AHAEP (American Heart Association Eating Plan) has stated that people should be eating a variety of food fiber sources in their diet. The total dietary fiber intake that a person should be eating is 25 to 30 grams a day from foods, not supplements. Currently, adults in the United States eat about 15 grams a day on their fiber, which is half of the recommended amount.

Eating a high fiber diet can provide many rewards to the body. Eating fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts, and whole grains can provide a boost of vitamins, minerals, protein, and healthy nutrients in the body. Studies have been shown that eating a high fiber diet can help lower the markers of inflammation, which is a critical factor in many forms of arthritis.

Grain bread with different vegetable . Concept of healthy food

The body needs two types of fibers, which are soluble and insoluble. Soluble fibers are mixed with water to form a gel-like consistency, which slows digestion and helps the body absorb nutrients better and helps lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. Insoluble fibers help the digestive system run more efficiently as it adds bulk to stool, which can help prevent constipation.

There have been a few studies that found that people who eat high fiber diets have lower CRP (C-reactive protein) levels in their blood. CRP is a marker for inflammation and is linked to rheumatoid arthritis. When a person eats a high fiber diet, it not only reduces inflammation to their bodies, but it helps lower the body weight as well. High fiber-rich foods feed the beneficial bacteria living in the gut, and then it is releasing substances to the body, promoting lower levels of inflammation.

A study has been shown that patients with rheumatoid arthritis that they consumed either a high fiber bar or cereal for 28 days while continuing with their current medication had decreased levels of inflammation. Researchers noticed that they had an increase of T regulatory cell numbers, a positive Th1/Th17 ratio, a decrease in bone erosion, and a healthy gut microbiome.

Gut Health and Inflammation

gut health

The gut plays a crucial role in the immune function as well as digesting and absorbing food in the body. The intestinal barrier provides an effective protective barrier from pathogenic bacteria but also being a healthy environment for beneficial bacteria. With a high fiber diet, it can lead to the production of SCFAs (short-chain fatty acids) in the gastrointestinal tract, thus playing an essential role in T regulatory cell activation, which regulates the intestinal immune system. When inflammation comes to play in the gut, it can disrupt the intestinal permeability barrier and cause a disruption, leading to leaky gut. Probiotics and a high fiber diet can help prevent inflammation and provide a healthy gut function.

Conclusion

Eating a high fiber diet is essential to prevent inflammation, not on the joints, but everywhere in the body. Even though individuals eat half of the recommended amount of fiber in their diets, due to their hectic lifestyle, eating a high fiber diet is beneficial. Incorporating fiber in their diet gradually is ideal as well as drinking water with the fibers to make the process work more effectively in the body. Some products can help aid the body by supporting not only the gastrointestinal function and muscular system but making sure that the skin, hair, nail, and joints are healthy as well.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s declaration on our website to get full details on this historic moment.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

at UCSF Medical Center, Healthcare Specialist. “Increasing Fiber Intake.” UCSF Medical Center, 2018, www.ucsfhealth.org/education/increasing_fiber_intake/.

Brazier, Yvette. “Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Symptoms, Causes, and Complications.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 16 Oct. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323361.php.

Hakansson, Asa, and Goran Molin. “Gut Microbiota and Inflammation.” Nutrients, MDPI, June 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257638/.

Jurgelewicz, Michael. “New Study Demonstrates the Role of Fiber in Rheumatoid Arthritis.” Designs for Health, 11 Oct. 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1125.

Unknown, Unknown. “More Fiber, Less Inflammation?” Www.arthritis.org, 25 June, 2015, www.arthritis.org/living-with-arthritis/arthritis-diet/anti-inflammatory/fiber-inflammation.php.

6 Foods to Boost the Immune System

6 Foods to Boost the Immune System

Do you feel:

  • Feel hungry an hour or two after eating
  • Digestive problems subside with rest
  • Excessive belching, burping or bloating
  • Stomach pain, burning or aching 1-4 hours after eating
  • Sense of fullness during and after meals

If you are experiencing any of the situations, then you might want to try these six types of food to help boost your immune system.

The Immune System

The immune system is the body’s defense mechanism that provides a robust anatomical barrier.  The gastrointestinal tract is one of the barriers. It has many defense mechanisms such as peristalsis, gastric acid, bile acids, digestive enzymes, flushing, thiocyanate, defensins, and gut flora in the body. The gut flora is the critical focus for many health professionals; however, all the essential defense mechanisms rely heavily on the gastrointestinal tract to function efficiently.

There are ways to benefit the immune system as one of the ways is to plan meals that are filled with necessary nutrients that can fight off infections. Prebiotic and probiotic-rich foods help enhance microbial diversity in the gut, while vitamin C-rich foods can mop up the free radicals that have entered the body. Another benefit is to avoid foods that promote infections like heavily processed foods, added sugars, and sodas. When it is not consumed in the body, it can help boost immunity and enrich the gut microbiome. Here are the six foods to help boost the immune system in the body.

Yellow Bell Peppers

Red, yellow, and green bell peppers (capsicum) background

Due to being the most natural vegetable to find at a local grocery store or farmer’s markets around the world, yellow bell peppers contain more vitamin C than oranges. Since oranges contain about 78% of vitamin C, yellow bell peppers contain about 152% of vitamin C and numerous vitamins and minerals. Bell peppers (yellow, red, orange and green) contain the following:

  • Vitamin B6: Bell peppers contain pyridoxine, which is an essential nutrient for the formation of red blood cells.
  • Vitamin K1: This vitamin is also known as phylloquinone, which is vital for bone health and blood clotting.
  • Potassium: This mineral is essential for improving heart health.
  • Folate: Also known as vitamin B9, this vitamin has a variety of functions to the body and is highly essential to take during pregnancy.
  • Vitamin E: This is a powerful antioxidant that is essential for healthy nerves and muscles.
  • Vitamin A: Red bell peppers are high in beta carotene when consumed converts to vitamin A in the body.

Vitamin C helps boost the immune system by influencing the development and function of lymphocytes, and with about half a cup of yellow bell peppers will give the body those lymphocytes.

Guava

Guava is a traditional remedy for a range of health conditions that a person may encounter. These tropical fruits are seasonal throughout the winter. They contain about 140% of vitamin C and rich with lycopene, which is excellent for the immune system as it plays an essential role in the activities of the enzymes. Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that has been implicated in having a potentially beneficial impact on several chronic diseases, including cancer.

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Studies have been shown that the guava fruit and the leaves have been known to have a positive effect on a range of illnesses and symptoms, including:

  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Menstrual cramps
  • Diarrhea
  • Flu
  • Blood pressure
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Cancer

Broccoli

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Broccoli is high in phytonutrients like vitamins A, C, and E while also containing sulforaphane. Sulforaphane is activated when broccoli or any cruciferous vegetables are chewed, cut, or damaged. Raw broccoli or broccoli sprouts contain the highest level of sulforaphane when it is not boiled or cooked. Studies have been shown that consuming broccoli has been associated with reducing many lifestyle-related health conditions like:

  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • Improves digestion
  • Regulate the immune system
  • Helps support healthy-looking skin
  • Decrease inflammation
  • Lowers blood pressure

Turmeric

Turmeric is an excellent immune-boosting food since it supports healthy inflammatory pathways in the body. Inflammation in the body is implicated in the pathophysiology of many health-compromising situations that can lead to chronic illnesses. So consuming pro healthy inflammation foods like turmeric or incorporating turmeric in dishes is an ideal way to boost the immune system.

turmeric

The active component in turmeric is curcumin and has potent biological properties like anti-oxidative, anti-cytotoxic, and neurorestorative properties, making it an essential staple in an immune-boosting food. Here are some of the benefits that turmeric provides to the body:

  • Anti-inflammatory properties
  • Pain relief on the joints
  • Improves liver function
  • Reducing the risk of cancer
  • Preventing gut inflammation

Green Tea

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Green tea helps the body relax and contains L-theanine that helps the formation of healthy T-cells. Green tea also contains EGCG (epigallocatechin gallate) and is packed filled with flavonoids to help boost the body’s immune system. Here are some of the health benefits that green tea provides:

  • Cancer prevention
  • Lowers the risk of cardiovascular diseases
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Decrease the risk of a stroke
  • Lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes
  • Help lose weight
  • Helps lowers inflammation on the skin
  • Improves brain function
  • Helps reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease

Almonds

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Almonds are packed filled with vitamins, minerals, protein, and fibers. It contains vitamin E and helps boost the immune system since it is a free radical scavenging antioxidant. They are easy to find in any grocery store, and the health benefits that almonds can provide are:

  • Lowering cholesterol
  • Reduce the risk of cancer
  • Provide heart health benefits
  • Reduce type 2 diabetes
  • Manage weight

Conclusion

Eating these six foods can be beneficial to support a healthy immune system. They are bursting with plant-based nutrition that the body needs to make sure that chronic illnesses like inflammation in the gut. Some products help support the immune system as well as making sure that the gastrointestinal system and the sugar metabolism is supported. Eating a variety of foods that has antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties is beneficial to the body. With the cold and flu season approaching, it is highly relevant to consume these foods to help fight against the cold and flu and providing assistance to the immune system.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s declaration on our website to get full details on this historic moment.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


Reference:

Ahmed, Touqeer, et al. “Curcuminoids Rescue Long-Term Potentiation Impaired by Amyloid Peptide in Rat Hippocampal Slices. – Semantic Scholar.” Undefined, 1 Jan. 1970, www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Curcuminoids-rescue-long-term-potentiation-impaired-Ahmed-Gilani/c66297f8d0f3b633fac263cbb81f82de1893387a.

Arnarson, Atli. “Bell Peppers 101: Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits.” Healthline, 27 Mar. 2019, www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/bell-peppers.

Burgess, Lana. “Health Benefits of Guava: How to Use It, Nutrition, and Risks.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 20 Mar. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324758.php.

Du, Guang-Jian, et al. “Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG) Is the Most Effective Cancer Chemopreventive Polyphenol in Green Tea.” Nutrients, MDPI, 8 Nov. 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3509513/.

Kim, DS, et al. “Curcuminoids from Curcuma Longa L. (Zingiberaceae) That Protect PC12 Rat Pheochromocytoma and Normal Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells from BetaA(1-42) Insult.” Neuroscience Letters, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 27 Apr. 2001, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11297823.

Luo, Cong, and Xian-Guo Wu. “Lycopene Enhances Antioxidant Enzyme Activities and Immunity Function in N-Methyl-N’-Nitro-N-Nitrosoguanidine-Enduced Gastric Cancer Rats.” International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Molecular Diversity Preservation International (MDPI), 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3116194/.

Menon, Venugopal P, and Adluri Ram Sudheer. “Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Curcumin.” Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2007, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17569207.

Nordqvist, Joseph. “Almonds: Health Benefits, Nutrition, and Risks.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 14 Dec. 2017, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/269468.php.

Team, Biotics Education. “Key Foods to Boost the Immune System.” Biotics Research Blog, 15 Oct. 2019, blog.bioticsresearch.com/key-foods-to-boost-the-immune-system.

van Gorkom, Gwendolyn N Y, et al. “Influence of Vitamin C on Lymphocytes: An Overview.” Antioxidants (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 10 Mar. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29534432.

Vermeulen, Martijn, et al. “Bioavailability and Kinetics of Sulforaphane in Humans after Consumption of Cooked versus Raw Broccoli.” Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 26 Nov. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18950181.

Ware, Megan. “Broccoli: Health Benefits, Nutritional Information.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 8 Dec. 2017, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266765.php.

Ware, Megan. “Green Tea: Health Benefits, Side Effects, and Research.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 28 Mar. 2017, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/269538.php.

Ware, Megan. “Turmeric: Benefits and Nutrition.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 24 May 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/306981.php.

Micronutrients For the GI Tract

Micronutrients For the GI Tract

Do you feel:

  • Excessive belching, burping or bloating
  • Gas immediately following a meal
  • Stomach pain, burning or aching 1-4 hours after eating
  • Feel hungry an hour or two after eating
  • Digestive problems when lying down or bending forward

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then you should try some micronutrients for your GI tract health.

GI Tract Health

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Over two thousand years ago, Hippocrates recognized that the gut plays a significant role in overall health and that modern scientific research has substantiated and solidified this view. With GI (gastrointestinal) health, advanced testing, and intricate healing protocols focused a lot when it comes to the GI tract. Some patients may benefit from the precise analysis of the makeup from their gut flora or the specific food elimination and reintroduction strategies, but not to overlook the fundamentals. Addressing the basics like general micronutrient repletion or supplementation with the foundational nutrients can be targeted for therapeutic purposes and can go a long way for an individual’s healing.

The Micronutrients

These are some of the fundamental micronutrients that the body needs to perform the everyday task. These can mostly be found in foods or in supplements and vitamins that are consumed, and even though high restriction diets can deplete these nutrients, they are still crucial for not only our gut health but for the entire body system as well.

Glutamine

The amino acid glutamine is a trusty workhorse for a healthy gut function in the body. Even though it is technically not an essential amino acid, it serves as an energy source for epithelial cells that makes up the intestinal lining for the intestines. Various circumstances like trauma, burns, or recovery from significant operations or illnesses can increase the body’s demand for glutamine.

Glutamine can be found in all protein foods like:

  • Eggs
  • Beef
  • Skim milk
  • Tofu
  • White rice
  • Corn

Taurine

Another amino acid is taurine is beneficial for individuals who need help with the digestion of dietary fats. Taurine is unique due to not being used in any structural protein; however, it has other roles in the body. Taurine can be synthesized from cysteine and can be obtained from animal foods specifically, sadly though it is nonexistent in plant food. Bile acids that are bound with taurine are secreted by the liver; the making of this compound is critical for bile acid function and proper fat absorption in the body.

Taurine can provide these health benefits to the body, which includes:

  • Improve blood sugar control and fight diabetes
  • Stop the occurrence of epilepsy
  • Reduces seizure attacks
  • Prevents cardiovascular diseases
  • Regulates muscle contractions
  • Controls and calms the central nervous system

Potassium

Potassium is the core nutrient that plays a role in a healthy GI function, especially when it comes to intestinal motility. Some disorders like fatigue and cardiac arrhythmias can be the result of potassium deficiency, and inadequate potassium may lead to delayed gastric emptying and intestinal paralysis. If the body is not treated soon, it can lead to chronic illnesses in the GI, causing unpleasant effects like bloating, abdominal pain, and constipation.

All food supplies have an abundance of potassium, but certain medications can reduce potassium levels. Factors like excessive alcohol consumption or strict chronic dieting for weight loss can be the result of inadequate potassium intake and the body status of a person.

Some of the health benefits that potassium can provide are:

  • Maintains constant blood pressure
  • Reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases
  • Maintains bone density
  • Maintains muscle mass

Vitamin B6

B vitamins, especially vitamin B6, are highly essential to the GI tract because they make sure that the brain is also healthy as well. Deficiency of vitamin B6 can cause these symptoms:

  • Tingling, numbness, and pain in the hands and feet
  • Anemia
  • Seizures
  • Depression
  • Confusion
  • Weak immune system

Vitamin B6 is a water-soluble vitamin that produces the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine and forming myelin for the body. This vitamin can help boost brain function and can improve memory function. Some of the other benefits it can provide to the body are:

  • Lowers the risk of dementia
  • Reduce the severity of nausea during pregnancy
  • Protection from air pollution
  • Ensures the normal functioning of digestive enzymes

Conclusion

Even though these are the necessary foundational micronutrients and amino acids for their roles in the GI tract, it is crucial for individuals who have these micronutrient deficiencies. Even though the popularity of highly restrictive diets emphasizes on caloric restrictions for weight loss for individuals, it can limit the intake of certain nutrient-dense foods. It can cause disruptions to the gastrointestinal tract. When a person surrounds themselves with an abundance of foods with these micronutrients can live a healthy life. Some products combined with these micronutrient foods can provide support to the gastrointestinal system and help boost the sugar metabolism for the body.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s declaration on our website to get full details on this historic moment.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Brazier, Yvette. “Vitamin B-6: Benefits, Dosage, Food Sources, and Deficiency Symptoms.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 27 Mar. 2017, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/219662.php.

Cadman, Bethany. “L-Glutamine for IBS: Benefits, Side Effects, and Research.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 7 Feb. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/320850.php.

Caporuscio, Jessica. “What Is Taurine? Benefits and Side Effects.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 26 Sept. 2019, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326476.php.

Higdon, Jane. “Potassium.” Linus Pauling Institute, 14 Oct. 2019, lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/potassium#deficiency.

Mawer, Rudy. “What Is Taurine? Benefits, Side Effects, and More.” Healthline, 27 Nov. 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/what-is-taurine.

Megan Ware, RDN. “Potassium: Health Benefits and Recommended Intake.” Medical News Today, MediLexicon International, 10 Jan. 2018, www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/287212.php.

Team, DFH. “Micronutrients in GI Health.” Designs for Health, 11 Oct. 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1123.

Tinsley, Grant. “Glutamine: Benefits, Uses, and Side Effects.” Healthline, 13 Jan. 2018, www.healthline.com/nutrition/glutamine.

Filling the Fridge With Flavonoids

Filling the Fridge With Flavonoids

Do you feel:

  • Crave sweets during the day
  • Eating sweets does not relieve the sugar craving
  • Waist girth is equal or larger than hip girth
  • Difficulty losing weight
  • Feel shaky, jittery or have tremors

If you are experiencing any of these situations, then try eating flavonoid filled foods to regulate your metabolic health.

Flavonoids

Going to the grocery store is an excellent way to restock on certain food items and getting food that is filled with flavonoids. Nearly all fruits and vegetables are filled with this chemical component and are proven to be beneficial to the body. Flavonoids are a class of plant-derived polyphenolic compounds that represents a larger class of phytochemicals and phytonutrients. They are responsible for protecting plants from threats like insects and animals, while also having many beneficial health effects on metabolic disorders in humans.

With their chemical structure, they are group into six primary subclasses: anthocyanins, flavanols, flavan-3-ols, flavanones, flavones, and isoflavones. They concentrated more on the skins and seeds of plants, and when they are consumed into the body, they have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Heart Disease and Cancer

Flavonoid-rich foods have been linked to many health benefits and have been known to protect the body against heart disease and cancer. A recent study stated that individuals who consume a moderate to the high amount of flavonoid-rich foods have the lowest risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and cancer mortality. Individuals who are heavy alcohol users and cigarette smokers have a higher risk of developing these chronic illnesses.

Flavonoid Beneficial Effects on Metabolic Health

Studies provided evidence that flavonoids from citrus fruits possess serval biological activities and have emerged as efficient therapeutics for the treatment of CVD (cardiovascular disease). Citrus flavonoids can scavenge free radicals, improve glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, modulate lipid metabolism, and adipocyte differentiation, suppress inflammation and apoptosis, and improve endothelial dysfunction.

A journal review demonstrated how natural-occurring flavonoids could prevent diabetes and its many complications. Flavonoids can target specific molecules that are involved in regulating pathways that support beta-cell proliferation, insulin signaling and secretion, reducing apoptosis, regulating glucose metabolism in the liver, improving carbohydrate digestion, glucose uptake, and deposition in the body. In human nutrition, quercetin (the most abundant dietary flavonoid) was shown to stimulate GLUT4 translocation to the molecular signaling that sets the motion during muscle contractions in the body.

Another study summarized that the role of flavonoid in metabolic diseases was able to elevate the energy system by activating the sympathetic nervous system, increasing epinephrine and thyroid hormone release, stimulating thermogenesis, and induce browning of  WAT (white adipose tissue). Browning WAT and up-regulating BAT (brown adipose tissue) can help increase the energy expenditure and improves lipids and glucose metabolism. When this happens, flavonoids stimulate the AMPK-PGC-1𝛼, Sirt1, and PPAR𝛼 signaling pathways. These critical pathways are involved in preventing obesity and metabolic derangement due to their role in energy metabolism in the body.

Flavonoids Prevent Neuroinflammation

Blueberries are an excellent source of flavonoids that may help brain function in older adults. They have protective effects against the development of neurocognitive disorders like Alzheimer’s and other dementia diseases. Studies have shown that anthocyanins have the responsibility for improving cognitive function and working memories on the individual’s brain.

Studies have been shown that flavonoids target astrocytes, and these are star-shaped glial cells of the CNS (central nervous system). When they are healthy, they are crucial for functional control of the CNS since they are the primary cells that are responsible for neurotropic growth, synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis, cell migration, and differentiation. When glial cells are overactivated and dysfunctional, they are associated with the pathogenesis of brain diseases and cancers, hence why flavonoid therapy is a safe treatment of brain pathologies.

Sources of Flavonoids

Flavonoids are easily attainable through eating plant-based foods and beverages. Fruits, vegetables, tea, dark chocolate, and red wine are great examples because they are filled with not only flavonoids, but they also contain anti-inflammatory and antioxidants properties. The phrase “eat the rainbow” takes a whole new meaning for anyone who is trying to eat healthier. Colorful foods with deep reds, purples, oranges, yellows, greens, blues, and black hues are filled with flavonoids. Health professionals often recommend that it is best to avoid white foods that lack nutrients like refined bread, pasta, and sugars. However, white/tan-colored foods like garlic, cauliflower, mushrooms, ginger, onions, and parsnips offer oxidant-fighting properties that are perfect for getting rid of free radicals in the body.

Conclusion

Flavonoids are a class of plant-derived polyphenolic compounds that is in a variety of fruits and vegetables that are easily attainable for anyone to eat. When it is consumed into the body, it has many beneficial health effects on the body. They contained anti-inflammatory and antioxidants that the body needs to fight off free radicals that may have entered the body through environmental factors. Some products can be paired with flavonoid foods that can offer metabolic support as well as supporting the body’s sugar metabolism. So go out and eat the flavonoid food rainbow.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s proclamation on our website to get full details on this historic moment.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Aron, Patricia M, and James A Kennedy. “Flavan-3-Ols: Nature, Occurrence, and Biological Activity.” Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18081206.

Barreca, Davide, et al. “Flavanones: Citrus Phytochemical with Health-Promoting Properties.” BioFactors (Oxford, England), U.S. National Library of Medicine, 8 July 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28497905.

Bondonno, Nicola P, et al. “Flavonoid Intake Is Associated with Lower Mortality in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health Cohort.” Nature Communications, Nature Publishing Group UK, 13 Aug. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6692395/.

Cannon, Barbara, and Jan Nedergaard. “Brown Adipose Tissue: Function and Physiological Significance.” Physiological Reviews, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14715917.

Erdman, John W, et al. “Effects of Cocoa Flavanols on Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease.” Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18296357.

Lila, Mary Ann. “Anthocyanins and Human Health: An In Vitro Investigative Approach.” Journal of Biomedicine & Biotechnology, Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1082894/.

Mahmoud, Ayman M, et al. “Beneficial Effects of Citrus Flavonoids on Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health.” Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, Hindawi, 10 Mar. 2019, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6431442/.

Matias, Isadora, et al. “Functions of Flavonoids in the Central Nervous System: Astrocytes as Targets for Natural Compounds.” Neurochemistry International, Pergamon, 2 Feb. 2016, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0197018616300092?via%3Dihub.

Panche, A N, et al. “Flavonoids: an Overview.” Journal of Nutritional Science, Cambridge University Press, 29 Dec. 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5465813/.

Richter, Erik A, and Mark Hargreaves. “Exercise, GLUT4, and Skeletal Muscle Glucose Uptake.” Physiological Reviews, U.S. National Library of Medicine, July 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23899560.

Team, DFH. “Stock Your Fridge with Flavonoids.” Designs for Health, 1 Oct. 2019, blog.designsforhealth.com/node/1116.

Trayhurn, P, and J H Beattie. “Physiological Role of Adipose Tissue: White Adipose Tissue as an Endocrine and Secretory Organ.” The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2001, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11681807.

Yu, Jie, et al. “Isoflavones: Anti-Inflammatory Benefit and Possible Caveats.” Nutrients, MDPI, 10 June 2016, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4924202/.

 

 

 

 

Functional Endocrinology: Essential Fatty Acids in Hormones

Functional Endocrinology: Essential Fatty Acids in Hormones

All fats, including saturated fatty acids, have very important roles in the body. The most important fats are the ones that the body can’t make and must be coming from the foods that a person eats.  Essential fatty acids are lipids that are involved in various biological processes and produce many compounds when they are metabolized in the body. The two primary EFAs (essential fatty acids) are linoleic acid (Omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (Omega-3). These two omegas are essential for the body since they are consumed from dietary sources because the body does not have the ability to synthesize them and EFAs are synthesized into prostaglandins, which are necessary for proper hormone signaling in the body.

Omega-6

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Omega-6 fatty acids or linoleic acid are polyunsaturated fatty acids that are primarily used for energy and can be converted into longer omega-6 fats called ARA (arachidonic acid). ARA are used to produce eicosanoids, but they are prone to be more pro-inflammatory. Studies have shown that pro-inflammatory eicosanoids are important chemicals in the immune systems, however, when there are too many to produce, they can increase inflammation and inflammatory diseases in the body.

Researchers state that even though omega-6 fats are essential for a healthy body, the modern Western diet is making individuals consume more omega-6 fatty acids than the recommended amount. In a regular healthy diet, the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3s is 4:1 or less. In a Western diet however, the ratio is between 10:1 and 50:1.

Even though, an individual should consume the recommended amount of omega-6 fatty acids, research has shown that omega-6 fatty acids can lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases and treat symptoms that cause chronic diseases. In certain oils that contains omega-6 fatty acids, GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), which is an anti-inflammatory component and when consumed it converts to DGLA (dihomo-gamma-linolenic acids), which has anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative properties against cancer.

A study has shown that when an individual takes a high dose of GLA in their diet, it can significantly reduce a number of symptoms caused by rheumatoid arthritis, and another study found that taking GLA supplements with a breast cancer drug is more effective in lowering breast cancer.

Omega-3

omega3-foods

Just like omega-6 fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids are polyunsaturated fats that play important roles in providing a number of health benefits for a functional body. Omega-3 fatty acids contain three important compounds that are found in foods, they are ALA (alpha-linolenic acid); which converts into energy for the body, DHA (docosahexaenoic acid); which is the key component for a functional brain and retina, and lastly, EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid); which has cardiovascular benefits including lowering serum triglyceride and non-HDL-C (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) in the body.

When it comes to those three important components in omega-3s, ALA is mainly found in plants, while DHA and EPA are found in mostly animal products and algae. What makes these three components work well in the omega-3 supplements is that they are a crucial part of the human cell membrane and improve heart health, support mental health, decrease liver fats and fight inflammation.

With omega-3 fatty acids, lots of people don’t consume it as much as omega-6, due to not eating a lot of fatty fish as often and consuming omega-6 through fried food being cooked in refined vegetable oils. To balance a healthy diet, individuals can take an omega-3 supplement to balance out the omega-6 consumption to make sure the body is receiving these fatty health benefits.

Prostaglandins

Prostaglandins are a component of this regulatory system, they affect multiple hormone synthesis and secretion pathways in the hypothalamus-pituitary axis. They are a group of endogenously occurring acidic lipids that appear to play a role in the reproductive physiology.

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Since prostaglandins are bioactive lipids, they exert an autocrine or paracrine function by binding to specific GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) to activate intracellular signaling and gene transcription. As key regulators of reproductive processes, prostaglandins has many functions like having a role in the hypothalamic and pituitary control of gonadotropin secretion, ovulation, in luteinization and in the corpus luteum regression.

Prostaglandins also play a key role in the inflammatory response in the body. Their biosynthesis is significantly increased in inflamed tissues and can contribute to the development of the cardinal signs of acute inflammation in the body.

Researchers stated that prostaglandins have a plethora of actions in the central nervous system that can affect the progress of inflammation in the body differently, however, further studies are being tested to inhibit the role of these lipid mediators.

Conclusion

All fats play a very important role in the body. Essential fatty acids produce many compounds in the body when they are being metabolized in the body. Since the body can not produce essential fatty acids, they have to be consumed through food. The two important essential fatty acids are omega-6 and omega-3. These two fatty supplements help the body gain the nutrients the body needs to synthesize. Prostaglandins are also a key role in the body since they affect the pathways in the hypothalamus-pituitary axis and plays the role of regulating the reproductive physiology. Some products are formulated to target the immune support by creating micronized structure to increase the surface-to-volume ratio of particles to be more available to enzymatic actions.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s proclamation on our website to get full details on this declaration.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

Bardin, T P. “The Role of Prostaglandins in Reproductive Physiology.” The Ohio State Medical Journal, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 1970, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/4918753.

Behrman, H R. “Prostaglandins in Hypothalamo-Pituitary and Ovarian Function.” Annual Review of Physiology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1979, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/373605.

Brinton, Eliot A, and R Preston Mason. “Prescription Omega-3 Fatty Acid Products Containing Highly Purified Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA).” Lipids in Health and Disease, BioMed Central, 31 Jan. 2017, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28137294.

Calder, Philip C. “n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Inflammation, and Inflammatory Diseases.” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, June 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16841861.

Di Pasquale, Mauro G. “The Essentials of Essential Fatty Acids.” Journal of Dietary Supplements, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22435414.

Dinan, Timothy, et al. “Investigating the Inflammatory Phenotype of Major Depression: Focus on Cytokines and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.” Journal of Psychiatric Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2009, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18640689.

Gibson, Robert A, et al. “Conversion of Linoleic Acid and Alpha-Linolenic Acid to Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (LCPUFAs), with a Focus on Pregnancy, Lactation and the First 2 Years of Life.” Maternal & Child Nutrition, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Apr. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21366864.

Guesnet, Philippe, and Jean-Marc Alessandri. “Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) and the Developing Central Nervous System (CNS) – Implications for Dietary Recommendations.” Biochimie, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Jan. 2011, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20478353.

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Jabbour, H N, and K J Sales. “Prostaglandin Receptor Signalling and Function in Human Endometrial Pathology.” Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism: TEM, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2004, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15380812.

Kapoor, Rakesh, and Yung-Sheng Huang. “Gamma Linolenic Acid: an Antiinflammatory Omega-6 Fatty Acid.” Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, Dec. 2006, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17168669.

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5 Foods To Eat During The Cold and Flu Season

5 Foods To Eat During The Cold and Flu Season

The cold and flu season can cause havoc on a person’s body during the colder seasons. An individual can feel overly tired, congested, the body has aches and shivers, and lastly, the immune system will work overtime to help fight off the germs. When this happens, many remedies can help these symptoms when a person feels a little bit under the weather. They help the body give that extra boost to recover from cold and flu symptoms and can provide the body a chance to rest.

When anyone is starting to feel sick, an important note is to try and get as much rest as they possibly can. It can be anything like getting more sleep, scaling down on exercising, or take some time off of work to heal more quickly. In this article, here are some of the top 5 foods to help the body improve and recover from the cold and flu season, with some additional remedies to boost the immune system as well.

Soups

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Soups are one of the most excellent sources of feeling better during cold and flu season. They are easily digestible and helps soothe the body by containing ample waters to keep it hydrated. Water-based soups like chicken noodle, Hippocrates soup, and vegetable soup incorporates all the essential nutrients that the body needs when it is the colder season, helping to combat the flu.

Garlic

garlic

Garlic has a wide variety of health benefits that can help the body during the cold and flu season. It can help reduce the risk of heart diseases, improve mental health, and enhance the immune system. Studies have shown that whole garlic contains a compound called alliin. When garlic is chopped, chewed, or crushed, it will help boost the disease-fighting response of white blood cells in the body when they are encountering viruses that cause the common cold or flu.

Studies also stated that garlic helps support neurodegenerative health, cardiovascular health, and compromised liver functioning from excessive alcohol use. Researchers at the Toxicology, School of Public Health, Shandong University in China, have isolated the garlic compound, DADS (diallyl disulfide), as the main compound that helps protects the body from ethanol-induced oxidative stress.

Foods That Are Rich in Vitamin C

 

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Foods that contain vitamin C is highly essential when it comes to battling the cold or flu. Vitamin C is a powerful, potent supplement that has antioxidants and immune system boosters that protects the body from environmental factors like reducing oxidative stress, prevent and treat respiratory and systemic infections. With vitamin C-rich foods, they contain essential minerals, vitamins, and high in flavonoids that help individuals who don’t feel like eating or preferring bland foods to consume when they are sick. Initially, they can eat vitamin C rich food by either juice or soup. Here are some delicious fruits and juices that contain a high amount of vitamin C to combat the cold and flu.

  • Guava
  • Strawberries
  • Tomato juice
  • Oranges and Orange juice

Apple Cider Vinegar

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Apple Cider Vinegar can provide many minerals and enzymes that can fight off pathogens that can be caused by the common cold or flu. A 2011 study has shown that the probiotics in apple cider vinegar have an immune-boosting effect that can shorten the duration of a cold when an individual drinks apple cider vinegar. Taking apple cider vinegar with a glass of water can also help the body when it is not cold and flu season. Apple cider vinegar helps inhibits bacterial growth, can support healthy blood pressure levels in the body, as well as an excellent addition to the medicine cabinet during cold and flu season.

Ginger

Health-Benefits-of-Ginger

Ginger is a medicinal root plant that has been used for thousands of years. This root has been known to relieve motion sickness and nausea in the digestive system. Studies have shown that 70% of the immune system is found in the gut, and so it is highly essential that the digestive system in the body is working efficiently. Since ginger is made up of hundreds of compounds, some of them have potent antioxidants and can help support healthy inflammatory pathways in the body. Ginger can be found as a fresh root, dried, as an extract or oil, tinctures, capsules, and lozenges. Here are some of the foods that contain ginger to help the body fight the common cold or flu.

  • Ginger tea
  • Curry
  • Gingerbread
  • Cookies
  • Gingersnaps
  • Ginger ale

IMG_Dr_Jimenez_300_x_300_FADED“It is highly essential to stay hydrated during the cold and flu season. Ample fluids like water, coconut water, and herbal teas are the first line of defense.

Additionally, getting a good night’s sleep helps the immune system in the body recover faster. It is also essential to avoid eating foods like processed foods, alcohol, soda, fried foods, and dairy when it is cold and flu season. Since it can cause inflammation and aggravate the immune system when the body is trying to recover from being sick.”- Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Conclusion

All in all, when it is cold and flu season, people can start stocking up on these five remedies and taking antibiotics to get a head start on not getting sick. When the body does get sick, taking these remedies, getting lots and lots of rest, staying hydrated, and relaxing can ensure that the body will recover faster. Since food matters to people’s health, it’s vital to give the body the nourishment it needs for the cold and flu season.

October is Chiropractic Health Month. To learn more about it, check out Governor Abbott’s proclamation on our website to get full details on this declaration.

So the mechanisms of an autoimmune disease can be either by genetics or by environmental factors that can cause an individual to have problems in their body. There are many autoimmune diseases, both common and rare, that can affect the body. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. We use functional health protocols to treat injuries or chronic disorders of the musculoskeletal system. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .


References:

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Surh, Y J, et al. “Chemoprotective Properties of Some Pungent Ingredients Present in Red Pepper and Ginger.” Mutation Research, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 18 June 1998, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9675305.

Vighi, G, et al. “Allergy and the Gastrointestinal System.” Clinical and Experimental Immunology, Blackwell Science Inc, Sept. 2008, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2515351/.

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Yagnik, Darshna, et al. “Antimicrobial Activity of Apple Cider Vinegar against Escherichia Coli, Staphylococcus Aureus and Candida Albicans; Downregulating Cytokine and Microbial Protein Expression.” Scientific Reports, Nature Publishing Group UK, 29 Jan. 2018, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5788933/.