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Diets

Diets: The sum of food consumed by any living organism. The word diet is the use of specific intake of nutrition for health or weight-management. Food provides people with the necessary energy and nutrients to be healthy. By eating a variety of healthy foods, including good quality vegetables, fruits, whole-grain products and lean meats, the body can replenish itself with the essential proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals to function effectively. Having a healthy diet is one of the best things you can do to prevent and control various health problems i.e. types of cancers, heart disease, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. Dr. Alex Jimenez offers nutritional examples, as well as, describes the importance of a balanced nutrition throughout this series of articles. Dr. Jimenez emphasizes how a proper diet combined with physical activity can help individuals reach and maintain a healthy weight, reduce their risk of developing chronic diseases like heart disease, and ultimately promote overall health and wellness. For Answers to any questions you may have please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900 


Detox for Back Pain and Sciatica

Detox for Back Pain and Sciatica

The human body can absorb toxins in a variety of ways, from the type of foods we eat to the external and environmental factors we’re exposed to on a regular basis. Fortunately, the human body can also eliminate toxins in a variety of ways. Healthcare professionals have recognized that the accumulation of toxins in the human body can cause numerous health issues, including inflammation which may lead to back pain and sciatica. A good detox plan can help improve your overall health and wellness from the inside. Detoxing is also a fundamental process which can help relieve sciatica and back pain.

 

Back Pain and Sciatica

 

Back pain is one of the most common health issues reported among the general population. Although back pain affects approximately 80 percent of people at least once throughout their lifetime, sciatica continues to be one of the most frequently misunderstood health issues across the world. Also known as sciatic nerve pain, sciatica is characterized by irritation or inflammation due to the compression or impingement of the sciatic nerve, the longest and largest nerve in the human body. The sciatic nerve travels from the lower back, down the hips and buttocks, into the legs and feet.  

 

A variety of alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help safely and effectively treat sciatica symptoms without the side-effects of drugs and/or medications. Many healthcare professionals may recommend the use of drugs and/or medications to help offer sciatic nerve pain relief, however, these are only managing the symptoms rather than treating the health issue at the source. Research studies demonstrated that 76 percent of patients with sciatica reported complete relief of their symptoms without any toxic side-effects after following a detox plan for 45 days.  

 

Detox for Sciatica and Back Pain

 

For those people who may not be sure how or where to start with a detox plan, it’s fundamental for you to know that you can detox the human body on a variety of levels. First, you can start off with a simple foot detox. Healthcare professionals have demonstrated that a detox foot bath is a good way to cleanse the human body. Best known as the BioElectric Field Enhancement Unit, this helps generate positive and negative ions which creates the pH balance in the human body. As a result, the human body’s negative ions decrease while the human body’s positive ions increased to provide pain relief.  

 

To perform a detox foot bath, soak your feet for 30 minutes in warm salt water together with the foot coil. This process can help give muscles the strength and endurance they need to deal with back pain and sciatica symptoms. Moreover, a detox foot bath can also help eliminate free radicals which enhance range of motion. A detox foot bath also supports circulation. A good detox plan to help improve sciatica and back pain can also include following proper nutrition. Healthcare professionals can recommend a diet food plan which can help detox the human body from the inside with other treatment approaches.  

 

As previously mentioned, nutrition and lifestyle modifications below can help cleanse and detox the human body, including:  

 

  • Drinking more water, at least a minimum of two liters a day.
  • Drinking freshly squeezed juices without adding sugar, several times a day.
  • Replacing one meal with fresh smoothies, preferably breakfast.
  • Eating a healthy diet without processed foods, red meat, sugar, and dairy products.

 

According to healthcare professionals, it is a healthy practice to follow a detox plan once every 3 to 4 months. Do you remember when was the last time you had a detox? Or do you at least remember ever having a moment where you considered detoxification? Whether you followed a detox plan a few months ago, a year ago, several years ago, many years ago or simply never, it doesn’t matter. There is no better time then to start now. A detox plan cleanses the bloodstream, improves gut health, channels energy levels and strengthens muscles. Detox helps improve sciatica from its source.  

 

Sciatica is a collection of symptoms which can manifest due to a variety of underlying health issues. However, numerous research studies have demonstrated that following a detox plan can help tremendously reduce irritation and inflammation associated with sciatic nerve pain. Following a proper nutrition and lifestyle modifications together with a detox plan can ultimately help improve overall health and wellness, including sciatica and back pain. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 


 

Non-Invasive Treatments for Chronic Low Back Pain

NON INVASIVE CARE FOR CHRONIC LBP

 


 

Following a detox plan may help pain and inflammation associated with sciatica. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .  

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez  

 


 

Additional Topic Discussion: Severe Sciatica

 

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. Your spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of sciatica, or sciatic nerve pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of painful symptoms, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have these results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease sciatic nerve pain, or sciatica, through the utilization of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.  

 

 


 

Formulas for Methylation Support

 

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN’s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

Proudly, Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

  For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link.*XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download  

 

* All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.  

 


 

 

How Foods Can Affect Sciatica

How Foods Can Affect Sciatica

Sciatica is a health issue caused by the compression or impingement of the sciatic nerve, or the longest and largest nerve in the human body. Patients with sciatica can experience painful symptoms anywhere along the length of the sciatic nerve. Common symptoms associated with sciatica include pain and discomfort, tingling sensations, numbness, and weakness.  

 

Sciatic nerve pain can be caused by a variety of health issues,  such as herniated discs, spinal stenosis, pregnancy, scar tissue, tight muscles, sacroiliac joint dysfunction, degenerative disc disease, tumors, and infection. Sciatic nerve pain can occur along one or both sides of the human body. According to numerous research studies, inflammation caused by an improper diet can cause sciatic nerve pain. Below, we will discuss how certain types of foods, both good and bad, can affect sciatica.  

 

Good Foods for Sciatica

 

Patients with sciatica caused by muscle spasms, such as piriformis syndrome, can benefit from consuming a variety of magnesium-rich foods. The human body uses magnesium to help release muscle contractions. Several magnesium-rich foods include dairy products, fish, meat, seafood, apples, apricots, brown rice, dulse, and lima beans. Foods with considerable amounts of vitamin B-12, such as liver, clams, oysters, lamb, and cheese, might also be beneficial for sciatic nerve pain.  

 

Halibut is a magnesium-rich food which may help treat sciatica associated with tight muscles or muscle spasms. Halibut contains numerous nutrients, including tryptophan, selenium, phosphorus, magnesium, protein, omega-3 fatty acids and vitamins B3, B6 and B12. The significantly increased levels of vitamin B12 in halibut can also help reduce painful symptoms. Halibut is also used to help treat cardiovascular problems, such as heart arrhythmia and elevated blood pressure.  

 

Because sciatica is a collection of symptoms rather than a single condition, patients with sciatic nerve pain should seek help from a healthcare professional to determine if an underlying health issue is causing the painful symptoms. In some cases, sciatic nerve pain may be caused by a serious problem, such as a tumor. Although further research studies may be needed to confirm the benefits of foods for sciatica, more research studies still have demonstrated how foods can also affect sciatica.  

 

Bad Foods for Sciatica

 

According to numerous research studies, eating a low-nutrient diet or a diet which may cause weight gain can ultimately cause a variety of health issues, including sciatic nerve pain and inflammation. Consuming foods rich in B-vitamins are essential for healthy nerve tissue. When we eat refined grain products, valuable nutrients are lost through the process, including B-vitamins. To make sure we eat nutrient dense foods, choose whole grains over refined grain products, such as white bread, instant rice, enriched pasta, low-fiber cereals and baked goods prepared with white, baking or cake flour.  

 

Added sugars are ingredients which add sweet flavor and calories to foods, however, they offer very little nutrients. These are also high-glycemic and they may have a considerable impact on blood sugar levels. A high-glycemic diet can increase inflammation and it also leaves less room for beneficial, anti-inflammatory foods, including fresh fruits and vegetables. Foods and beverages particularly high in added sugars include regular soft drinks, candy, pancake syrup, frosting, sweetened cereals, frozen desserts and commercially-prepared cakes, cookies, pies, and brownies, among other foods and beverages.  

 

Saturated fats can also increase inflammation. The American Heart Association recommends restricting the consumption of saturated fats to less than 7 percent of total daily calories. Common sources of saturated fats include red and processed meats, dark-meat poultry, poultry skin, high-fat dairy products, fried foods, and egg yolks. Healthcare professionals recommend replacing saturated fats in your diet with omega-3 fatty acids, or healthy fats with anti-inflammatory properties, to reduce sciatica. Sources of omega-3s include cold-water fish like salmon and mackerel, flaxseeds, canola oil, and walnuts.  

 

Trans-fats, also well-known as trans-fatty acids, are chemically-produced fats which can increase LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol and decrease HDL, or “good,” cholesterol. According to research studies, trans-fats are also pro-inflammatory substances and they can ultimately account for less than 1 percent of the calories in a heart-healthy diet. Common sources of trans-fats include stick margarine, shortening, and commercial foods which list hydrogenated vegetable oil as an ingredient.  

 

Sciatica, or sciatic nerve pain, can be caused by a variety of underlying health issues, including herniated discs and spinal stenosis, among other spine problems. However, numerous research studies have demonstrated that the foods we eat can affect painful symptoms, such as those associated with sciatic nerve pain or sciatica. “Good” foods can help reduce sciatica symptoms while “bad” foods can increase sciatica symptoms, affecting overall health and wellness. – Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

 


 

Non-Invasive Treatments for Chronic Low Back Pain

 

NON INVASIVE CARE FOR CHRONIC LBP

 


 

A healthy diet may help manage pain and inflammation associated with sciatica. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .  

 

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez  


 

Additional Topic Discussion: Severe Sciatica

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. Your spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of sciatica, or sciatic nerve pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of painful symptoms, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have these results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease sciatic nerve pain, or sciatica, through the utilization of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

 

 
 

 

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

 

XYMOGEN’s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

Proudly, Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link.*XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download   * All of the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.  

 


 

 

Methylation Donors for Methylation Support

Methylation Donors for Methylation Support

Can methylation donors help promote a balanced methylation support?

Many doctors and functional medicine practitioners generally recommend higher doses of methyl donors, such as 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, or 5-MTHF, and methylcobalamin, in several patients. By way of instance, people with genetic polymorphisms and people with out-of-range methylation-related biomarkers, such as in hyperhomocysteinemia, may often develop health issues which may affect the function of specific enzymes, such as methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, or MTHFR, among others.

Nutrient deficiencies associated with methyl donors are a prevalent finding in laboratory evaluations, and depending on your population, these may be closely associated with vitamin B12 deficiency-related neuropathy, which is relatively common. Many doctors and functional medicine practitioners also understand the importance of methylation support to help improve hereditary or environmental epigenetic health issues. Improving methylation status and avoiding the pathways of disease and dysfunction associated with potential nutritional deficits in methylation activity is the goal of many healthcare professionals.

However, as with any other biochemical process, methylation activity occurs through the balance of homeodynamics, or the dynamic form of homeostasis. An imbalance in these biochemical processes can ultimately lead to dysfunction and disease. Therefore, although we can be confident that making sure we have enough methyl donors available for use in the human body is essential, we have to question whether “pushing” reaction rates utilizing supraphysiological doses are safe and effective. Instead of forcing reaction rates, perhaps the goal of healthcare professionals should ultimately be to allow the human body to function correctly.

Methylation Supplementation

Numerous health issues associated with long-term, high-dose supplementation for methylation donors include:

According to research studies, the effects of these genetic alterations remains unclear. In comparison to the altered function of MTHFR C677T and A1298C single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, which have been moderately evaluated, the diagnosis of other SNPs can demonstrate the overall function of these specific enzymes. The effect of these SNPs on methylation activity depends on enzymes working together in the circumstance of a person’s internal and external environment. These outcome measures have been demonstrated in a variety of genome research studies. As a result, researchers are unable to determine the effects which these alterations, including that of MTHFR C677T, can develop on a patient’s overall methylation status.

The correct supplementation dose for methylation donors remains mostly unknown, as it may vary tremendously between patients. No research studies have currently demonstrated what the correct dosage or duration of methyl-donor supplementation is required to balance biochemical and epigenetic methylation status. Various side effects of high-dose 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, or 5-MTHF, supplementation have been demonstrated in clinical practice, including anxiety and worsening of symptoms.

Hypermethylation may be detrimental to an individual’s overall health and wellness. The following series of articles contain many examples of region-specific DNA hypermethylation health issues, including immune dysfunction, Downs Syndrome, and cancer. Both DNA hyper- and hypomethylation can develop due to deficiencies in methylation donors. Folic acid has been associated with increased immune hypersensitivity and cancer. The bottom line is that we don’t understand what effect long-term, high-dose methylation donors and supplementation can have on DNA methylation support. Further research studies are still required to show this effect.

Dr Jimenez White Coat

Methylation is a biochemical process which involves the conversion of methylation activity for the function of a variety of processes in the human body. Methylation imbalances, however, can cause a variety of health issues. Methylation donors are a form of supplementation for methylation support. But, research studies have demonstrated that supplementation for methylation support may not be right for everyone. The best way to improve methylation is through proper nutrition, physical activity, and exercise, among other dietary and lifestyle modifications. The nutritional guidelines below can help safely and effectively improve methylation support, promoting overall health and wellness.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Nutrition for Methylation Support

Methylation status can often depend on a patient’s dietary and lifestyle factors. Dietary and lifestyle factors, including physical activity and exercise, stress, sleep, medicines, and toxin exposure, plays a role in methylation. Single interventions with high-dose nutrient supplementation may lack long-term effectiveness or these may not achieve the desired methylation support.

Dietary and lifestyle modifications are safe and effective, alternative treatment options for most individuals with methylation imbalances. This may be fundamental for certain vulnerable individuals, such as patients with active cancers. Aging is also known to be associated with decreased methylation activity, therefore, the Methylation Diet and Lifestyle, or MDL, program can be utilized as an anti-aging tool. Methylation status diagnosis and treatment is essential during preconception, pregnancy and the postnatal period.

The MDL program and supplementation can help promote overall health and wellness. A dietary and lifestyle treatment approach can also be utilized as a follow-up plan for people who need high-dose nutraceutical support. A variety of foods can promote methylation support. Dietary and lifestyle modifications have also been demonstrated to considerably improve methylation activity.

In the following articles, we will discuss dietary and lifestyle factors which can help support methylation. We will also discuss the basic biochemistry of methylation, the roles of methylation in the human body, how to evaluate methylation status, and the risks and benefits of methyl donor supplementation as well as the health issues associated with too little or too much methylation activity.

Smoothies and Juices for Methylation Support

While many healthcare professionals can recommend nutritional guidelines and lifestyle modifications, there are several alternative treatment options you can try for yourself at home. As described above, however, supplementation for methylation support should be correctly determined by a healthcare professional. Smoothies and juices are a fast and easy way to include all the necessary nutrients you need for methylation support in a single serving. The smoothies and juices below are part of the Methylation Diet Food Plan.

Sea Green Smoothie
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1/2 cup cantaloupe, cubed
• 1/2 banana
• 1 handful of kale or spinach
• 1 handful of Swiss chard
• 1/4 avocado
• 2 teaspoons spirulina powder
• 1 cup water
• 3 or more ice cubes
Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender until completely smooth and enjoy!

Berry Bliss Smoothie
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1/2 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen, preferably wild)
• 1 medium carrot, roughly chopped
• 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed or chia seed
• 1 tablespoons almonds
• Water (to desired consistency)
• Ice cubes (optional, may omit if using frozen blueberries)
Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth and creamy. Best served immediately!

Sweet and Spicy Juice
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1 cup honeydew melons
• 3 cups spinach, rinsed
• 3 cups Swiss chard, rinsed
• 1 bunch cilantro (leaves and stems), rinsed
• 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped
• 2-3 knobs whole turmeric root (optional), rinsed, peeled and chopped
Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately!

Ginger Greens Juice
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1 cup pineapple cubes
• 1 apple, sliced
• 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped
• 3 cups kale, rinsed and roughly chopped or ripped
• 5 cups Swiss chard, rinsed and roughly chopped or ripped
Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately!

Zesty Beet Juice
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1 grapefruit, peeled and sliced
• 1 apple, washed and sliced
• 1 whole beet, and leaves if you have them, washed and sliced
• 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped
Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately!

Protein Power Smoothie
Serving: 1
Cook time: 5 minutes
• 1 scoop protein powder
• 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed
• 1/2 banana
• 1 kiwi, peeled
• 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
• Pinch of cardamom
• Non-dairy milk or water, enough to achieve desired consistency
Blend all ingredients in a high-powered blender until completely smooth. Best served immediately!

ProLon® Fasting Mimicking Diet

alanced methylation support can be achieved through proper nutrition. The ProLon® fasting mimicking diet offers a 5-day meal program which has been individually packed and labeled to serve the foods you need for the FMD in precise quantities and combinations. The meal program is made up of ready-to-eat or easy-to-prepare, plant-based foods, including bars, soups, snacks, supplements, a drink concentrate, and teas. The products are scientifically formulated and great tasting. Before starting the ProLon® fasting mimicking diet, 5-day meal program, please make sure to talk to a healthcare professional to find out if the FMD is right for you. The ProLon® fasting mimicking diet can help promote methylation support, among a variety of other healthy benefits.

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Many doctors and functional medicine practitioners may recommend higher doses of methyl donors in several patients, however, further research studies are needed to determine the proper amount of methylation supplementation. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, musculoskeletal and nervous health issues as well as functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. Your spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

Formulas for Methylation Support

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

XYMOGEN’s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

Proudly, Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link.*XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

* All the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

***

The Importance Of Methylation Support

The Importance Of Methylation Support

What is systems medicine and how is it integrated into our overall health and wellness?

Systems medicine is an interdisciplinary field of study which evaluates the systems of the human body as part of a whole, including biochemical, physiological, and environmental interactions. And, with the outlining of the human genome back in 2001, Systems Medicine became widely recognized.

Humans are estimated to have between 20,000 and 25,000 genes although this number could drop further as genome sequence quality and gene finding methods improve over time. While the code for our lives seems smaller than what we expected, tremendous consideration is now being paid to the regulatory aspects of the genome and research studies on the heritable epigenome are gaining momentum. Methylation, a cornerstone epigenetic and metabolic process, now yields more than 85,000 hits on a PubMed search.

With the readily available access to genetic testing, many patients now have a greater understanding of their genes, most often concerning their single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, associated with methylation. It truly is a wildly exciting time to be practicing Functional Medicine, the clinical application of systems medicine. Several hypotheses have been developed on the phenotypic expression of single nucleotide variations. A heterozygous mutation in MTHFR A1298C SNP, by way of instance, can make it difficult for people to detoxify efficiently. Genetic testing and metabolic biomarkers can help demonstrate “lesions” in methylation.

What is Methylation Support?

Methylation is fundamental towards a variety of bodily functions, including detoxification, neurotransmitter production, and epigenetic regulation. Researchers have seen the impact that improving methylation can have on fortifying folic acid and reducing neural tube defects. The Methylation Diet and Lifestyle, or MDL, program was created with the purpose of embracing both the importance of healthy methylation balance as well as recognizing the limitations in our current understanding of methylation.

Methylation imbalances, such as hypermethylation and hypomethylation, in the gene promoter regions are associated with many health issues, from allergies and aging to neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. The regulation of the epigenome is a highly complex process. And, further research studies are still required to determine the effect of high-dose, long-term methylation interventions.

Furthermore, healthcare professionals need to consider whether high-dose, long-term methylation interventions are the right treatment approach for patients with these health issues. Numerous research studies have demonstrated reasonable concerns about supplementation. There are also patients who are unable to take methyl donor supplementation due to poor epinephrine clearance and other biogenic amines or detoxification activity. Understanding whether this treatment approach may be an appropriate methylation intervention, however, suggests that other, alternative treatment options may be required for overall health and wellness.

Food-based folates, by way of instance, have only been demonstrated to have protective effects on methylation. A variety of phytochemicals, not closely associated with methylation, seem to effectively modulate global epigenetic and biochemical methylation activity. And, decreasing methyl donor depletion by reducing toxic exposures, nourishing the microbiome, and increasing the stress response is safe and efficient. Nutrition can ultimately help eliminate the “lesions” in methylation for balanced bodily functions.

Dr Jimenez White Coat

Methylation is a simple biochemical process which affects a variety of bodily functions, including DNA production, detoxification, and cellular energy, among many other fundamental processes. However, approximately 60 percent of people in the United States have a genetic mutation which tremendously affects methylation. When methylation isn’t working efficiently, it can affect the production of a variety of important molecules, including glutathione, coenzyme Q10, and melatonin, among many other fundamental substances. Understanding the importance of methylation support is important towards our overall health and wellness, and there are several ways you and your doctor can promote better methylation support.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

The Methylation Diet and Lifestyle Program

The Methylation Diet and Lifestyle program wouldn’t have been created if it wasn’t for the years of discussions on current research studies and patient treatment approaches. The following article serves as a guide to help people how to evaluate their methylation status and understand the current methylation health issues, and how to incorporate an MDL program into your protocols as well as the potential concerns from supplementation. Nutritional guidelines and lifestyle modifications can help improve methylation.

However, how can we determine when we should utilize the MDL? This treatment approach ultimately offers the methylation support patients might need, especially for those who cannot tolerate supplementation. It is also a safe and effective long-term strategy for a majority of patients who have utilized a short-term course of higher-dose methyl donors. The full MDL program also supports detoxification, microbiome and hormone balance, stress reduction, and it can be modified to incorporate other programs which are also generally recommended, such as elimination diets, grain and lectin-free plans, low FODMAP diets and traditional gut restoration programs. Highly restricted plans, such as the ketogenic diet used for epilepsy, can incorporate aspects of the MDL with additional nutraceutical support. Any dietary program can work with the Methylation Diet and lifestyle program for overall health and wellness.

Smoothies and Juices for Life

While many healthcare professionals can recommend the nutritional guidelines and lifestyle modifications described above, there are several remedies you can try for yourself at home. Smoothies and juices are a fast and easy way to include all the necessary nutrients you need for methylation support in a single serving. The smoothies and juices below are part of the Methylation Diet Food Plan.

Sea Green Smoothie
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1/2 cup cantaloupe, cubed
• 1/2 banana
• 1 handful of kale or spinach
• 1 handful of Swiss chard
• 1/4 avocado
• 2 teaspoons spirulina powder
• 1 cup water
• 3 or more ice cubes
Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender until completely smooth and enjoy!

Berry Bliss Smoothie
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1/2 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen, preferably wild)
• 1 medium carrot, roughly chopped
• 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed or chia seed
• 1 tablespoons almonds
• Water (to desired consistency)
• Ice cubes (optional, may omit if using frozen blueberries)
Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth and creamy. Best served immediately!

Sweet and Spicy Juice
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1 cup honeydew melons
• 3 cups spinach, rinsed
• 3 cups Swiss chard, rinsed
• 1 bunch cilantro (leaves and stems), rinsed
• 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped
• 2-3 knobs whole turmeric root (optional), rinsed, peeled and chopped
Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately!

Ginger Greens Juice
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1 cup pineapple cubes
• 1 apple, sliced
• 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped
• 3 cups kale, rinsed and roughly chopped or ripped
• 5 cups Swiss chard, rinsed and roughly chopped or ripped
Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately!

Zesty Beet Juice
Servings: 1
Cook time: 5-10 minutes
• 1 grapefruit, peeled and sliced
• 1 apple, washed and sliced
• 1 whole beet, and leaves if you have them, washed and sliced
• 1-inch knob of ginger, rinsed, peeled and chopped
Juice all ingredients in a high-quality juicer. Best served immediately!

Protein Power Smoothie
Serving: 1
Cook time: 5 minutes
• 1 scoop protein powder
• 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed
• 1/2 banana
• 1 kiwi, peeled
• 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
• Pinch of cardamom
• Non-dairy milk or water, enough to achieve desired consistency
Blend all ingredients in a high-powered blender until completely smooth. Best served immediately!

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-3.png

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The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, spinal health issues, and functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. Your spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

XYMOGEN’s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

Proudly, Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link.*XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

* All the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

***

Fasting and Chronic Pain

Fasting and Chronic Pain

Chronic pain is a common health issue which affects many people in the United States. While several medical conditions, such as fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndrome, can cause chronic pain, it may also develop due to a variety of other health issues. Research studies have found that widespread inflammation is the leading cause of chronic pain. Inflammation is a natural defense mechanism to injury, illness, or infection. But, if the inflammatory process continues for too long, it can become problematic.

Inflammation signals the immune system to heal and repair damaged tissue as well as to protect itself against bacteria and viruses. As mentioned above, however, chronic inflammation can cause a variety of health issues, including chronic pain symptoms. Healthy lifestyle modifications can help manage chronic pain, but first, let’s understand the common causes of chronic pain.

What is Acute Inflammation?

Acute inflammation, by way of instance, occurs following an injury or something as simple as a sore throat. It is a natural response with adverse effects, meaning it works locally in the region where the health issue is found. The common signs of acute inflammation include swelling, redness, warmth, pain and loss of function, as stated by the National Library of Medicine. When acute inflammation develops, the blood vessels dilate causing blood flow to increase, and white blood cells in the injured region promote recovery.

During severe inflammation, compounds called cytokines are released by the damaged tissue. The cytokines act as “emergency signals” which bring on the human body’s own immune cells, as well as hormones and numerous nutrients to repair the health issue. Additionally, hormone-like substances, known as prostaglandins, cause blood clots to heal damaged tissue, and these may also trigger fever and pain as part of the inflammatory procedure. As the damage or injury recovers, the inflammation subsides.

What is Chronic Inflammation?

Unlike acute inflammation, chronic inflammation has long-term effects. Chronic inflammation, also known as persistent inflammation, produces low-levels of inflammation throughout the human body, as demonstrated by an increase in immune system markers located in blood and cell tissues. Chronic inflammation may also cause the progression of various diseases and conditions. Elevated levels of inflammation may sometimes trigger even if there is no injury, illness, or infection, which may also cause the immune system to react.

As a result, the human body’s immune system could begin attacking healthy cells, tissues, or organs. Researchers are still trying to understand the consequences of chronic inflammation in the human body and the mechanisms involved in this natural defense process. By way of instance, chronic inflammation has been associated with a variety of health issues, such as heart disease, and stroke.

One theory suggests that when inflammation remains in the blood vessels, it can encourage the accumulation of plaque. According to the American Heart Association, or the AHA, if the immune system identifies plaque as a foreign invader, the white blood cells can attempt to wall off the plaque found in the blood flowing through the arteries. This can create a blood clot which may block the blood flow to the heart or brain, causing it to become unstable and rupture. Cancer is another health issue associated with chronic inflammation. Furthermore, according to the National Cancer Institute, DNA damage can also be caused by chronic inflammation.

Persistent, low-grade inflammation frequently doesn’t have any symptoms, but healthcare professionals can check for a C-reactive protein, or CRP, known as lipoic acid, a marker for inflammation found in the blood. Elevated levels of CRP are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Elevated CRP levels may be found in chronic disorders like lupus or rheumatoid arthritis.

In the case of other chronic conditions, such as fibromyalgia, the nervous system over-reacts to specific stimulation, however, it’s inflammation which causes chronic pain symptoms. Subjectively, it’s almost impossible to tell the difference between the chronic pain caused by an oversensitive nervous system and the chronic pain caused by widespread inflammation. Apart from searching for clues in the bloodstream, a person’s nutrition, lifestyle habits, and environmental exposures, can also promote chronic inflammation.

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Inflammation is the immune system’s natural defense mechanism against injury, illness, or infection. While this inflammatory response can help heal and repair tissues, chronic, widespread inflammation can cause a variety of health issues, including chronic pain symptoms. A balanced nutrition, including a variety of diets and fasting, can help reduce inflammation. Fasting, also known as caloric restriction, promotes cell apoptosis and mitochondrial recovery. The fasting mimicking diet, which is a part of the longevity diet plan, is a dietary program which “tricks” the human body into a fasting state to experience the benefits of traditional fasting. Before following any of the diets described in this article, make sure to consult a doctor.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

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Nutrition, Diets, Fasting and Chronic Pain

Anti-inflammatory diets mainly consist of eating fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, and fats. The Mediterranean diet plan, by way of instance, is an anti-inflammatory diet which promotes eating moderate amounts of nuts, ingesting very little meat, and drinking wine. Anti-inflammatory food parts, such as omega-3 fatty acids, protect the human body against the damage brought on by inflammation.

An anti-inflammatory diet also involves staying away from foods which could promote inflammation. It is ideal to decrease the amount of foods you eat which are high in trans and saturated fats, such as meats. Additionally, an anti-inflammatory diet limits the consumption of refined carbohydrates and foods, such as bread and rice. These also promote cutting back on the utilization of margarine and oils that are packed with omega-6 fatty acids, such as sunflower, safflower and corn oils.

Fasting, or caloric restriction, has long been known to decrease oxidative stress and slow down the mechanisms of aging in various organisms. The effects of fasting involve programmed cell death, or apoptosis, transcription, mobile energy efficiency, mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant mechanisms, and circadian rhythm. Fasting also contributes to mitochondrial autophagy, known as mitophagy, where genes in the mitochondria are stimulated to undergo apoptosis, which promotes mitochondrial recovery.

Intermittent fasting can help you fight inflammation, improve digestion, and boost your longevity. The human body is designed to be able to survive for extended periods of time without food. Research studies have demonstrated that intermittent fasting can have positive changes in the overall composition of your gut microbiota. Moreover, intermittent fasting can reduce insulin resistance while increasing the immune system response. Finally, intermittent fasting can promote the production of a substance, known as β-hydroxybutyrate, that blocks a portion of the immune system involved in inflammatory ailments as well as substantially reducing the production of inflammatory markers, such as cytokines and the C-reactive protein, or CRP, previously mentioned above.

The Longevity Diet Plan, presented in the book by Dr. Valter Longo, eliminates the consumption of processed foods which can cause inflammation, promoting well-being and longevity. This unique dietary program, unlike most traditional diets, doesn’t promote weight loss. Although you may experience weight reduction, the emphasis of this unique dietary program is on eating healthier. The Longevity Diet Plan has been demonstrated to help activate stem cell-based renewal, reduce abdominal fat, and prevent age-related bone and muscle loss, as well as build resistance to developing cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and cancer.

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The fasting mimicking diet, or FMD, allows you to experience the benefits of traditional fasting without depriving your body of food. The main difference of the FMD is that instead of completely eliminating all food for several days or even weeks, you only restrict your calorie intake for five days out of the month. The FMD can be practiced once a month to help promote overall health and wellness.

While anyone can follow the FMD on their own, the ProLon® fasting mimicking diet offers a 5-day meal program which has been individually packed and labeled for each day, that serves the foods you need for the FMD in precise quantities and combinations. The meal program is made up of ready-to-eat or easy-to-prepare, plant-based foods, including bars, soups, snacks, supplements, a drink concentrate, and teas. Before starting the ProLon® fasting mimicking diet, 5-day meal program, or any of the lifestyle modifications described above, please make sure to talk to a healthcare professional to find out which chronic pain treatment is right for you.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, spinal health issues, and functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions. To further discuss the subject matter above, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. Your spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

XYMOGEN’s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

Proudly, Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link.*XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

* All the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

***

What is the Longevity Diet Plan?

What is the Longevity Diet Plan?

Adhering to a specific diet to maintain proper nutrition can sometimes make eating stressful. Natural lifestyle modifications are the key to changing your eating habits and this can help you live a longer, healthier life. The Longevity Diet Plan, created by Dr. Valter Longo, is a selection of practical eating guidelines which focuses on changing your eating patterns to achieve overall health and wellness.

The Rules of The Longevity Diet Plan

By merely following the nutritional tips below, you can overhaul your current diet plan and start eating healthier without all the stress of a traditional diet. The Longevity Diet Plan eliminates the consumption of processed foods that can cause a variety of health issues and boosts the consumption of nutrients that promote longevity. This unique dietary program shares the results of approximately 25 years of research studies all on a simple solution which can help people experience overall well-being through proper nutrition.

However, unlike most traditional diets, the Longevity Diet Plan doesn’t promote weight loss. Although you may experience weight reduction, the emphasis of this unique dietary program is on eating healthier. The Longevity Diet Plan has been demonstrated to help you activate stem cell-based renewal, lose weight and reduce abdominal fat, prevent age-related bone and muscle loss, build resistance to developing cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and cancer, as well as extend longevity. Below, we will summarize the 8 most common nutritional tips of the Longevity Diet Plan which can ultimately help make your life longer and healthier.

Dr Jimenez White Coat

The Longevity Diet Plan is a unique dietary program designed by Dr. Valter Longo to promote overall health, wellness, and longevity. Through simple lifestyle modifications, people can change their eating habits and take advantage of the many health benefits of this dietary program. By following a pescatarian diet and following the ProLon® Fasting Mimicking Diet, among the other nutritional tips described below, people can live longer and healthier lives. Traditional diets can often be difficult and stressful to follow, however, the Longevity Diet Plan is a practical and unique dietary program which can be suitable for many people.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

8 Nutritional Tips of the Longevity Diet Plan

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Follow a Pescatarian Diet

As a part of the Longevity Diet Plan, follow a pescatarian diet, which is almost 100 percent plant and fish-based. Also, make sure to limit fish consumption to two or three servings every week, avoiding fish with higher mercury content, such as tuna, swordfish, mackerel, and halibut. If you’re over 65 and you begin to experience reduced muscle mass, strength, and fat, add more fish into your diet alongside other animal-based foods, including eggs and specific cheeses, such as feta or pecorino, and yogurt made from goat’s milk.

Don’t Eat Too Much Protein

According to the Longevity Diet Plan, we should eat 0.31 to 0.36 grams of protein per pound of body fat every day. If you weigh 130lbs, you should eat about 40 to 47 grams of protein per day, or an equivalent of 1.5 filets of salmon, 1 cup of chickpeas or 2 1/2 cups of lentils, of which 30 grams should be consumed in one meal. If you weigh 200 to 220lbs, you should eat about 60 to 70 grams of protein per day, or an equivalent of two fillets of salmon, 3 1/2 cups of lentils or 1 1/2 cups of chickpeas. Protein consumption should be increased after age 65. For the majority of us, a 10 to 20 percent increase, or 5 to 10 grams more each day, is enough. Finally, the Longevity Diet is free of animal proteins like red meat, white meat, and poultry, with the exception of animal proteins in fish. This unique dietary program instead is comparatively high in vegetable proteins like legumes and nuts to optimize health and wellness.

Increase Good Fats and Complex Carbohydrates

As a part of the Longevity Diet Plan, you should eat higher amounts of polyunsaturated fats, such as those found in salmon, almonds, walnuts, and olive oil, while you should eat lower amounts of saturated, hydrogenated, and trans fats. Likewise, as a part of the Longevity Diet Plan, you should also eat complex carbohydrates, such as those found in whole wheat bread, legumes, and vegetables. Make sure to limit eating pasta, rice, bread, fruit, and fruit juices, which can be converted to sugars by the time they reach your gut.

Take Dietary Supplements

The human body needs proteins, essential fatty acids like omega-3 and omega-6, vitamins, minerals, and even sugars to function correctly. Whenever your intake of certain nutrients becomes too low, the repair, replacement, and defense methods of the human body can slow down or stop, allowing fungi, bacteria, and viruses to cause damage which can lead to a variety of health issues. Take vitamin and mineral dietary supplements, especially for omega-3, as recommended by your healthcare professional.

Eat Various Foods from your Ancestry

To take in all of the necessary nutrients you need, you have to eat a wide variety of foods, but it’s best to choose foods that were common on your parents’, grandparents’, and great-grandparents’ table. By way of instance, in many northern European countries where milk has been generally consumed, lactose intolerance is relatively rare, whereas lactose intolerance is quite common in southern European and Asian countries, where milk was not historically part of the conventional diet of adults. If a person of Japanese ancestry residing in the United States suddenly decides to begin drinking milk, which was probably rarely served in their grandparents’ dining table, they will probably start feeling sick. The most common problems in these cases are intolerances or autoimmunities, such as the response to gluten-rich foods like bread and pasta seen in people with celiac disease. Although further evidence is needed, it is possible that food intolerances could be related to many autoimmune disorders, including diabetes, colitis, and Crohn’s disease.

Eat Two Meals a Day and a Snack

According to the Longevity Diet Plan, it is ideal to eat breakfast and one major meal plus a nourishing low-calorie, low-sugar snack every day. While for some people it may be recommended to eat three meals and a snack every day. Many nutritional guidelines recommend that we should eat five to six meals every day. When people are advised to eat frequently, it can often become difficult for them to regulate their calorie intake. Over the last twenty years, approximately 70 percent of the population in the United States is considered to be overweight or obese. It’s much more difficult to overeat on the Longevity Diet Plan if you eat only two and a half meals every day. It would take massive portions of legumes, vegetables, and fish to reach the amount that would lead to weight gain. The high nourishment of the meals, plus the amount of the meal, sends a signal to your stomach and your brain that you have had enough food. This one major meal system may sometimes have to be broken down into two meals to avoid digestion issues. Adults and older people prone to weight loss should eat three meals a day. For people trying to lose weight as well as for people who are overweight or obese, the best nutritional advice would be to eat breakfast daily; have dinner or lunch, but not both, and substitute for the missed meal with one snack containing fewer than 100 calories and no more than 3 to 5 g of sugar. Which meal you skip depends upon your lifestyle, however, it’s not recommended to skip breakfast due to its adverse health issues. The benefit of skipping lunch is more free time and energy. But, there is a drawback for eating a large dinner, particularly for people who suffer from acid reflux or sleeping problems. The drawback for skipping dinner, however, is that it may eliminate the social meal of their day.

Eat Within a 12-Hour Window Every Day

Another common eating habit adopted by many centenarians is time-restricted eating or limiting all meals and snacks within a 12-hour window every day. The efficiency of this method was demonstrated in both human and animal research studies. Generally, you would eat breakfast at 8 a.m. and then eat dinner by 8 p.m.. A briefer eating window of ten hours or less can be even better for weight loss, but it’s considerably harder to maintain and it might increase the risk of developing side effects, such as gallstones and even potentially increasing the chance of developing cardiovascular disease. You should not eat three to four hours before sleeping.

Follow the ProLon® Fasting Mimicking Diet

Healthy people under the age of 65 should follow the ProLon® Fasting Mimicking Diet, 5-day meal program at least twice every year. The FMD is one of the key principles promoted by the Longevity Diet Plan. The fasting mimicking diet offers the same health benefits of fasting without actually fasting. By eating 800 to 1,100 calories in precise quantities and combinations of foods which have been individually packed and labeled for each day, you can “trick” the human body into a fasting state. Through various research studies, Dr. Valter Longo discovered that by depriving the body of food in this manner, our cells begin breaking down and regenerating our internal tissues, through a process known as autophagy, killing and replacing, or regenerating, damaged cells. Additionally, fasting can reverse various health issues, destroy cancer cells and significantly reduce the possibility of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

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With the Longevity Diet Plan presented in the book by Dr. Valter Longo, you’ll eat better, feel better and, although it’s not designed as a weight loss plan, you may even shed a few pounds. You’re not going to have to consider complex food rules and make difficult choices with this unique dietary program. Once you get the hang of these lifestyle modifications, you’ll be able to improve your overall health and wellness as well as your longevity. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, spinal health issues, and functional medicine topics. To further discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. Your spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

XYMOGEN’s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

Proudly, Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link.*XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

* All the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

***

Fasting Mimicking Diet Explained

Fasting Mimicking Diet Explained

Understanding the ProLon® Fasting Mimicking Diet

Fasting is associated with numerous health benefits; from weight loss to longevity. There are many different types of fasting methods, such as intermittent fasting. The fasting mimicking diet allows you to experience the benefits of traditional fasting without depriving your body of food. The main difference of the FMD is that instead of completely eliminating all food for several days or even weeks, you only restrict your calorie intake for five days out of the month. The FMD can be practiced once a month to promote well-being.

While anyone can follow the FMD on their own, the ProLon® fasting mimicking diet offers a 5-day meal program which has been individually packed and labeled for each day and it serves the foods you need for the FMD in precise quantities and combinations. The meal program is made up of ready-to-eat or easy-to-prepare, plant-based foods, including bars, soups, snacks, supplements, a drink concentrate, and teas. The products are scientifically formulated and great tasting. Before starting the ProLon® fasting mimicking diet, 5-day meal program, please make sure to talk to a healthcare professional to find out if the FMD is right for you. The purpose of the research study below is to demonstrate the molecular mechanisms and clinical applications of fasting in the FMD.

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Fasting: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

Fasting has been practiced for millennia, but only recently studies have shed light on its role in adaptive cellular responses that reduce oxidative damage and inflammation, optimize energy metabolism and bolster cellular protection. In lower eukaryotes, chronic fasting extends longevity in part by reprogramming metabolic and stress resistance pathways. In rodents intermittent or periodic fasting protects against diabetes, cancers, heart disease and neurodegeneration, while in humans it helps reduce obesity, hypertension, asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. Thus, fasting has the potential to delay aging and help prevent and treat diseases while minimizing the side effects caused by chronic dietary interventions.

Introduction

In humans, fasting is achieved by ingesting no or minimal amounts of food and caloric beverages for periods that typically range from 12 hours to three weeks. Many religious groups incorporate periods of fasting into their rituals including Muslims who fast from dawn until dusk during the month of Ramadan, and Christians, Jews, Buddhists and Hindus who traditionally fast on designated days of the week or calendar year. In many clinics, patients are now monitored by physicians while undergoing water only or very low calorie (less than 200 kcal/day) fasting periods lasting from 1 week or longer for weight management, and for disease prevention and treatment. Fasting is distinct from caloric restriction (CR) in which the daily caloric intake is reduced chronically by 20–40%, but meal frequency is maintained. Starvation is instead a chronic nutritional insufficiency that is commonly used as a substitute for the word fasting, particularly in lower eukaryotes, but that is also used to define extreme forms of fasting, which can result in degeneration and death. We now know that fasting results in ketogenesis, promotes potent changes in metabolic pathways and cellular processes such as stress resistance, lipolysis and autophagy, and can have medical applications that in some cases are as effective as those of approved drugs such as the dampening of seizures and seizure-associated brain damage and the amelioration of rheumatoid arthritis (Bruce-Keller et al., 1999; Hartman et al., 2012; Muller et al., 2001). As detailed in the remainder of this article, findings from well-controlled investigations in experimental animals, and emerging findings from human studies, indicate that different forms of fasting may provide effective strategies to reduce weight, delay aging, and optimize health. Here we review the fascinating and potent effects of different forms of fasting including intermittent fasting (IF, including alternate day fasting, or twice weekly fasting, for example) and periodic fasting (PF) lasting several days or longer every 2 or more weeks. We focus on fasting and minimize the discussion of CR, a topic reviewed elsewhere (Fontana et al., 2010; Masoro, 2005).

Lessons from Simple Organisms

The remarkable effects of the typical 20–40% CR on aging and diseases in mice and rats are often viewed as responses evolved in mammals to adapt to periods of limited availability of food (Fontana and Klein, 2007; Fontana et al., 2010; Masoro, 2005; Weindruch and Walford, 1988). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the protective effects of CR have likely evolved billions of years earlier in prokaryotes attempting to survive in an environment largely or completely devoid of energy sources while avoiding age-dependent damage that could compromise fitness. In fact, E. coli switched from a nutrient rich broth to a calorie-free medium survive 4 times longer, an effect reversed by the addition of various nutrients but not acetate, a carbon source associated with starvation conditions (Figure 1A) (Gonidakis et al., 2010). The effect of rich medium but not acetate in reducing longevity raises the possibility that a ketone body-like carbon source such as acetate may be part of an “alternate metabolic program” that evolved billions of years ago in microorganisms and that now allows mammals to survive during periods of food deprivation by obtaining much of the energy by catabolizing fatty acids and ketone bodies including acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate (Cahill, 2006).

In the yeast S. cerevisiae, switching cells from standard growth medium to water also causes a consistent 2-fold chronological lifespan extension as well as a major increase in the resistance to multiple stresses (Figure 1B) (Longo et al., 1997; Longo et al., 2012). The mechanisms of food deprivation-dependent lifespan extension involve the down-regulation of the amino acid response Tor-S6K (Sch9) pathway as well as of the glucose responsive Ras-adenylate cyclase-PKA pathway resulting in the activation of the serine/threonine kinase Rim15, a key enzyme coordinating the protective responses (Fontana et al., 2010). The inactivation of Tor-S6K, Ras-AC-PKA and activation of Rim15 result in increased transcription of genes including superoxide dismutases and heat shock proteins controlled by stress responsive transcription factors Msn2, Msn4 and Gis1, required for the majority of the protective effects caused by food deprivation (Wei et al., 2008). Notably, when switched to food deprivation conditions, both bacteria and yeast enter a hypometabolic mode that allows them to minimize the use of reserve carbon sources and can also accumulate high levels of the ketone body-like acetic acid, analogously to mammals.

Another major model organism in which fasting extends lifespan is the nematode C. elegans. Food deprivation conditions achieved by feeding worms little or no bacteria, lead to a major increase in lifespan (Figure 1C) (Kaeberlein et al., 2006; Lee et al., 2006), which requires AMPK as well as the stress resistance transcription factor DAF-16, similarly to the role of transcription factors Msn2/4 and Gis1 in yeast and FOXOs in flies and mammals (Greer et al., 2007). Intermittent food deprivation also extends lifespan in C. elegans by a mechanism involving the small GTPase RHEB-1 (Honjoh et al., 2009).

In flies, most studies indicate that intermittent food deprivation does not affect lifespan (Grandison et al., 2009). However, food reduction or food dilution have been consistently shown to extend Drosophila longevity (Piper and Partridge, 2007) suggesting that flies can benefit from dietary restriction but may be sensitive to even short starvation periods.

Together these results indicate that food deprivation can result in pro-longevity effects in a wide variety of organisms, but also underline that different organisms have different responses to fasting.

Adaptive Responses to Fasting in Mammals

In most mammals, the liver serves as the main reservoir of glucose, which is stored in the form of glycogen. In humans, depending upon their level of physical activity, 12 to 24 hours of fasting typically results in a 20% or greater decrease in serum glucose and depletion of the hepatic glycogen, accompanied by a switch to a metabolic mode in which non-hepatic glucose, fat-derived ketone bodies and free fatty acids are used as energy sources (Figures 2 and 3). Whereas most tissues can utilize fatty acids for energy, during prolonged periods of fasting, the brain relies on the ketone bodies β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate in addition to glucose for energy consumption (Figure 3B). Ketone bodies are produced in hepatocytes from the acetyl-CoA generated from β oxidation of fatty acids released into the bloodstream by adipocytes, and also by the conversion of ketogenic amino acids. After hepatic glycogen depletion, ketone bodies, fat-derived glycerol, and amino acids account for the gluconeogenesis-dependent generation of approximately 80 grams/day of glucose, which is mostly utilized by the brain. Depending on body weight and composition, the ketone bodies, free fatty acids and gluconeogenesis allow the majority of human beings to survive 30 or more days in the absence of any food and allow certain species, such as king penguins, to survive for over 5 months without food (Eichhorn et al., 2011) (Figure 3C). In humans, during prolonged fasting, the plasma levels of 3-β-hydroxybutyrate are about 5 times those of free fatty acids and acetoacetic acid (Figure 3A and 3B). The brain and other organs utilize ketone bodies in a process termed ketolysis, in which acetoacetic acid and 3-β- hydroxybutyrate are converted into acetoacetyl-CoA and then acetyl-CoA. These metabolic adaptations to fasting in mammals are reminiscent of those described earlier for E. coli and yeast, in which acetic acid accumulates in response to food deprivation (Gonidakis et al., 2010; Longo et al., 2012). In yeast, glucose, acetic acid and ethanol, but not glycerol which is also generated during fasting from the breakdown of fats, accelerate aging (Fabrizio et al., 2005; Wei et al., 2009). Thus, glycerol functions as a carbon source that does not activate the pro-aging nutrient signaling pathways but can be catabolized by cells. It will be important to understand how the different carbon sources generated during fasting affect cellular protection and aging. and to determine whether glycerol, specific ketone bodies or fatty acids can provide nourishment while reducing cellular aging in mammals, a possibility suggested by beneficial effects of a dietary ketone precursor in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (Kashiwaya et al., 2012). It will also be important to study, in various model organisms and humans, how high intake of specific types of fats (medium- vs. long- chain fatty acids, etc.) in substitution of carbohydrates and proteins influences gluconeogenesis and glucose levels as well as aging and diseases.

Fasting and the Brain

In mammals, severe CR/food deprivation results in a decrease in the size of most organs except the brain, and the testicles in male mice (Weindruch and Sohal, 1997). From an evolutionary perspective this implies that maintenance of a high level of cognitive function under conditions of food scarcity is of preeminent importance. Indeed, a highly conserved behavioral trait of all mammals is to be active when hungry and sedentary when satiated. In rodents, alternating days of normal feeding and fasting (IF) can enhance brain function as indicated by improvements in performance on behavioral tests of sensory and motor function (Singh et al., 2012) and learning and memory (Fontan-Lozano et al., 2007). The behavioral responses to IF are associated with increased synaptic plasticity and increased production of new neurons from neural stem cells (Lee et al., 2002).

Particularly interesting with regards to adaptive responses of the brain to limited food availability during human evolution is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The genes encoding BDNF and its receptor TrkB appeared in genomes relatively recently as they are present in vertebrates, but absent from worms, flies and lower species (Chao, 2000). The prominent roles of BDNF in the regulation of energy intake and expenditure in mammals is highlighted by the fact that the receptors for both BDNF and insulin are coupled to the highly conserved PI3 kinase – Akt, and MAP kinase signaling pathways (Figure 4). Studies of rats and mice have shown that running wheel exercise and IF increase BDNF expression in several regions of the brain, and that BDNF in part mediates exercise- and IF-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity, neurogenesis and neuronal resistance to injury and disease (see sections on fasting and neurodegeneration below). BDNF signaling in the brain may also mediate behavioral and metabolic responses to fasting and exercise including regulation of appetite, activity levels, peripheral glucose metabolism and autonomic control of the cardiovascular and gastrointestinal systems (Mattson, 2012a, b; Rothman et al., 2012).

Hunger is an adaptive response to food deprivation that involves sensory, cognitive and neuroendocrine changes which motivate and enable food seeking behaviors. It has been proposed that hunger-related neuronal networks, neuropeptides and hormones play pivotal roles in the beneficial effects of energy restriction on aging and disease susceptibility. As evidence, when mice in which the hypothalamic ‘hunger peptide’ NPY is selectively ablated are maintained on a CR diet, the ability of CR to suppress tumor growth is abolished (Shi et al., 2012). The latter study further showed that the ability of CR to elevate circulating adiponectin levels was also compromised in NPY-deficient mice, suggesting a key role for the central hunger response in peripheral endocrine adaptations to energy restriction. Adiponectin levels increase dramatically in response to fasting; and data suggest roles for adiponectin in the beneficial effects of IF on the cardiovascular system (Wan et al., 2010). The hunger response may also improve immune function during aging as ghrelin-deficient mice exhibit accelerated thymic involution during aging, and treatment of middle age mice with ghrelin increases thymocyte numbers and improves the functional diversity of peripheral T cell subsets (Peng et al., 2012). In addition to its actions on the hypothalamus and peripheral endocrine cells, fasting may increase neuronal network activity in brain regions involved in cognition, resulting in the production of BDNF, enhanced synaptic plasticity and improved stress tolerance (Rothman et al., 2012). Thus, hunger may be a critical factor involved in widespread central and peripheral adaptive responses to the challenge of food deprivation for extended time periods.

Fasting, Aging, and Disease in Rodent Models

Different Fasting Methods and Aging

The major differences between IF and PF in mice are the length and the frequency of the fast cycles. IF cycles usually last 24 hours and are one to a few days apart, whereas PF cycles last 2 or more days and are at least 1 week apart, which is necessary for mice to regain their normal weight. One difference in the molecular changes caused by different fasting regimes is the effect on a variety of growth factors and metabolic markers, with IF causing more frequent but less pronounced changes than PF. It will be important to determine how the frequency of specific changes such as the lowering of IGF-1 and glucose affect cellular protection, diseases and longevity. The most extensively investigated IF method in animal studies of aging has been alternate day fasting (food is withdrawn for 24 hours on alternate days, with water provided ad libitum) (Varady and Hellerstein, 2007). The magnitude of the effects of alternate day fasting on longevity in rodents depends upon the species and age at regimen initiation, and can range from a negative effect to as much as an 80% lifespan extension (Arum et al., 2009; Goodrick et al., 1990). IF every other day extended the lifespan of rats more than fasting every 3rd or 4th day (Carlson and Hoelzel, 1946). Fasting for 24 hours twice weekly throughout adult life resulted in a significant increase in lifespan of black-hooded rats (Kendrick, 1973). In rats, the combination of alternate day fasting and treadmill exercise resulted in greater maintenance of muscle mass than did IF or exercise alone (Sakamoto and Grunewald, 1987). Interestingly, when rats were maintained for 10 weeks on a PF diet in which they fasted 3 consecutive days each week, they were less prone to hypoglycemia during 2 hours of strenuous swimming exercise as a result of their accumulation of larger intramuscular stores of glycogen and triglycerides (Favier and Koubi, 1988). Several major physiological responses to fasting are similar to those caused by regular aerobic exercise including increased insulin sensitivity and cellular stress resistance, reduced resting blood pressure and heart rate, and increased heart rate variability as a result of increased parasympathetic tone (Figure 2) (Anson et al., 2003; Mager et al., 2006; Wan et al., 2003). Emerging findings suggest that exercise and IF retard aging and some age-related diseases by shared mechanisms involving improved cellular stress adaptation (Stranahan and Mattson, 2012). However, in two different mouse genetic backgrounds, IF did not extend mean lifespan and even reduced lifespan when initiated at 10 months (Goodrick et al., 1990). When initiated at 1.5 months, IF either increased longevity or had no effect (Figure 1D) (Goodrick et al., 1990). These results in rodents point to conserved effects of fasting on lifespan, but also to the need for a much better understanding of the type of fasting that can maximize its longevity effects and the mechanisms responsible for the detrimental effects that may be counterbalancing its anti-aging effects. For example, one possibility is that fasting may be consistently protective in young and middle aged laboratory rodents that are either gaining or maintaining a body weight, but may be detrimental in older animals that, similarly to humans, begin to lose weight prior to their death. Notably, whereas bacteria, yeast and humans can survive for several weeks or more without nutrients, most strains of mice are unable to survive more than 3 days without food. The age-dependent weight loss may make this sensitivity to long periods of fasting worse.

Fasting and Cancer

Fasting can have positive effects in cancer prevention and treatment. In mice, alternate day fasting caused a major reduction in the incidence of lymphomas (Descamps et al., 2005) and fasting for 1 day per week delayed spontaneous tumorigenesis in p53-deficient mice (Berrigan et al., 2002). However, the major decrease in glucose, insulin and IGF-1 caused by fasting, which is accompanied by cell death and/or atrophy in a wide range of tissues and organs including the liver and kidneys, is followed by a period of abnormally high cellular proliferation in these tissues driven in part by the replenishment of growth factors during refeeding. When combined with carcinogens during refeeding, this increased proliferative activity can actually increase carcinogenesis and/or pre-cancerous lesions in tissues including liver and colon (Tessitore et al., 1996). Although these studies underline the need for an in depth understanding of its mechanisms of action, fasting is expected to have cancer preventive effects as indicated by the studies above and by the findings that multiple cycles of periodic fasting can be as effective as toxic chemotherapy in the treatment of some cancers in mice (Lee et al., 2012).

In the treatment of cancer, fasting has been shown to have more consistent and positive effects. PF for 2–3 days was shown to protect mice from a variety of chemotherapy drugs, an effect called differential stress resistance (DSR) to reflect the inability of cancer cells to become protected based on the role of oncogenes in negatively regulating stress resistance, thus rendering cancer cells, by definition, unable to become protected in response to fasting conditions (Figure 5) (Raffaghello et al., 2008). PF also causes a major sensitization of various cancer cells to chemo-treatment, since it fosters an extreme environment in combination with the stress conditions caused by chemotherapy. In contrast to the protected state entered by normal cells during fasting, cancer cells are unable to adapt, a phenomenon called differential stress sensitization (DSS), based on the notion that most mutations are deleterious and that the many mutations accumulated in cancer cells promote growth under standard conditions but render them much less effective in adapting to extreme environments (Lee et al., 2012). In mouse models of metastatic tumors, combinations of fasting and chemotherapy that cause DSR and DSS, result in 20 to 60% cancer-free survival compared to the same levels of chemotherapy or fasting alone, which are not sufficient to cause any cancer-free survival (Lee et al., 2012; Shi et al., 2012). Thus, the idea that cancer could be treated with weeks of fasting alone, made popular decades ago, may be only partially true, at least for some type of cancers, but is expected to be ineffective for other types of cancers. The efficacy of long-term fasting alone (2 weeks or longer) in cancer treatment will need to be tested in carefully designed clinical trials in which side effects including malnourishment and possibly a weakened immune system and increased susceptibility to certain infections are carefully monitored. By contrast, animal data from multiple laboratories indicate that the combination of fasting cycles with chemotherapy is highly and consistently effective in enhancing chemotherapeutic index and has high translation potential. A number of ongoing trials should soon begin to determine the efficacy of fasting in enhancing cancer treatment in the clinic.

Fasting and Neurodegeneration

Compared to ad libitum-fed controls, rats and mice maintained on an IF diet exhibit less neuronal dysfunction and degeneration, and fewer clinical symptoms in models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD). These models include transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes that cause dominantly inherited AD (amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1) and frontotemporal lobe dementia (Tau) (Halagappa et al., 2007), PD (α-synuclein) (Griffioen et al., 2012) and HD (huntingtin) (Duan et al., 2003), as well as neurotoxin-based models pertinent to AD, PD and HD (Bruce-Keller et al., 1999; Duan and Mattson, 1999). Animals on an IF diet also fare better than ad libitum-fed controls after acute injury including severe epileptic seizures, stroke, and traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries (Arumugam et al., 2010; Bruce-Keller et al., 1999; Plunet et al., 2008).

Several interrelated cellular mechanisms contribute to the beneficial effects of IF on the nervous system including reduced accumulation of oxidatively damaged molecules, improved cellular bioenergetics, enhanced neurotrophic factor signaling, and reduced inflammation (Mattson, 2012a). The latter neuroprotective mechanisms are supported by studies showing that IF diets boost levels of antioxidant defenses, neurotrophic factors (BDNF and FGF2) and protein chaperones (HSP-70 and GRP-78), and reduce levels of pro- inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6) (Figure 4) (Arumugam et al., 2010). IF may also promote restoration of damaged nerve cell circuits by stimulating synapse formation and the production of new neurons from neural stem cells (neurogenesis) (Lee et al., 2002). Interestingly, while beneficial in models of most neurodegenerative conditions, there is evidence that fasting can hasten neurodegeneration in some models of inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, perhaps because the motor neurons affected in those models are unable to respond adaptively to the moderate stress imposed by fasting (Mattson et al., 2007; Pedersen and Mattson, 1999).

Fasting and the Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome (MS), defined as abdominal adiposity, combined with insulin resistance, elevated triglycerides and/or hypertension, greatly increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stroke and AD. Rats and mice maintained under the usual ad libitum feeding condition develop an MS-like phenotype as they age. MS can also be induced in younger animals by feeding them a diet high in fat and simple sugars (Martin et al., 2010). IF can prevent and reverse all aspects of the MS in rodents: abdominal fat, inflammation and blood pressure are reduced, insulin sensitivity is increased, and the functional capacities of the nervous, neuromuscular and cardiovascular systems are improved (Castello et al., 2010; Wan et al., 2003). Hyperglycemia is ameliorated by IF in rodent models of diabetes (Pedersen et al., 1999) and the heart is protected against ischemic injury in myocardial infarction models (Ahmet et al., 2005). A protective effect of fasting against ischemic renal and liver injury occurs rapidly, with 1 – 3 days of fasting improving functional outcome and reducing tissue injury and mortality (Mitchell et al., 2010). Six days on a diet missing just a single essential amino acid such as tryptophan can also elicit changes in metabolism and stress resistance, similar to those caused by fasting, which are dependent on the amino acid sensing kinase Gcn2 (Peng et al., 2012).

Multiple hormonal changes that typify MS in humans a re observed in rodents maintained on high fat and sugar diets including elevated levels of insulin and leptin and reduced levels of adiponectin and ghrelin. Elevated leptin levels are typically reflective of a pro- inflammatory state, whereas adiponectin and ghrelin can suppress inflammation and increase insulin sensitivity (Baatar et al., 2011; Yamauchi et al., 2001). Local inflammation in hypothalamic nuclei that control energy intake and expenditure may contribute to a sustained positive energy balance in MS (Milanski et al., 2012). Fasting results in a lowering of insulin and leptin levels and an elevation of adiponectin and ghrelin levels. By increasing insulin and leptin sensitivity, suppressing inflammation and stimulating autophagy, fasting reverses all the major abnormalities of the MS in rodents (Singh et al., 2009; Wan et al., 2010). Finally, in addition to its many effects on cells throughout the body and brain, IF may elicit changes in the gut microbiota that protect against MS (Tremaroli and Backhed, 2012). Naturally, the challenge of applying fasting-based interventions to treat MS in humans is a major one, as some obese individuals may have difficulties in following IF for long periods.

Dr Jimenez White Coat

The ProLon® fasting mimicking diet is a 5-day meal program consisting of scientifically developed and clinically tested, natural ingredients which “trick” the human body into a fasting mode. The FMD is low in carbohydrates as well as proteins and it’s high in fats. The ProLon® fasting mimicking diet promotes a variety of healthy benefits, including weight loss and decreased abdominal fat, all while preserving lead body mass, improved energy levels, softer and healthier looking skin, as well as overall health and wellness. The FMD can promote longevity.

Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Fasting, Aging, and Disease in Humans

Fasting and Factors Implicated in Aging

Clinical and epidemiological data are consistent wit h an ability of fasting to retard the aging process and associated diseases. Major factors implicated in aging whose generation are accelerated by gluttonous lifestyles and slowed by energy restriction in humans include: 1) oxidative damage to proteins, DNA and lipids; 2) inflammation; 3) accumulation of dysfunctional proteins and organelles; and 4) elevated glucose, insulin and IGF-I, although IGF-1decreases with aging and its severe deficiency can be associated with certain pathologies (Bishop et al., 2010; Fontana and Klein, 2007). Serum markers of oxidative damage and inflammation as well as clinical symptoms are reduced over a period of 2–4 weeks in asthma patients maintained on an alternate day fasting diet (Johnson et al., 2007). Similarly, when on a 2 days/week fasting diet overweight women at risk for breast cancer exhibited reduced oxidative stress and inflammation (Harvie et al., 2011) and elderly men exhibited reductions in body weight and body fat, and improved mood (Teng et al., 2011). Additional effects of fasting in human cells that can be considered as potentially ‘anti-aging’ are inhibition the mTOR pathway, stimulation of autophagy and ketogenesis (Harvie et al., 2011; Sengupta et al., 2010).

Among the major effects of fasting relevant to aging and diseases are changes in the levels of IGF-1, IGFBP1, glucose, and insulin. Fasting for 3 or more days causes a 30% or more decrease in circulating insulin and glucose, as well as rapid decline in the levels of insulin- like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), the major growth factor in mammals, which together with insulin is associated with accelerated aging and cancer (Fontana et al., 2010). In humans, five days of fasting causes an over 60% decrease in IGF-1and a 5-fold or higher increase in one of the principal IGF-1-inhibiting proteins: IGFBP1 (Thissen et al., 1994a). This effect of fasting on IGF-1is mostly due to protein restriction, and particularly to the restriction of essential amino acids, but is also supported by calorie restriction since the decrease in insulin levels during fasting promotes reduction in IGF-1(Thissen et al., 1994a). Notably, in humans, chronic calorie restriction does not lead to a decrease in IGF-1unless combined with protein restriction (Fontana et al., 2008).

IF can be achieved in with a minimal decrease in overall calorie intake if the refeeding period in which subjects overeat is considered. Thus, fasting cycles provide a much more feasible strategy to achieve the beneficial effects of CR, and possibly stronger effects, without the burden of chronic underfeeding and some of the potentially adverse effects associated with weight loss or very low BMIs. In fact, subjects who are moderately overweight (BMI of 25–30) in later life can have reduced overall mortality risk compared to subjects of normal weight (Flegal et al., 2013). Although these results may be affected by the presence of many existing or developing pathologies in the low weight control group, they underline the necessity to differentiate between young individuals and elderly individuals who may use CR or fasting to reduce weight or delay aging. Although extreme dietary interventions during old age may continue to protect from age-related diseases, they could have detrimental effects on the immune system and the ability to respond to certain infectious diseases, wounds and other challenges (Kristan, 2008; Reed et al., 1996). However, IF or PF designed to avoid weight loss and maximize nourishment have the potential to have beneficial effects on infectious diseases, wounds and other insults even in the very old. Nourishment of subjects can be achieved by complementing IF or PF with micro- and macro Studies to test the effect of IF or PF regimens on markers of aging, cancer, cognition and obesity are in progress (V. Longo and M. Mattson).

Fasting and Cancer

Fasting has the potential for applications in both cancer prevention and treatment. Although no human data are available on the effect of IF or PF in cancer prevention, their effect on reducing IGF-1, insulin and glucose levels, and increasing IGFBP1 and ketone body levels could generate a protective environment that reduces DNA damage and carcinogenesis, while at the same time creating hostile conditions for tumor and pre-cancerous cells (Figure 5). In fact, elevated circulating IGF-1 is associated with increased risk of developing certain cancers (Chan et al., 2000; Giovannucci et al., 2000) and individuals with severe IGF-1deficiency caused by growth hormone receptor deficiency, rarely develop cancer (Guevara-Aguirre et al., 2011; Shevah and Laron, 2007; Steuerman et al., 2011). Furthermore, the serum from these IGF-1deficient subjects protected human epithelial cells from oxidative stress-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, once their DNA became damaged, cells were more likely to undergo programmed cell death (Guevara-Aguirre et al., 2011). Thus, fasting may protect from cancer by reducing cellular and DNA damage but also by enhancing the death of pre-cancerous cells.

In a preliminary study of 10 subjects with a variety of malignancies, the combination of chemotherapy with fasting resulted in a decrease in a range of self-reported common side effects caused by chemotherapy compared to the same subjects receiving chemotherapy while on a standard diet (Safdie et al., 2009). The effect of fasting on chemotherapy toxicity and cancer progression is now being tested in clinical trials in both Europe and the US (0S-08-9, 0S-10-3).

Fasting and Neurodegeneration

Our current understanding of the impact of IF on the nervous system and cognitive functions is largely inferred from animal studies (see above). Interventional studies to determine the impact of fasting on brain function and neurodegenerative disease processes are lacking.

After 3–4 month, CR improved cognitive function (verbal memory) in overweight women (Kretsch et al., 1997) and in elderly subjects (Witte et al., 2009). Similarly, when subjects with mild cognitive impairment were maintained for 1 month on a low glycemic diet, they exhibited improved delayed visual memory, cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Aβ metabolism and brain bioenergetics (Bayer-Carter et al., 2011). Studies in which cognitive function, regional brain volumes, neural network activity, and biochemical analyses of cerebrospinal fluid are measured in human subjects before and during an extended period of IF should clarify the impact of IF on human brain structure and function.

Fasting, Inflammation and Hypertension

In humans, one of the best demonstrations of the beneficial effects of long-term fasting lasting one to 3 weeks is in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In agreement with the results in rodents, there is little doubt that during the period of fasting both inflammation and pain are reduced in RA patients (Muller et al., 2001). However, after the normal diet is resumed, inflammation returns unless the fasting period is followed by a vegetarian diet (Kjeldsen-Kragh et al., 1991), a combination therapy that has beneficial effects lasting for two years or longer (Kjeldsen-Kragh et al., 1994). The validity of this approach is supported by four differently controlled studies, including two randomized trials (Muller et al., 2001). Therefore, fasting combined with a vegetarian diet and possibly with other modified diets provides beneficial effects in the treatment of RA. Alternate day IF also resulted in significant reductions in serum TNFα and ceramides in asthma patients during a 2 month period (Johnson et al., 2007). The latter study further showed that markers of oxidative stress often associated with inflammation (protein and lipid oxidation) were significantly reduced in response to IF. Thus, for many patients able and willing to endure long-term fasting and to permanently modify their diet, fasting cycles would have the potential to not only augment but also replace existing medical treatments.

Water only and other forms of long-term fasting have also been documented to have potent effects on hypertension. An average of 13 days of water only fasting resulted in the achievement of a systolic blood pressure (BP) below 120 in 82% of subjects with borderline hypertension with a mean 20 mm Hg reduction in BP (Goldhamer et al., 2002). BP remained significantly lower compared to baseline even after subjects resumed the normal diet for an average of 6 days (Goldhamer et al., 2002). A small pilot study of patients with hypertension (140 mm and above systolic BP) also showed that 10–11 days of fasting caused a 37–60 mm decrease in systolic BP (Goldhamer et al., 2001). These preliminary studies are promising but underscore the need for larger controlled and randomized clinical studies that focus on periodic fasting strategies that are feasible for a larger portion of the population.

For both hypertension and RA it will be important to develop PF mimicking diets that are as effective as the fasting regimens described above but that are also tolerable by the great majority of patients.

Fasting and the Metabolic Syndrome

Periodic fasting can reverse multiple features of the metabolic syndrome in humans: it enhances insulin sensitivity, stimulates lipolysis and reduces blood pressure. Body fat and blood pressure were reduced and glucose metabolism improved in obese subjects in response to an alternate day modified fast (Klempel et al., 2013; Varady et al., 2009). Overweight subjects maintained for 6 months on a twice weekly IF diet in which they consumed only 500–600 calories on the fasting days, lost abdominal fat, displayed improved insulin sensitivity and reduced blood pressure (Harvie et al., 2011). Three weeks of alternate day fasting resulted in reductions in body fat and insulin levels in normal weight men and women (Heilbronn et al., 2005) and Ramadan fasting (2 meals/day separated by approximately 12 hours) in subjects with MS resulted in decreased daily energy intake, decreased plasma glucose levels and increased insulin sensitivity (Shariatpanahi et al., 2008). Subjects undergoing coronary angiography who reported that they fasted regularly exhibited a lower prevalence of diabetes compared to non-fasters (Horne et al., 2012). Anti- metabolic syndrome effects of IF were also observed in healthy young men (BMI of 25) after 15 days of alternate day fasting: their whole-body glucose uptake rates increased significantly, levels of plasma ketone bodies and adiponectin were elevated, all of which occurred without a significant decrease in body weight (Halberg et al., 2005). The latter findings are similar to data from animal studies showing that IF can improve glucose metabolism even with little or no weight change (Anson et al., 2003). It will be important to determine if longer fasting periods which promote a robust switch to a fat breakdown and ketone body-based metabolism, can cause longer lasting and more potent effects.

Conclusions and Recommendations

Based on the existing evidence from animal and human studies described, we conclude that there is great potential for lifestyles that incorporate periodic fasting during adult life to promote optimal health and reduce the risk of many chronic diseases, particularly for those who are overweight and sedentary. Animal studies have documented robust and replicable effects of fasting on health indicators including greater insulin sensitivity, and reduced levels of blood pressure, body fat, IGF-I, insulin, glucose, atherogenic lipids and inflammation. Fasting regimens can ameliorate disease processes and improve functional outcome in animal models of disorders that include myocardial infarction, diabetes, stroke, AD and PD. One general mechanism of action of fasting is that it triggers adaptive cellular stress responses, which result in an enhanced ability to cope with more severe stress and counteract disease processes. In addition, by protecting cells from DNA damage, suppressing cell growth and enhancing apoptosis of damaged cells, fasting could retard and/ or prevent the formation and growth of cancers.

However, studies of fasting regimens have not been performed in children, the very old and underweight individuals, and it is possible that IF and PF would be harmful to these populations. Fasting periods lasting longer than 24 hours and particularly those lasting 3 or more days should be done under the supervision of a physician and preferably in a clinic. IF- and PF-based approaches towards combating the current epidemics of overweight, diabetes and related diseases should be pursued in human research studies and medical treatment plans. Several variations of potential ‘fasting prescriptions’ that have been adopted for overweight subjects revolve around the common theme of abstaining from food and caloric beverages for at least 12 – 24 hours on one or more days each week or month, depending on the length, combined with regular exercise. For those who are overweight, physicians could ask their patients to choose a fasting-based intervention that they believe they could comply with based upon their daily and weekly schedules. Examples include the ‘5:2’ IF diet (Harvie et al., 2011), the alternate day modified fasting diet (Johnson et al., 2007; Varady et al., 2009), a 4–5 day fast or low calorie but high nourishment fasting mimicking diets once every 1–3 months followed by the skipping of one major meal every day if needed (V. Longo, clinical trial in progress). One of the concerns with unbalanced alternating diets such as those in which low calorie intake is only observed for 2 days a week are the potential effects on circadian rhythm and the endocrine and gastrointestinal systems, which are known to be influenced by eating habits. During the first 4 – 6 weeks of implementation of the fasting regimen, a physician or registered dietitian should be in regular contact with the patient to monitor their progress and to provide advice and supervision.

Fasting regimens could also be tailored for specific diseases as stand-alone or adjunct therapies. Results of initial trials of IF (fasting 2 days per week or every other day) in human subjects suggest that there is a critical transition period of 3 – 6 weeks during which time the brain and body adapt to the new eating pattern and mood is enhanced (Harvie et al., 2011; Johnson et al., 2007). Though speculative, it is likely that during the latter transition period brain neurochemistry changes so that the ‘addiction’ to regular consumption of food throughout the day is overcome. Notably, the various fasting approaches are likely to have limited efficacy particularly on aging and conditions other than obesity unless combined with diets such as the moderate calorie intake and mostly plant-based Mediterranean or Okinawa low protein diets (0.8 g protein/Kg of body weight), consistently associated with health and longevity.

In the future, it will be important to combine epidemiological data, studies of long-lived populations and their diets, results from model organisms connecting specific dietary components to pro-aging and pro-disease factors, with data from studies on fasting regimens in humans, to design large clinical studies that integrate fasting with diets recognized as protective and enjoyable. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which fasting affects various cell types and organ systems should lead to the development of novel prophylactic and therapeutic interventions for a wide range of disorders.

Take Home Message

The fasting mimicking diet provides the same benefits of traditional fasting by restricting your calorie intake for five days out of the month instead of completely eliminating all food for several days or even weeks. The ProLon® fasting mimicking diet offers a 5-day meal program which has been individually packed and labeled in precise quantities and combinations for each day. Although the research study above has demonstrated the health benefits of fasting, please make sure to talk to a healthcare professional before starting the ProLon® fasting mimicking diet, 5-day meal program to find out if the FMD, or any other diet, is right for you.

The published, final edited form of the research study referenced above was made available in the NIH Public Access Author Manuscript on PMC February 4, 2015. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic, spinal health issues, and functional medicine topics. To further discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

Referenced from: Nih.gov

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Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. Your spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.

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ProLon® Fasting Mimicking Diet Benefits

ProLon® Fasting Mimicking Diet Benefits

Fasting offers numerous health benefits, from increasing insulin sensitivity and promoting weight loss to enhancing the immune system. Although we all want the benefits of fasting, many of us can’t embrace the idea of not eating for extended periods of time. However, what if you could achieve all the healthy advantages of a fast without having to skip meals?

The fasting mimicking diet, sometimes abbreviated as FMD, is a nutritional regimen. It consists of eating natural ingredients for five days which “tricks” the human body into a fasting mode. Research studies have demonstrated the fasting mimicking diet’s ability to improve overall health and wellness. Below, we will discuss the benefits of the fasting mimicking diet.

How Does the Fasting Mimicking Diet Work?

By restricting the food you eat, the fasting mimicking diet can provide similar health benefits as traditional fasting like reduced inflammation and fat burning. The difference, however, is that instead of not eating any food for several days or weeks, you’re simply limiting your calorie intake for five days. You can do the FMD once a month or every other month to promote well-being.

The ProLon® fasting mimicking diet, 5-day meal program offers individually packed and labeled foods for each day in precise quantities and combinations. The meal program consists of ready-to-eat or easy-to-prepare, plant-based foods, such as bars, soups, snacks, supplements, a drink concentrate, and teas. The products are scientifically formulated and great tasting.

FMD Macronutrient Ratios

First, you will restrict your calories to 1,100 calories on day one of the FMD. Then, you will restrict your calories to 800 calories on the other four days. What you eat and in what ratios you eat those foods is fundamental in the fasting mimicking diet. Healthcare professionals will recommend different ratios of macronutrients, the three basic components of every diet.

The most common recommendation is to eat 1,100 calories following a macronutrient ratio of 34 percent carbohydrates, 10 percent proteins, and 56 percent fats on day one. For the remaining four days, the most common recommendation is to eat 800 calories following a macronutrient ratio of 47 percent carbohydrates, 9 percent proteins, and 44 percent fats.

Other healthcare professionals recommend a macronutrient ratio with as much as 80 percent of calories coming from fat, and 10 percent from carbohydrates and proteins, respectively. According to Dr. Valter Longo, creator of the FMD, “the fasting mimicking diet allows the natural process of starvation, including autophagy, and stem cell regeneration, to occur without interruption.

The Science Behind the FMD

Research studies have demonstrated that limiting calorie intake provides many benefits for the lifespan of animals. However, what does the science say about the benefits of the fasting mimicking diet on humans? A recent research study evaluated the effects of the FMD in people and found some promising outcome measures. The research study was conducted on 100 healthy participants.

Half of the participants followed the ProLon® fasting mimicking diet, 5-day meal program every month and the other half of the participants followed a regular diet. After three months, the FMD group experienced weight loss, including visceral fat reduction, as well as decreased blood glucose, blood pressure, and markers of inflammation. The FMD group also experienced a drop in insulin-like growth factor 1, more frequently known as 1GF-1, which is considered to be a biomarker for cancer development.

Dr Jimenez White Coat
The ProLon® fasting mimicking diet, 5-day meal program provides numerous health benefits while providing balanced nourishment. The FMD can promote weight loss as well as maintain healthy levels of blood glucose, BP, cholesterol, and triglycerides, C-reactive proteins, stem cells, and insulin-like growth factor 1 or IGF-1. Following the FMD alongside healthy lifestyle modifications can help improve overall health and wellness. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Other Fasting Mimicking Diet Benefits

The FMD has been demonstrated to give you protective, regenerative, and rejuvenating advantages while continuing to provide you with the balanced nourishment you need. Below, we will discuss several other health benefits of the fasting mimicking diet.

Decreases Cholesterol

The same research study mentioned above also demonstrated that after three months, the FMD group experienced decreased levels of total and bad LDL cholesterol. When we have increased levels of cholesterol in our blood, it can cause plaque to build up in our arteries, causing the hardening, and the narrowing of the arteries. This may lead to a heart attack and coronary heart disease. If you combine the FMD with lifestyle modifications, you can lower and maintain healthy cholesterol levels and keep your heart healthy.

Reduces Inflammation

We already mentioned that the FMD research study demonstrated it could decrease inflammation. However, we should first discuss what inflammation is and what it can do to the human body. Inflammation is one of the human body’s defense mechanisms. Your inflammation is triggered by your immune system to protect you from foreign invaders that could cause infection, illness, or injury.

By way of instance, let’s imagine you get a splinter in your finger. Your finger will become red and inflamed almost immediately. Your body is utilizing inflammation to protect itself from this foreign object. When you get a cut or an insect bite, the same holds true. However, how does inflammation affect our well-being? Chronic inflammation can lead to many chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and cancer. The FMD has the potential to reduce the possibility of developing chronic diseases.

Improves Brain Health

The fasting mimicking diet can also help improve our brain health. In a 2015 animal research study, the FMD improved cognition and promoted the regeneration of neurons in the brains of mice. Additionally, it decreased the markers of aging in the subjects.

Can Help Reverse Diabetes

The FMD can positively affect insulin production. In another animal research study, blood glucose levels were preserved and more insulin-producing beta cells were produced in mice. The Science Translational Medicine research study also demonstrated that the participants following the FMD experienced a reduction in glucose levels. Although further evidence is required, there are strong indications that healthy lifestyle modifications can help control and even reverse diabetes.

How to Start the Fasting Mimicking Diet

I encourage you to work with your healthcare professional if you’re interested in the FMD. You will also need advice and guidance from a qualified healthcare professional to help you decide on your proper macronutrient ratios. In summary, you should be eating a diet full of plant-rich whole foods, with an emphasis on nuts and olives. You could also eat soups and broths as well as herbal teas.

Make sure you also avoid the consumption of alcohol and carbonated drinks. Instead, you can drink two cups of black tea or coffee. Furthermore, you shouldn’t exercise vigorously during those five days. Consider taking a gentle walk around the block.

Research studies have demonstrated promising results with the fasting mimicking diet. However, the FMD may not be for everyone. Pregnant women and older adults shouldn’t try the FMD. If you’d like to experience the health benefits of the FMD yourself, talk with your doctor and/or a nutritionist. Doing more than one cycle every month could ultimately affect your overall health and wellness.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues as well as functional medicine topics and discussions. To further discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. Your spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.  

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

XYMOGEN’s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

Proudly, Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link.*XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

* All the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

***

Basics Of The ProLon® Fasting Mimicking Diet

Basics Of The ProLon® Fasting Mimicking Diet

The fasting mimicking diet is an alternative to fasting. However, it can have several benefits for your overall health and wellness. We will discuss everything you need to know about the regimen. The article below describes how to do it, its benefits, and how it’s different from normal fasting. The benefits of the fast mimicking diet will have you wanting to try it for yourself.

What is the Fasting Mimicking Diet?

The fasting mimicking diet is a type of modified fasting. The regimen produces the same benefits of fasting by eating small amounts of food. The fast mimicking diet generally lasts about five days and it includes a healthy protocol of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

Calories are also maintained at approximately 40 percent of the average calorie intake. This permits the human body to remain nourished without the stress of normal fasting. Calorie restriction can cause health issues, however, the fast mimicking diet is safe and effective. Below, we will discuss just how much the fast mimicking diet differs from traditional fasting.

Traditional Fasting Vs Fast Mimicking Diet

The fasting mimicking diet is always compared to intermittent fasting. There are many myths about these types of modified fasts. Some claim that our muscles waste away while others claim that they change our metabolism, and that it’s downright unhealthy.

The health issues discussed above may be true for a person who’s actually restricting their calorie intake. Some types of fasting may cause metabolic damage which may not be recommended for people with underlying health conditions. However, the fast mimicking diet gives you all the advantages of fasting without the side effects. Below are the benefits of the fast mimicking diet.

Benefits of the Fast Mimicking Diet

The benefits of the fast mimicking diet are essentially the same as those of regular fasting. The benefits are listed below.

Benefits of the Fasting Mimicking Diet | El Paso, TX Chiropractor

The fast mimicking diet “tricks” the human body into feeling as though it’s fasting. Now that we have discussed what this alternate form of fasting is and why it is worth doing, the following advice will demonstrate how to do the diet itself.

How to do the Fast Mimicking Diet

Research studies have found that the best results for the fasting mimicking diet occur in about five days or when your glucose ketone index drops below 1.0. Doing this regimen anywhere between 3 to 7 days is also beneficial. The regimen should also be repeated every month to fully experience its benefits, unless otherwise instructed by a healthcare professional.

If you’re interested in monitoring your fasting outcomes, you should consider quantifying specific biomarkers. This could be measured through lab tests before and after following the fasting mimicking diet. Measuring blood glucose, ketones, and weight changes every day can also be helpful to determine your biomarkers. You might also want to set up your environment by:

  • Telling friends and family about what you are doing and asking them for their support.
  • Eliminating any snack foods at home or work that might interrupt your regimen.
  • Giving yourself more time to sleep, as you will probably be more exhausted than usual.
  • Planning for exercise and physical activity every day. But keep away from intense workouts during this time.

Now that we discussed how you can do the diet, let’s discuss the basics of the fast mimicking diet.

Dr Jimenez White Coat
The fasting mimicking diet provides the same great benefits of fasting while still providing your body with some nourishment. If you are following this regimen, make sure that you maintain a low-calorie intake and utilize appropriate supplements to achieve ketosis without experiencing health issues. Set up your environment for the diet. And if you decide to blend the ketogenic diet with this alternate form of fasting to get into ketosis faster, you can achieve the maximum advantages out of the two regimens. Be sure to consult a healthcare professional before following the fasting mimicking diet. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

Fasting Mimicking Diet Basics

Some people today might eat a slightly higher amount of calories the first day as they ease into the fasting mimicking diet. They might then decrease their total caloric intake. You also want to make sure you eat smaller amounts of foods which are easy to digest.

ProLon® offers a pre-packaged box which contains all five days’ worth of meals for you to do the diet. The meals are all plant-based. One day, by way of instance, offers tea and a nut bar for breakfast, a small portion of vegetable soup and a few kale crackers for lunch, several olives in the afternoon, and finally another small portion of vegetable soup for dinner.

You can also do the fasting mimicking diet without the need for a pre-packaged box like ProLon®. Simply follow the right proportions and plan out how you will space them out every day. Macros for the fast mimicking diet are 34 percent carbohydrates, 10 percent protein, and 56 percent fat for the very first day and 47 percent carbohydrates, 9 percent protein, and 44 percent fat to the rest days.

A cup of black tea and coffee every day are generally allowed. Just make sure they don’t contain any added sugars or oils. Remember that people with health issues should consult a healthcare professional prior to doing the fast mimicking diet in your own home.

Foods

Dr. Anthony Gusting followed a four-day ketogenic fasting mimicking diet. Every day, he consumed different amounts of bone broth, coconut milk, coconut oil, BCAAs, and exogenous ketones. Avocados and grass-fed butter can also be included in the fast mimicking diet. This is a great way to combine the ketogenic diet with the fasting mimicking diet to benefit from the two regimens.

Supplements

Taking nutritional supplements can also make the fasting mimicking diet easier by providing enough nutrition. These may include:

  • Electrolytes like magnesium and salt to replenish any lost during water loss
  • Grass-fed liver tablets to provide micronutrient support
  • Branch chain amino acids, or BCAAs, to help prevent loss of lean tissue
  • Greens powder to provide micronutrients
  • Algal oil or cod liver oil for omega-3s

You may also take exogenous ketones to achieve ketosis through the keto diet. The fast mimicking diet can also help you achieve ketosis before following a ketogenic diet. Below, we will discuss how the fast mimicking diet promotes ketosis.

Ketosis and the Fast Mimicking Diet

The fast mimicking diet is an excellent way to prepare you for the ketogenic diet. This is because it allows you to get into ketosis. Additionally, eating keto foods makes it possible to remain in ketosis throughout the regimen. To follow a ketogenic fasting mimicking diet you must maintain your macros over the suitable range of 5 to 10 percent of carbohydrates, 20 to 25percent of proteins, and 70 to 80 percent of fats. If you’re unsure about whether you’re properly maintaining your macros, always choose something with more fat.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues as well as functional medicine topics and discussions. To further discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

Green Call Now Button H .png

Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. The spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.  

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

XYMOGEN’s Exclusive Professional Formulas are available through select licensed health care professionals. The internet sale and discounting of XYMOGEN formulas are strictly prohibited.

Proudly, Dr. Alexander Jimenez makes XYMOGEN formulas available only to patients under our care.

Please call our office in order for us to assign a doctor consultation for immediate access.

If you are a patient of Injury Medical & Chiropractic Clinic, you may inquire about XYMOGEN by calling 915-850-0900.

xymogen el paso, tx

For your convenience and review of the XYMOGEN products please review the following link.*XYMOGEN-Catalog-Download

* All the above XYMOGEN policies remain strictly in force.

***

The ProLon® “Fasting Mimicking Diet™”?  | El Paso, TX.

The ProLon® “Fasting Mimicking Diet™”? | El Paso, TX.

El Paso, Tx. Chiropractor, Dr. Alex Jimenez presents the “Fasting Mimicking Diet™” (FMD™) by ProLon®. He introduces how the plan works, what it includes, and the benefits.

This 5-day meal program provides nutrients in precise quantities and combinations that nourish the body, but the body does not recognize it as food and mimics a fast. This diet is the secret to fasting!

Research has shown certain types of diets that can mimic fasting, which enables the body to experience the health effects of a fast safely.

Fast Mimicking diet, what does it mean?

A Fasting Mimicking and Enhancing™ Diet (FMED™) is a high nutrition, low protein, low carbohydrate meal plan, that benefits aging, poor health, inflammation and maintaining optimal health.

fast mimicking diet el paso tx

What does plan consist of?

  • The ProLon® plan is followed 5-days each month.
  • Suggested you follow a healthy diet for remaining 25 days.
  • Provides natural, healthy ingredients to nourish body while body believes it’s fasting.
  • Meal is low in carbohydrates & proteins
  • Contains healthy fatty acids
  • Plant-based soups
  • Bars
  • Crackers
  • Olives
  • Drinks
  • Supplements

How Diet Is Taken?

  • The diet should be taken for 5 consecutive days
  • Patient transitions one day then resumes normal diet gradually.
  • Specific combination of food provided for each day: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and Snacks.
  • Missed meal can be made up any time same day.
  • Diet should be taken as recommended by healthcare professional.

After Completing the Diet?

  • 6th-day diet ends, patient should avoid binge eating and resume normal diet gradually.
  • Should start with liquid foods:
  • Soups and fruit juices
  • Followed by light meals:
  • Rice, pasta and small portions of meat, fish
fast mimicking diet el paso tx

Body Performance Enhancement:

  • Allows body to trigger set of protection measures
  • Greater focus
  • Clarity
  • Energy
  • Leaner body
  • Decrease excess body fat
  • Preserve lean muscle mass
  • Fastest way to lose fat (belly fat)
  • Enhances cellular function
  • Promote stem cell-based renewal (cleans up aging & damaged cells)
  • Metabolic health
  • Maintain healthy levels:
  • Blood glucose
  • Cholesterol
  • Blood pressure
  • Results in 5 days
fast mimicking diet el paso tx

Valter Longo, Ph.D.

fast mimicking diet el paso tx

Inventor: Fasting Mimicking Diet

Director of the Longevity Institute at the University of Southern California and The Program on Longevity and Cancer at IFOM in Milan designed the FMD.

  • He is considered the global leader in nutrition and aging.
  • His research team took on the journey to uncover an intervention that slows/reverses biological aging and delays the onset of age-related diseases.
  • Because it is risky nowadays to fast on water only, doctor Longo developed a natural plant-based meal program that imitates fasting while still feeding the body.

The ProLon Fasting Mimicking Formulation is only healthcare technology to be granted a patent for promoting tissue/organ regeneration, Longevity, and Healthspan by the USPTO.

Medicina Funcional Parte 3: Nutrición

Medicina Funcional Parte 3: Nutrición

El Doctor de Medicina Funcional Explica la Nutrición

Cada reacción química que ocurre en el cuerpo humano requiere de enzimas y cada uno de estos procesos necesita una coenzima. Pero ¿qué son las coenzimas? Son vitaminas y minerales. Aproximadamente 37 billones, billones de reacciones químicas ocurren en el cuerpo humano cada segundo.

Es por eso que una nutrición adecuada y una dieta balanceada rica en alimentos integrales con vitaminas y minerales es fundamental para la salud y el bienestar general. La mayoría de las personas en los Estados Unidos son deficientes en vitaminas y / o minerales. Pero, ¿cómo sabes si eres parte del 90 por ciento de las personas con suficientes deficiencias para desarrollar una enfermedad? Discutiremos las pruebas que puede realizar para averiguar si tiene deficiencia de vitaminas y / o minerales y qué puede hacer al respecto.

¿Que es la Nutrición?

Hola, bienvenidos a la tercera parte de “Cómo Tomar el Control de su Salud”. Hoy, discutiremos uno de los temas mas divertidos de la medicina funcional: la nutrición. Desafortunadamente, la nutrición es una de las conversaciones más importantes que muchos doctores no están dispuestos a tener con sus pacientes. El doctor promedio aprende sobre las enfermedades y la desnutrición en lugar de aprender cómo usar la nutrición como tratamiento o incluso cómo usar terapias nutricionales para lograr salud y bienestar óptimos.

Personalmente creo que la comida puede ser utilizada como una forma de medicina. Que debería ser la base de la práctica médica, no una idea tardía en la medicina. No hay mejor tratamiento que la nutrición adecuada. Aproximadamente el 90 por ciento de las personas en los Estados Unidos no obtienen los nutrientes esenciales que necesitan para las funciones corporales saludables. Y más que eso probablemente no esté obteniendo suficientes nutrientes para prevenir enfermedades asociadas con deficiencias nutricionales. Sin embargo, ¿qué se necesita para lograr un bienestar óptimo? Más del 98 por ciento de los estadounidenses son deficientes en omega-3, 80 por ciento en vitamina D, 50 por ciento en magnesio y 10 por ciento en vitamina C. Las deficiencias de nutrientes también pueden seguir causando problemas de salud durante años.

Las enfermedades agudas, como el raquitismo, el escorbuto, el beriberi o la anemia por deficiencia de hierro, suelen ser los problemas de salud más comentados asociados con las deficiencias de nutrientes. Sin embargo, también se conocen como enfermedades de deficiencia de latencia prolongada. Entonces, ¿cuánta vitamina D necesitamos para no tener raquitismo? No mucho, solo 30 unidades realmente. ¿Y cuánto necesitamos para no tener osteoporosis? Tal vez unas 3,000 a 4,000 unidades por día. Ahora, ¿cuánto folato necesitamos para no tener anemia? También no mucho. Pero, ¿cuánto necesitamos para prevenir las enfermedades cardíacas, el cáncer y la demencia? Definitivamente se necesitan muchas más unidades por día.

Cada reacción química que ocurre en el cuerpo humano requiere enzimas y cada uno de estos procesos necesita una coenzima. Pero ¿qué son las coenzimas? Son vitaminas y minerales. Aproximadamente 37 billones, billones de reacciones químicas ocurren en el cuerpo humano cada segundo.

Es por eso que una nutrición adecuada y una dieta balanceada rica en alimentos integrales con vitaminas y minerales es fundamental para la salud y el bienestar general. La mayoría de las personas en los Estados Unidos son deficientes en vitaminas y / o minerales. Pero, ¿cómo sabes si eres parte del 90 por ciento de las personas con suficientes deficiencias para desarrollar una enfermedad? Sólo hay varios nutrientes que generalmente se analizan. Y para la mayoría de estos, los doctores no son conscientes de cuáles deberían ser los valores óptimos, lo que puede dificultar mucho la corrección de la deficiencia de nutrientes.

Tomando el Control de su Nutrición

Uno de los nutrientes más fundamentales que se necesita medir es la vitamina D. Aunque se le conoce como una vitamina, en realidad es más como una hormona y se produce por parte del colesterol. Esta es otra razón por la cual el colesterol es esencial. Aproximadamente el 80 por ciento de la población tiene una deficiencia de vitamina D. A menos que esté al sol 20 minutos todos los días entre las 10:00 am y las 2:00 pm, es posible que deba tomar suplementos de vitamina D. Para complementar adecuadamente, necesitamos saber desde qué nivel está comenzando desde un principio. A modo de ejemplo, los niveles óptimos de vitamina D deben de ser entre 50 y 80 nanogramos por mililitro de sangre. La cantidad recomendada de vitamina D que podemos complementar es de aproximadamente 2,000 a 4,000 unidades.

Si tiene niveles más bajos de vitamina D o si tiene problemas genéticos, es posible que necesite un suplemento con hasta 10,000 unidades de vitamina D. Por eso es fundamental trabajar con un doctor o especialista de medicina funcional que pueda medir y evaluar sus niveles de nutrients, así como ayudarles a optimizarlos. La mayoría de los suplementos contienen aproximadamente 400 unidades, que es 10 veces menos que la cantidad que la mayoría de nosotros necesitamos. Los niveles comunes son generalmente un poco más de 20. Esto es demasiado bajo. En un estudio de investigación, las mujeres con niveles de vitamina D entre 45 y 60 experimentaron una reducción en los partos prematuros hasta de un 60 por ciento. La vitamina D también es esencial para ayudar a desarrollar huesos y músculos fuertes, mejorar la función del sistema inmunológico, prevenir el cáncer asi como para ayudarlo a vivir más tiempo. Es increíble.

Otra medida o prueba realizada por la mayoría de los doctores, pero que no siempre se interpreta correctamente, se conoce como MCV o volumen corpuscular medio. La medida de MCV evalúa el tamaño de sus glóbulos rojos en una prueba llamada CBC, o hemograma completo, que es uno de los paneles de sangre más comunes solicitados por profesionales de la salud. Por lo tanto, si usted es deficiente en nutrientes, sus células pueden hacerse más pequeñas o más grandes. A modo de ejemplo, si sus células son demasiado grandes, podrían ser signos de una deficiencia de folato o vitamina B12.

Las vitaminas B son esenciales en numerosas reacciones químicas en el cuerpo humano. Nos ayudan a producir energía y nos ayudan a regular la expresión genética para crear proteínas que aseguran nuestra salud y bienestar en general. Si nuestras vitaminas B estan demasiado bajas, eventualmente podríamos desarrollar una deficiencia de hierro, anemia o incluso podría causar un trastorno genético.

Los niveles óptimos de vitaminas B deben estar entre 80 y 90. Los suplementos vitamínicos del complejo B pueden ayudar a optimizar fácilmente los niveles de vitaminas B. Pero, ¿por qué alguien sería deficiente en vitaminas B? ¿Acaso su dieta no les proporciona suficientes nutrientes? ¿Son veganos? ¿Están tomando medicamentos que evitan la absorción de la vitamina B12? Además, las vitaminas B se agotan en momentos de gran estrés que, como quiropráctico, puedo decir que le sucede con frecuencia a la mayoría de la población en los Estados Unidos.

El MCV no es la única medida o prueba que evalúa los niveles de vitaminas B de un paciente. La homocisteína es un marcador alternativo que analizaremos en futuros artículos que demuestran los niveles de B6, folato y B12. Sin embargo, tanto el MCV como la medida o prueba de homocisteína solo demuestran que uno o más de estos nutrientes pueden ser deficientes. No necesariamente nos dice cuál. Por lo tanto, se pueden requerir algunas evaluaciones adicionales de seguimiento.

La medida o prueba del MMA, o ácido metilmalónico, también muestra los niveles de vitamina B12. La vitamina B12 es esencial para muchos procesos en el cuerpo humano, incluida la producción de energía, la expresión de genes, la metilación, la función nerviosa y el estado de ánimo, entre muchos otros procesos. Los veganos tienen una mayor probabilidad de desarrollar una deficiencia de B12 porque este solo se encuentra en los productos animales. El folato es otra vitamina B fundamental. Se puede determinar directamente en la sangre, pero la homocisteína es un marcador más preciso para los niveles de folato.

En esta sección, también hablaremos sobre genética porque existe una medida o prueba que puede demostrar mucho más con respecto al estado de sus vitaminas B y su capacidad para utilizarlas. Nuestros genes son capaces de producir proteínas. Tenemos aproximadamente 20,000 genes que están diseñados para crear proteínas. Y un tercio de todas las proteínas que producen son para nuestras enzimas. Las enzimas convierten los nutrientes en otros nutrientes. Estas enzimas también dependen en gran cantidad de ciertos nutrientes específicos. Uno de los genes más fundamentales que pueden verse afectados es conocido como MTHFR o metilentetrahidrofolato reductasa. Pero puedes llamarlo MTHFR.

El MTHFR es esencial porque ayuda a regular la metilación, la homocisteína y el folato, que son vitales para nuestra salud y bienestar general. Cuando se tienen niveles elevados de homocisteína, se debe verificar su estado de metilación buscando el gen MTHFR a través de un simple análisis de sangre.

La metilación es un proceso bioquímico clave que es fundamental para la función adecuada de la mayoría de los sistemas del cuerpo humano. Se dispara miles de millones de veces cada segundo. Y ayuda a controlar la homocisteína, una sustancia que puede dañar los vasos sanguíneos y se ha asociado con la demencia, asi como enfermedades cardíacas y cáncer, entre otros problemas de salud. La metilación también ayuda a reparar su ADN de manera regular, ya que ayuda a reciclar las moléculas necesarias para la desintoxicación o para eliminar las toxinas. También ayuda a controlar su estado de ánimo y ayuda a controlar la inflamación. La metilación es vital.

Pero, para asegurarse de que su metilación esté activa, el cuerpo humano necesita niveles óptimos de vitaminas B. Sin suficientes vitaminas B, el proceso de metilación se puede descomponer y los efectos pueden ser destructivos. Aquí es donde comenzamos a ver un aumento en los defectos congénitos, como la espina bífida, el síndrome de down y más abortos involuntarios.

MTHFR es frecuentemente anormal en aproximadamente el 35 por ciento de la población. La descomposición de la metilación también puede aumentar el riesgo de desarrollar problemas de salud como la osteoporosis y la diabetes, la displasia cervical o el cáncer, incluido el cáncer de colon y el cáncer de pulmón, e incluso la depresión, la disfunción cognitiva pediátrica, así como los trastornos del humor y del comportamiento, la demencia y los problemas cerebrovasculares. La metilación es verdaderamente un proceso bioquímico clave.

Cuando hablamos de la genética, debemos entender que nuestro entorno puede alterar nuestros genes. Entonces, ¿qué pasa si tienes una variación MTHFR en tus genes? En primer lugar, no todas las mutaciones causan problemas de salud. Una mutación, por modo de ejemplo, conocida como C677T, es una versión del gen que es más significativa que otra versión del gen, conocida como A1298C. Ahora no hay que preocuparse por estas variaciones genéticas. Sirven como ejemplos para demostrarle la calidad de estas mutaciones y cómo funcionan. Las personas con estas variaciones del gen, por ejemplo, solo pueden necesitar más folato o pueden necesitar un tipo particular de folato conocido como metilfolato. Aquí es donde un practicante de medicina funcional puede ayudarle a sus pacientes.

Una prueba genética puede hacerle saber si tiene una de estas variaciones genéticas. Pero, no te estreses. Hay mucho que puede hacer para optimizar su salud y bienestar en general. Muchos pacientes han visitado mi consultorio después de descubrir que tienen estas variaciones en sus genes. Y aprenden rápidamente que tienen la opción de tomar el control de su bienestar. Sin embargo, lo que controlas no son tus genes, controlas tu expresión genética.

Si alteras tus hábitos alimenticios, alteras tus nutrientes. Si altera su entorno, altera qué genes se activan y cuáles se vuelven inactivos. Y con estas mutaciones, puedes hacer casi lo mismo simplemente siguiendo una nutrición adecuada. Cuando encuentre un médico o practicante de medicina funcional que esté dispuesto a trabajar con usted, le dirán qué modificaciones de estilo de vida debe seguir para prevenir problemas de salud.

Por lo tanto, acabamos de discutir las vitaminas B. A continuación, discutiremos otro nutriente fundamental en el cuerpo humano: el magnesio. El magnesio es un mineral súper esencial. Aproximadamente el 48 por ciento de las personas en los Estados Unidos consumen menos de la cantidad requerida de magnesio en los alimentos. El magnesio es necesario en más de 300 reacciones químicas en el cuerpo humano. También es fundamental en la producción de ATP, o la energía que el cuerpo humano utiliza como combustible.

Una prueba o medida del nivel de magnesio en la sangre puede ayudar a determinar si usted tiene una deficiencia. El magnesio también puede ayudar a reducir la ansiedad, calmar el sistema nervioso y mejorar el sueño. También es un nutriente esencial en el manejo de los niveles de azúcar en la sangre. Si un profesional de la salud le ha dicho que tiene un nivel promedio de azúcar en la sangre de más de cinco y medio, algo conocido como A1c, entonces el magnesio puede ayudar.

Además, es muy fácil saber si tiene una deficiencia de magnesio al observar su dieta y síntomas actuales. ¿Come suficientes alimentos ricos en magnesio como verduras de hojas verdes, frijoles, nueces y semillas? ¿O come muchos alimentos procesados? Quizás también tenga síntomas como ansiedad, insomnio, estreñimiento, contracciones musculares, calambres musculares, síndrome premenstrual y palpitaciones. Si tiene uno o más de los síntomas que acabo de mencionar, es posible que tenga una deficiencia de magnesio.

A continuación, hablaremos sobre el zinc, el mineral que estimula la inmunidad y la testosterona en el cuerpo humano. Este importante nutriente se encarga de mantener el volumen de su cabello, así como de reparar su tracto gastrointestinal. También es responsable de asegurarse de que su tiroides funcione correctamente. El zinc puede medirse o analizarse fácilmente en la sangre y, desafortunadamente, es otro nutriente de el que tenemos una gran deficiencia en los Estados Unidos. Además, también se pueden observar sus niveles de fosfatasa alcalina, que pueden calcularse a través de una evaluación de la función hepática en un panel de sangre regular. Los niveles altos de fosfatasa alcalina pueden indicar la presencia de cáncer o problemas óseos, entre otros problemas de salud; sin embargo, los niveles bajos de fosfatasa alcalina pueden indicar una deficiencia de zinc, ya que es una enzima dependiente de zinc.

Finalmente, el último nutriente fundamental de el que vamos a discutir es el hierro. El hierro es frecuentemente deficiente en veganos y vegetarianos, o en mujeres en general debido a la menstruación. El hierro es necesario para transportar oxígeno a través del cuerpo humano y es esencial para la salud y el bienestar del cerebro. El hierro también es importante para el cabello y las uñas, el sueño y muchas otras cosas.

La ferritina es un tipo de hierro almacenado y es este nutriente el que ayuda a ver tus niveles de hierro. Los niveles óptimos de ferritina deben estar entre 50 y 150 en las mujeres y entre 100 y 300 en los hombres. Muchas veces he visto a mujeres visitar mi oficina con niveles de ferritina de menos de 50, o peor, de un solo dígito. Esto se debe a que las mujeres premenopáusicas pierden sangre cada mes debido a sus ciclos menstruales y se les hace mucho más difícil mantener los niveles adecuados de ferritina. Muchas mujeres también comen mucho menos de lo que se supone que deben comer todos los días. Los altos niveles de ferritina, por otro lado, podrían ser un signo de inflamación, generalmente causada por la resistencia de la insulina al azúcar, o podría ser un signo de hemocromatosis o enfermedad por almacenamiento de hierro, un trastorno genético que puede ser muy peligroso.

Tener niveles reducidos de ferritina también puede hacer que se sienta cansado, y puede causar pérdida de cabello, al igual que puede causar insomnio. Entonces, incluso si su recuento sanguíneo es normal, si sus niveles de ferritina son bajos o sus niveles de hierro son bajos, también puede causar estos síntomas. Por eso, si experimenta síntomas de fatiga, es esencial medir o probar sus niveles de ferritina. Y se puede complementar fácilmente.

Aparte de la ferritina, un MCV bajo también puede determinar si usted tiene una deficiencia de hierro. Las deficiencias de hierro pueden hacer que los glóbulos rojos se vuelvan muy pequeños y eso se puede demostrar en los niveles bajos de MCV, que evalúan el tamaño de sus glóbulos rojos. Además, la saturación de transferencia, el hierro sérico, la TIBC o la capacidad de unión al hierro total, y la hemoglobina, pueden brindarnos un análisis más profundo del estado de su hierro para distinguir las diferentes causas de la anemia. Estos se incluyen en un panel de sangre de hierro regular en una prueba de laboratorio.

Hemos discutido varios nutrientes que pueden ser solicitados por la mayoría de los profesionales de la salud con acceso a pruebas de laboratorio convencionales. Además, hay otra prueba que nos puede dar más información sobre qué tipo de nutrientes necesitamos en función de nuestros genes. Se llama la prueba de salud de ADN y es proporcionada por una compañía llamada DNAlife. Esta prueba evalúa una variedad de marcadores genéticos asociados con la desintoxicación, el metabolismo de los lípidos y la inflamación, incluido el gen MTHFR y otros marcadores de vitamina B. Ahora, DNA Health demuestra los diferentes genes que evaluamos. Y la mayoría de estos son genes comunes, son aquellos sobre los que podemos hacer algo. Analizamos los genes que podemos cambiar según su nutrición y otros factores del estilo de vida.

El gen MTHFR nos muestra otros marcadores de vitamina B, genes que controlan B6, folato y B12, además de demostrar cómo funcionan y si usted tiene deficiencias de nutrientes. Luego, nos indica qué nutrientes necesitará complementar y cuánto le daremos. Es tremendamente útil.

Hubo un individuo que tenía dos variables del gen MTHFR. Esta mujer tuvo un aborto involuntario tras otro aborto involuntario tras otro aborto involuntario. Visitó a su médico para una evaluación y resultó que tenía una mutación reguladora del folato. Entonces, su médico comenzó a darle la cantidad adecuada de folato que necesitaba y ella comenzó a tener bebés sanos. A veces, la nutrición puede ser asi de poderosa para mejorar la salud y el bienestar general del paciente.

La prueba de salud del ADN puede ayudar a personalizar su enfoque al optimizar su bienestar basado en su genética. Lo que medimos utilizando la prueba de salud del ADN proporciona información bien establecida acerca de sus genes y lo que puede hacer al respecto.

Una prueba de micronutrientes conocida como el perfil de nutrición optimizado individualizado o el panel ION, son opciones de prueba alternativas que también pueden proporcionar información sobre su estado nutricional actual. Esta prueba es de Genova. Esta es una prueba sólida que mide todas las vitaminas y minerales esenciales, ácidos grasos, ácidos orgánicos y antioxidantes que tiene actualmente. Esta prueba busca desequilibrios, insuficiencias o deficiencias, en lugar de buscar una enfermedad específica. Busca cosas que la mayoría de los médicos nunca buscan.

Los profesionales de la medicina funcional o los médicos observan los niveles de aminoácidos, niveles de minerales e incluso los niveles de toxinas de los metales pesados ​​como mercurio, plomo, arsénico y muchos más. También analizamos sus niveles de antioxidantes, niveles de vitamina A y vitamina E, así como su antioxidante CoQ10 y el estado de betacaroteno. Podemos determinar si una persona come verduras o no si, a modo de ejemplo, tienen niveles bajos de betacaroteno. También analizamos los niveles de vitamina D, ácidos grasos esenciales, incluidas las grasas omega-3 y las grasas omega-6. Podemos determinar si una persona come comida chatarra. Podemos determinar si una persona está comiendo pescado. Y podemos determinar si una persona está comiendo demasiado aceite de oliva o grasas saturadas. Todo está demostrado en estas medidas y pruebas.

Una prueba OAT, o prueba de ácidos orgánicos, también analiza lo que se conoce como ácidos orgánicos. Esta prueba demuestra una amplia gama de parámetros asociados con sus mitocondrias, que analizaremos en el siguiente artículo, sus vitaminas B, sus neurotransmisores, su flora intestinal y su desintoxicación. En última instancia, es un examen completo que me muestra si un paciente está bien o enfermo. Me muestra dónde están los desequilibrios y dónde debo recomendar modificaciones en su estilo de vida. También ayuda a proporcionar pistas sobre otros problemas de salud.

A modo de ejemplo, si sus mitocondrias no funcionan correctamente porque tiene niveles reducidos de aminoácidos esenciales o si tiene un mayor estrés oxidativo o si simplemente tiene niveles bajos de selenio y zinc, existe la posibilidad de que tenga algún tipo de sobrecarga tóxica por metales pesados. Y eso es precisamente lo que iría buscando. Los signos como estos proporcionan mucha información sobre lo que podemos hacer para tratar a un paciente. Y un médico o practicante de medicina funcional con experiencia puede determinar qué está pasando realmente con un paciente o puede ayudar a los pacientes a descubrir cómo optimizar su salud y bienestar en general.

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La nutrición es el estudio de los nutrientes en los alimentos y cómo el cuerpo humano utiliza los nutrientes, así como la relación entre la dieta, las enfermedades, la salud y el bienestar en general. Los nutrientes son una fuente de nutrición, incluidos los carbohidratos, proteínas, grasas, vitaminas, minerales, fibra y agua. La medicina funcional se enfoca en el uso de alimentos como una forma de medicina. Una nutrición equilibrada puede ayudar a prevenir y tratar una variedad de problemas de salud. De manera similar, la nutrición en la medicina funcional implica cómo ciertas enfermedades y condiciones pueden estar asociadas con factores dietéticos, como una mala alimentación o malnutrición, alergias a los alimentos e intolerancias a los alimentos. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C, C.C.S.T.

Entendiendo su Nutrición

Como buenos doctores de medicina funcional, a menudo nos preguntamos, ¿por qué es que tantas personas en los Estados Unidos están sobrealimentadas pero desnutridas? O, ¿por qué es que los estadounidenses comen demasiadas calorías y muy pocos nutrientes? Las principales causas de las deficiencias nutricionales generalizadas son las siguientes: Primero, los humanos evolucionaron de comer alimentos silvestres que contenían niveles tremendamente más altos de nutrientes. Segundo, el suelo que utilizamos actualmente para cultivar nuestros cultivos se ha agotado en gran medida de nutrientes. Las técnicas de hibridación de la agricultura industrial están produciendo animales y vegetales para tener niveles reducidos de nutrientes. Tercero, los alimentos procesados ​​no tienen absolutamente ningún nutriente, por lo que con frecuencia tienen que ser fortificados. Y por último, pero no menos importante, la exposición a las toxinas ambientales, la falta de luz solar, el estrés crónico y la mala alimentación, incluido el aumento del consumo de alcohol, cafeína y azúcar, pueden aumentar nuestras necesidades nutricionales, muchas de las cuales ya no estamos obteniendo lo suficiente de nuestra dieta.

Bueno, es posible que no necesite ninguna vitamina, sin embargo, si puede cumplir con ciertas condiciones. Tal vez si solo cazara y recolectara alimentos silvestres y no estuviera expuesto a toxinas ambientales. O tal vez si se acostaba con el sol y se despertara con el sol, durmiendo nueve horas por noche. Y si no experimenta absolutamente ninguna cantidad de estrés crónico. En última instancia, si solo bebe agua pura y limpia y respira aire puro y limpio. Entonces, probablemente no necesitaría vitaminas. Pero el resto de nosotros que no seguimos estas condiciones, si las necesitamos.

Y con ese pensamiento, terminamos este artículo. En el próximo artículo, hablaremos de hormonas. Las hormonas pueden afectar casi todos los aspectos de nuestro bienestar, y muchos profesionales de la salud no entienden cuáles deben ser nuestros niveles hormonales óptimos o incluso cuándo probarlos y qué hacer al respecto una vez que lo hacen. La medida y prueba de los niveles hormonales debe ser una práctica estándar, y muchos pacientes nunca han tenido un panel de sangre para observar sus hormonas. Es fundamental saber y comprender lo que sucede dentro de su propio cuerpo. Y es por eso es que este próximo artículo es tan importante. No querrá perderse de nuestra próxima actualización. Los veo pronto. El alcance de nuestra información se limita a problemas quiroprácticos y de salud de la columna, así como a temas y discusiones de medicina funcional. Para seguir discutiendo el tema, no dude en preguntarle al Dr. Alex Jimenez o comuníquese con nosotros al 915-850-0900 .

Curado por el Dr. Alex Jiménez

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Discusión del Tema Adicional: Dolor de Espalda Agudo

El dolor de espalda es una de las causas más frecuentes de discapacidad y días perdidos en el trabajo en todo el mundo. El dolor de espalda se atribuye a la segunda razón más común para las visitas al consultorio del médico, superada únicamente por infecciones respiratorias superiores. Aproximadamente el 80 por ciento de la población experimentará dolor de espalda al menos una vez a lo largo de su vida. La columna vertebral es una estructura compleja formada por huesos, articulaciones, ligamentos y músculos, entre otros tejidos blandos. Las lesiones y / o afecciones agravadas, como las hernias de disco, pueden provocar síntomas de dolor de espalda. Las lesiones deportivas o las lesiones por accidentes automovilísticos suelen ser la causa más frecuente de dolor de espalda; sin embargo, a veces los movimientos más simples pueden tener resultados dolorosos. Afortunadamente, las opciones de tratamiento alternativo, como la atención quiropráctica, pueden ayudar a aliviar el dolor de espalda mediante el uso de ajustes de la columna vertebral y manipulaciones manuales, lo que finalmente mejora el alivio del dolor.  

Xymogen Formulas - El Paso, TX

De XYMOGEN Las fórmulas profesionales exclusivas están disponibles a través de profesionales de atención médica con licencia seleccionados. La venta por internet y el descuento de fórmulas XYMOGEN están estrictamente prohibidos.

Con orgullo El Dr. Alexander Jimenez hace que las fórmulas de XYMOGEN estén disponibles solo para los pacientes bajo nuestro cuidado.

Llame a nuestro consultorio para que podamos asignar una consulta médica para acceso inmediato.

Si eres paciente de Injury Medical & Chiropractic Clinic, puedes preguntar por XYMOGEN llamando 915-850-0900.

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Para su conveniencia y revisión de la XYMOGEN productos por favor revise el siguiente enlace. *XYMOGEN-Descargar-Catalogo

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Functional Medicine Part 3: Nutrition

Functional Medicine Part 3: Nutrition

Functional Medicine Doctor Explains Nutrition

Each chemical reaction which occurs in the human body requires enzymes and each one of these processes needs a coenzyme. But what are coenzymes? They are vitamins and minerals. Approximately 37 billion, billion chemical reactions occur in the human body every second.

That is why proper nutrition and a balanced diet rich in whole foods with vitamins and minerals is fundamental towards overall health and wellness. The majority of people in the United States are vitamin and/or mineral deficient. But, how do you know if you’re a part of the 90 percent of individuals with enough deficiencies to develop disease? We will discuss the tests you can utilize to find out if you’re vitamin and/or mineral deficient and what you can do about it.

What is Nutrition?

Hello, welcome to part three of “Taking Control of your Healthcare”. Today, we will discuss one of the fun topics of functional medicine: nutrition. Unfortunately, nutrition is one of the most essential conversations that many doctors aren’t willing to have with their patients. The average medical doctor learns about disease and malnutrition rather than learning how to use nutrition as treatment or even how to use nutritional therapies to achieve optimal health and wellness.

I personally believe that food can be utilized as a form of medicine. That it should be the foundation of medical practice, not an afterthought in medicine. There is no better treatment than proper nutrition. Approximately 90 percent of individuals in the United States aren’t getting the essential nutrients they require for healthy bodily functions. And more than that probably aren’t getting enough nutrients to prevent diseases associated with nutritional deficiencies. However, what is ultimately needed to achieve optimal well-being? More than 98 percent of Americans are deficient in omega-3, 80 percent in vitamin D, 50 percent in magnesium, and 10 percent in vitamin C. Nutrient deficiencies can also continue to cause health issues for years.

Acute diseases, such as rickets, scurvy, beriberi, or iron deficiency anemia, are often the most talked about health issues associated with nutrient deficiency, however, there’s also something known as long latency deficiency diseases. So, how much vitamin D do we need to not get rickets? Not a lot, only 30 units really. And how much do we need to not get osteoporosis? Perhaps about 3,000 to 4,000 units per day. Now, how much folate do we need to not get anemia? Also not very much. But, how much do we need to prevent heart disease, cancer, and dementia? You definitely need a lot more units per day.

Each chemical reaction which occurs in the human body requires enzymes and each one of these processes needs a coenzyme. But what are coenzymes? They are vitamins and minerals. Approximately 37 billion, billion chemical reactions occur in the human body every second.

That is why proper nutrition and a balanced diet rich in whole foods with vitamins and minerals is fundamental towards overall health and wellness. The majority of people in the United States are vitamin and/or mineral deficient. But, how do you know if you’re a part of the 90 percent of individuals with enough deficiencies to develop disease? There are only several nutrients which we are generally tested for. And for a majority of these, doctors aren’t aware of what the optimal values should be which can make correcting the nutrient deficiency so much difficult to do.

Taking Control of Your Nutrition

One of the most fundamental nutrients you need to measure is vitamin D. Although it’s referred to as a vitamin, it’s actually more like a hormone and it’s produced from cholesterol. This is yet another reason why cholesterol is essential. Approximately 80 percent of the population is deficient in vitamin D. Unless you’re in the sun 20 minutes every day between 10:00am and 2:00pm, you might need to take vitamin D supplements. In order to supplement properly, however, we need to know from what level you are starting at first. By way of instance, optimal vitamin D levels should be anywhere between 50 and 80 nanograms per milliliter of blood. The recommended amount of vitamin D we can supplement is about 2,000 to 4,000 units.

If you have lower vitamin D levels or if you have genetic problems, you may actually need to supplement with up to 10,000 units of vitamin D. That’s why it’s fundamental to work with a doctor or functional medicine practitioner who can measure and test your nutrient levels as well as help you optimize them. Most supplements contain about 400 units which is 10 times less than the amount most of us need. The optimal levels are generally just over 20. This is way too low. In one research study, women with vitamin D levels between 45 and 60 experienced reduced preterm labors by up to 60 percent. Vitamin D is also essential to help build strong bones and muscles, to improve immune system function, to prevent cancer, and ultimately, to help you live longer. It’s incredible.

Another measurement or test that’s performed by most doctors but is not always interpreted correctly is referred to as the MCV or mean corpuscular volume. The MCV measurement evaluates the size of your red blood cells in a test called CBC, or complete blood count, which is one of the most common blood panels ordered by healthcare professionals. So, if you are deficient in nutrients, your cells can either become smaller or larger. By way of instance, if your cells are too big, it could be a signs of a folate or vitamin B12 deficiency.

B vitamins are essential in numerous chemical reactions within the human body. They help us produce energy as well as help us regulate gene expression in order to create proteins that will ensure our overall health and wellness. If our B vitamins are too low, we could eventually develop an iron deficiency, anemia, or it could even cause a genetic disorder.

Optimal levels of B vitamins should be between 80 to 90. B complex vitamin supplements can help easily optimize levels of B vitamins. But, why would anyone be deficient in B vitamins? Is their diet not providing them with enough nutrients? Are they vegan? Are they taking any drugs and/or medications that prevent vitamin B12 absorption? Moreover, B vitamins are depleted during times of high stress which, as a practicing chiropractor, I can say it happens frequently to a majority of the population in the United States alone.

MCV is not the only measurement or test which evaluates a patient’s levels of B vitamins. Homocysteine is an alternative marker we will discuss in future articles which demonstrates B6, folate, and B12 levels. However, both the MCV and the homocysteine measurement or test only demonstrates that one or more of these nutrients may be deficient. It doesn’t necessarily tell us which one. Therefore, some additional, follow up evaluations may be required.

The MMA, or methylmalonic acid, measurement or test also shows vitamin B12 levels. Ultimately, vitamin B12 is essential for many processes in the human body, including energy production, gene expression, methylation, nerve function, and mood, among many other processes. Vegans have a higher chance of developing a B12 deficiency because it’s only found in animal products. Folate is another fundamental B vitamin. It can be determined directly in the blood, but, homocysteine is a more precise marker for folate levels.

In this section, we’re also going to discuss genetics because there is a measurement or test which can demonstrate a lot more regarding the status of your B vitamins and your ability to utilize them. Our genes are capable of making proteins. We have approximately 20,000 genes which are designed to create proteins. And one third of all the proteins they make are for our enzymes. Enzymes convert molecules into other molecules. These enzymes are also largely dependent on specific nutrients. One of the most fundamental genes which can be affected is known as MTHFR, or methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. But you can just call it MTHFR.

MTHFR is essential because it helps regulate methylation, homocysteine, and folate, which are vital towards our overall health and wellness. When you have elevated levels of homocysteine, you should check your methylation status by looking for the MTHFR gene through a simple blood test.

Methylation is a key biochemical process which is fundamental towards the proper function of most of the human body’s systems. It triggers billions of times each second. And it ultimately helps control homocysteine, a substance which can damage blood vessels and has been associated with dementia, heart disease, and cancer, among other health issues. Methylation also helps repair your DNA on a regular basis as it helps recycle molecules necessary for detoxification, or getting rid of toxins. It also helps control your mood and it helps manage inflammation. Methylation is critical.

But, to make sure that methylation is active, the human body needs optimal levels of B vitamins. Without enough B vitamins, the methylation process can break down and the effects can be destructive. This is where we start seeing an increase in birth defects, such as spina bifida, down syndrome, and more miscarriages.

MTHFR is frequently abnormal in approximately 35 percent of the population. Methylation breakdown can also increase the risk of developing health issues like osteoporosis and diabetes, cervical dysplasia or cancer, including colon cancer and lung cancer, and even depression, pediatric cognitive dysfunction as well as mood and behavioral disorders, dementia, and stroke. Methylation is truly a key biochemical process.

When we discuss genetics, we have to understand that our environment can alter our genes. So, what if you have an MTHFR variation in your genes? First of all, not all mutations cause health issues. One mutation, by way of instance, known as C677T, is one version of the gene which is more significant than another version of the gene, known as A1298C. Now there’s no need to worry about these gene variations. They serve as examples to demonstrate you the quality of these mutations and how they function. People with these variations of the gene, by way of instance, might only need more folate or they might need a particular type of folate known as methylfolate. This is where a functional medicine practitioner can help their patients.

A genetic test can let you known if you have one of these gene variations. But, don’t get stressed. There’s a lot you can do to optimize your overall health and wellness. Many patients have visited my office after they find out they have these variations in their genes. And they quickly learn that they do have the option to take control of their well-being. However, what you do control is not your genes, you control your gene expression.

If you alter your healthy eating habits, you alter your nutrients. If you alter your environment, you alter which genes become active and which genes become inactive. And with these mutations, you can do just about the same thing by simply following the proper nutrition. When you find a doctor or functional medicine practitioner that’s willing to work with you, they’re going to tell you what lifestyle modifications you should follow to prevent health issues.

So, we’ve only just discussed the B vitamins. Next, we will discuss another fundamental nutrient in the human body: magnesium. Magnesium is a super essential mineral. Approximately 48 percent of people in the United States consume less than the required amount of magnesium from food. Magnesium is necessary in over 300 chemical reactions in the human body. It is also fundamental in the production of ATP, or the energy the human body utilizes as fuel.

A magnesium level blood measurement or test can help determine if you have a deficiency. Magnesium can also help reduce anxiety, calm the nervous system, and improve sleep. It is also an essential nutrient in the management of blood sugar levels. If you’ve been told by a healthcare professional that you have an average blood sugar level of over five and a half in something known as A1c, then magnesium can help.

Also, it’s very easy to know if you have a magnesium deficiency by looking at your current diet and symptoms. Do you eat enough magnesium rich foods like dark, leafy greens, beans, nuts and seeds? Or do you eat a lot of processed foods? Perhaps you also have symptoms such as anxiety, insomnia, constipation, muscle twitching, muscle cramps, PMS, and/or palpitations. If you have one or more of the symptoms I just mentioned, you may have a magnesium deficiency.

Next, we will talk about zinc, the immune-boosting and testosterone-boosting mineral in the human body. This important nutrient is in charge of maintaining your hair volume as well as repairing your gut lining. It’s also responsible for making sure your thyroid is functioning properly. Zinc can be easily measured or tested in the blood and unfortunately, it’s another nutrient we are highly deficient in, in the United States. Additionally, you can also look at your alkaline phosphatase levels, which can be calculated through a liver function evaluation on a regular blood panel. High levels of alkaline phosphatase may indicate the presence of cancer or bone problems, among other health issues, however, low levels of alkaline phosphatase may indicate a zinc deficiency, because it’s a zinc-dependent enzyme.

Finally, the last fundamental nutrient we are going to discuss is iron. Iron is frequently deficient in vegans and vegetarians, or in women in general due to menstruation. Iron is necessary for transporting oxygen throughout the human body and it’s ultimately essential for brain health and wellness. Iron is also important for hair and nails, sleep, and so many other things.

Ferritin is a stored type of iron and it’s this nutrient which helps you see your iron levels. Optimal ferritin levels should be between 50 to 150 in women and 100 to 300 in men. And many times I’ve seen women visit my office who have ferritin levels of less than 50, or worse, in the single digits. This is because pre-menopausal women lose blood every month due to their menstrual cycles and it becomes so much harder for them to maintain proper ferritin levels. Many women also eat way less than what they’re supposed to be eating every day. High levels of ferritin, on the other hand, could be a sign of inflammation, generally caused by insulin resistance to sugar, or it could be a sign of hemochromatosis or iron storage disease, a very dangerous genetic disorder.

Having decreased levels of ferritin can also make you feel tired, and it can cause hair loss, it can cause insomnia. So, even if your blood count is normal, if your ferritin levels are low or your iron levels are low, it can also cause these symptoms. That’s why if you experience symptoms of fatigue, it’s essential to measure or test your ferritin levels. And it can be easily supplemented.

Aside from ferritin, a low MCV can also determine if you have an iron deficiency. Iron deficiencies can cause red blood cells to become very small and that can be demonstrated in low MCV levels, which evaluate the size of your red blood cells. Additionally, transference saturation, serum iron, TIBC, or total iron binding capacity, and hemoglobin, can provide us with a more in depth look at your iron status to distinguish different causes of anemia. These are included on a regular iron blood panel in a lab test.

We’ve discussed several nutrients which can be ordered by a majority of healthcare professinals with access to conventional lab testing. Furthermore, there’s another test which can tell us more about which type of nutrients we need based on our genes. It’s called the DNA health test and it’s provided by a company called DNAlife. This test evaluates a variety of genetic markers associated with detoxification, lipid metabolism, and inflammation, including the MTHFR gene and other B vitamin markers. Now, DNA Health demonstrates the different genes we evaluate. And most of these are common genes, they’re those we can do something about. We analyze the genes we can change based on your nutrition and other lifestyle factors.

It shows us the MTHFR gene, other B vitamin markers, genes that control B6, folate, and B12 as well as demonstrating how they function and whether you have nutrient deficiencies. Then it tells us which nutrients you will need to supplement and how much we will need to give to you. It’s tremendously helpful.

There was an individual who had two variables of the MTHFR gene. This woman had miscarriage after miscarriage after miscarriage. She visited her doctor for an evaluation and it turns out that she had a folate-regulating mutation. So her doctor then started giving her the proper amount of folate she needed and she started having healthy babies. Sometimes, nutrition can be that powerful towards improving a patient’s overall health and wellness.

The DNA health test can help personalize your approach when optimizing your well-being based on your genetics. What we measure utilizing the DNA health test provide well-established insights about your genes as well as what you can do about them.

A micronutrient test known as the individualized optimized nutrition profile or the ION panel, are alternative test options which can also provide information about your current nutritional status. This test is by Genova. This is a robust test which measures all the essential vitamins and minerals, fatty acids, organic acids, and antioxidants you currently have. Ultimately, this test looks for imbalances, insufficiencies, or deficiencies, rather than looking for a specific disease. It looks for things that a majority of doctors never look at.

Functional medicine practitioners or doctors look at patient’s amino acid levels, mineral levels, and even toxin levels from heavy metals like mercury, lead, arsenic, and many more. We also look at your antioxidant levels, vitamin A and vitamin E levels, as well as your CoQ10 antioxidant and beta carotene status. We can determine if a person eats vegetables or not if, by way of instance, they have low levels of beta carotene. We also look at vitamin D levels, essential fatty acids, including your omega-3 fats and your omega-6 fats. We can tell if a person eats junk food. We can tell if a person is eating fish. And We can tell if a person is eating too much olive oil or saturated fats. It’s all demonstrated in these measurements and tests.

An OAT test, or organic acids test, also looks at what is known as organic acids. This test demonstrates a wide array of parameters associated with your mitochondria, which we will discuss in the next article, your B vitamins, your neurotransmitters, your gut flora, and your detoxification. It’s ultimately a comprehensive test which shows me if a patient is well or sick. It shows me where the imbalances are and where I need to recommend lifestyle modifications. It also helps provide clues about other health issues.

By way of instance, if your mitochondria aren’t functioning correctly because you have decreased levels of essential amino acids or you have increased oxidative stress or if you simply have low levels of selenium and zinc, there’s a possibility that you might have some form of toxic overload due to heavy metals. And that’s precisely what I would go looking for. Signs like these provide a lot of information about what we can do to treat a patient. And an experienced functional medicine practitioner or doctor can determine what’s really going on with a patient or they can help patients discover how to optimize their overall health and wellness.

Dr Jimenez White Coat
Nutrition is the study of nutrients in food and how the human body utilizes nutrients as well as the relationship between diet, disease and overall health and wellness. Nutrients are a source of nourishment, including carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, fiber and water. Functional medicine focuses on the use of food as a form of medicine. A balanced nutrition can help prevent as well as treat a variety of health issues. Similarly, nutrition in functional medicine involves how certain diseases and conditions may be associated with dietary factors, such as poor diet or malnutrition, food allergies and food intolerances. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

Understanding Your Nutrition

As good functional medicine doctors we’re often left asking ourselves, why is it that so many people in the United States are overfed but undernourished? Or, why is it that Americans eat too many calories and too few nutrients? The leading causes for the widespread nutritional deficiencies are the following: First, humans evolved from eating wild foods which contained tremendously higher levels of nutrients. Second, the soil we currently utilize to grow our crops in has become greatly depleted of nutrients. Hybridization techniques from industrial farming are yielding animals and vegetables to have decreased levels of nutrients. Third, processed foods have absolutely no nutrients, which is why they frequently have to be fortified. And last but not least, exposure to environmental toxins, lack of sunlight, chronic stress, and poor diet, including increased alcohol, caffeine, and sugar consumption, can increase our nutritional needs, much of which we’re already not getting enough from our current nutrition.

Well you might not need any vitamins, however, if you can meet certain conditions. Perhaps if you only hunted and gathered wild food and if you weren’t exposed to environmental toxins. Or maybe if you went to sleep with the sun and woke up with the sun, sleeping nine hours a night. And if you experienced absolutely no amount of chronic stress. Ultimately if you only drank pure, clean water and breathed pure, clean air. Then, you probably wouldn’t need any vitamins. But the rest of us that don’t follow these conditions, we do need them.

And with that thought, we wrap up this article. In the next article, we will talk about hormones. Hormones can affect almost every aspect of our well-being, and many healthcare professionals don’t understand what our optimal hormone levels should be or even when to test them and what to do about it once they do. Measuring and testing hormone levels should be standard practice, and many patients have never had a blood panel to look at their hormones. It’s fundamental to know as well as understand what’s going on inside your own body. And that’s why this next article is so important. You won’t want to miss our next update. See you soon.

The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues as well as functional medicine topics and discussions. To further discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Alex Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. The spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.  

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Ketogenic Diet and Intermittent Fasting

Ketogenic Diet and Intermittent Fasting

Why is it that the ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting always seem to fall within the same topic of conversation? This is simply because intermittent fasting may be utilized as an instrument to achieve ketosis, the metabolic state associated with the keto diet. During intermittent fasting, the human body is depleted of glycogen stores. Once these glycogen stores are eliminated, fat stores are then released into the bloodstream in order to be converted into energy molecules, known as ketones, from the liver.

What is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a metabolic state which uses ketone bodies, or ketones, as fuel for energy. On a normal carbohydrate-based diet, the human body burns glucose as its main fuel source, where excess glucose is subsequently stored as glycogen. If the human body cannot utilize sugar as fuel for energy, it will utilize glycogen as fuel for energy. Once glycogen is depleted, you begin to burn fat. The ketogenic diet generates a metabolic state which enables you to break down fat into ketones, or ketone bodies, in the liver for energy.

There are 3 major types ketone bodies found in the blood, urine, and breath, including:

  • Acetoacetate: The type of ketone which is created first. It may be converted to beta-hydroxybutyrate or flipped into acetone.
  • Acetone: Made spontaneously in the breakdown of acetoacetate. It is a very volatile ketone and it is frequently detectable on the breath once an individual first enters ketosis.
  • Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB): The type of ketone which is utilized for energy and is most abundant on the bloodstream as soon as you’re completely into ketosis. It is the kind that is located in exogenous ketones and what blood tests quantify.

Intermittent Fasting in the Keto Diet

Intermittent fasting is composed of eating within a specific feeding window rather than eating throughout the day. Each individual, whether they are conscious of it or not, fasts intermittently from dinner to breakfast. There are lots of methods to intermittent fasting. A few individuals fast for 16-20 hours intervals on alternate days while others follow a 24-hour day fast. The most common intermittent fasting variety is the 16/8 method, in which you eat in an 8-hour window followed by a 16-hour fasting window.

Other fasting programs incorporate the 20/4 or even 14/10 methods. Other people follow 24-hour fasts one or two times each week. Intermittent fasting can get you in ketosis quicker because your cells will immediately absorb your glycogen stores and begin burning fat. However, what about once you get into ketosis? Is intermittent fasting worth following consistently? Following the ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting can be a great addition towards an individual’s overall health and wellness, providing various health benefits.

The keto diet and intermittent fasting can provide the following health benefits, including:

  • Healthy weight-loss
  • Fat reduction, not muscle reduction
  • Balancing cholesterol levels
  • Enhancing insulin sensitivity
  • Maintaining blood glucose levels steady

Health Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet dramatically reduces your caloric intake, forcing your body to burn fat instead of sugar, which makes it a powerful tool for weight reduction. While individual results vary, the keto diet has always resulted in a decrease in body fat in a selection of situations. Within a 2017 study, subjects who followed a very low carbohydrate keto meal program significantly decreased body fat percentage and body fat mass, losing an average of 7.6 lbs and 2.6 percent body fat while preserving lean muscle mass.

Likewise, a 2004 research detecting the long-term consequences of a ketogenic diet in overweight patients discovered that the weight and body mass of those patients diminished dramatically over the span of two decades. Individuals who radically reduced their carb intake saw a substantial decline in LDL (bad) cholesterol, triglycerides, and enhanced insulin sensitivity. In 2012, researchers compared a ketogenic diet to eating fewer calories for overweight kids and adults. The results showed kids after the keto diet lost significantly more body fat. They also revealed a dramatic decline in insulin levels, a biomarker of Type 2 diabetes.

Health Benefits of Intermittent Fasting

Studies have shown that intermittent fasting may be an effective weight loss tool, more powerful than just cutting calories. In one analysis, intermittent fasting has been proven to be as successful as constant calorie restriction in combating obesity. In studies done by the NIH, there was reported weight reduction with over 84 percent of participants, regardless of which fasting program they picked.

Much like ketosis, intermittent fasting increases fat loss while preserving lean muscle mass. In one study, researchers reasoned that fasting led to greater weight loss compared to a low-carb diet, though the overall caloric consumption was exactly the same. If you are attempting to lose weight, then a keto diet or intermittent fasting can be a massive help. But that is not where the rewards stop.

Intermittent Fasting and the Keto Diet for Mental Health

Both intermittent fasting and the ketogenic diet can provide various mental health advantages. Both have been clinically shown to boost memory, improve mental clarity and focus, as well as prevent the development of neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s and epilepsy. On a carb-based diet, changes in glucose can cause changes in energy levels. During ketosis, your brain employs a more consistent supply of fuel: ketones from the fat stores, leading to better productivity and psychological performance.

Whenever you’ve got a consistent and clean energy source from ketones, the brain works better. In addition to this, ketones are better at protecting your brain. Studies reveal that ketone bodies might have antioxidant properties which protect your brain cells from free radicals and oxidative stress. In one study conducted on adults with diminished memory, the growth of BHB ketones in their own blood helped enhance cognition. Also, when you’ve got difficulty staying focused, your hormones can be to blame.

Your brain has two chief neurotransmitters: glutamate and GABA. Glutamate will help you form new memories, and get your brain cells to communicate with one another. GABA is what helps restrain glutamate. If there is too much glutamate, it can cause brain cells to quit working and finally perish. GABA is there to control and slow down glutamate. If GABA levels are reduced, glutamate reigns free and you experience mental fog. Ketones stop damage to cells by processing surplus glutamate into GABA. Considering that ketones raise GABA and lessen glutamate, they assist in preventing cell damage, preventing cell death and enhancing mental focus.

Researchers believe that intermittent fasting enhances memory, decreases oxidative stress, and conserves learning abilities. Since your cells are under moderate strain whilst fasting, the top cells adapt to the stress by improving their particular ability to deal with these circumstances while the weakest tissues die. This is much like the strain that your body gets when you reach the gym.

Exercise is a kind of stress that your body adjusts to improve and get more powerful. This also applies for intermittent fasting: so long as you are still alternate between routine eating habits and fasting, it is going to continue to benefit you. Implying equally that ketosis and intermittent fasting will help improve your cognitive functioning because of the synergistic and protective effects of ketones.

Dr Jimenez White Coat
The ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting are two different nutritional strategies which provide many common health benefits. According to various research studies, both the keto diet and intermittent fasting can help boost ketones, helping the body burn fat more efficiently than any other nutritional strategy. And when these are utilized together, they definitely form a powerful dietary program. The article above discusses the differences between the ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting as well as demonstrates the health benefits of both of these dietary programs and how they can help improve overall health and wellness. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

The Perks of Intermittent Fasting and the Keto Diet

The ketogenic diet and intermittent fasting possess similar health benefits because both approaches involve ketosis. Ketosis has lots of physical and mental advantages, from weight loss to enhanced brain function. People following a ketogenic diet may use intermittent fasting as a tool to achieve ketosis and enhance their general well-being. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. The spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.  

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EXTRA EXTRA | IMPORTANT TOPIC: Recommended El Paso, TX Chiropractor

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Nutrition Facts In Multiple Sclerosis

Nutrition Facts In Multiple Sclerosis

Many healthcare professionals highly recommend that patients with multiple sclerosis, or MS, avoid dairy. Several research studies have demonstrated a high correlation between MS and dairy, especially cow’s milk. By way of instance, some of the proteins in cow’s milk are targeted by the immune cells of patients with multiple sclerosis. These include butyrophilin and bovine serum albumin, or BSA. Moreover, injecting those same cow’s milk proteins into test animals caused lesions to appear in their central nervous systems.

Some proteins in cow’s milk imitate part of the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, or MOG, the section of myelin believed to initiate the autoimmune reaction associated with multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, this can trick the immune system into initiating an attack on the MOG, subsequently causing demyelination. Another research study involving more than 135,000 men and women in the United States determined a connection between cow’s milk and the degenerative neurological disorder, Parkinson’s Disease. Researchers have speculated that dairy products, especially cow’s milk, may have a generally toxic effect on nervous tissue.

Lactose intolerance is common throughout the general population, and it is most notably frequent in Mediterranean, Asian, and African populations. People with lactose intolerance experience a variety of symptoms, including bloating, cramps, diarrhea, and nausea. Given the high potential risks for people with MS consuming dairy products, despite a lack of conclusive evidence, healthcare professionals recommend avoiding the consumption of dairy products, among other types of foods. The purpose of the article below is to discuss the nutrition facts in multiple sclerosis, including which types of foods patients with MS should avoid, such as dairy.

Abstract

The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness.

Keywords: complementary alternative medicine, gut microbiota, inflammation, lifestyle, multiple sclerosis, nutrition

Introduction

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), leading to widespread focal degradation of the myelin sheath, variable axonal and neuronal injury, and disabilities in young adults, mostly women. The disease is characterized by disseminated and heterogeneous perivascular inflammatory processes at the blood–brain barrier (BBB), with involvement of autoreactive T cells, B lymphocytes, macrophages, and microglial cells against brain and spinal cord white matter (McFarland and Martin, 2007; Constantinescu and Gran, 2010; Kutzelnigg and Lassmann, 2014).

Antibodies (Krumbholz et al., 2012), activated complement (Ingram et al., 2014), cytokines, mitochondrial dysfunction (Su et al., 2009), reactive oxygen species (ROS; Gilgun-Sherki et al., 2004), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs; Liuzzi et al., 2002; Rossano et al., 2014) may cooperate to yield the pathology.

From the clinical point of view, there are at least two main forms of the disease: the relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS; about 85% of clinical cases) and the primary-progressive MS (PPMS; about 15% of the clinical cases) (Dutta and Trapp, 2014; Lublin et al., 2014). In RRMS, which usually evolves in secondary-progressive MS (SPMS), relapses are associated with increased systemic inflammation and formation of lesions in the brain, followed by more or less complete remissions, whereas the pathogenesis of PPMS is characterized by progressive neurological damages rather than relapses and remissions.

At present, there are at least 10 disease-modifying therapies that have been found to slow disease progression and prevent some disability symptoms, but only in the case of RRMS. However, as the disease is complex in nature and unique in the individual course, no patient responds to therapy in the same way (Loleit et al., 2014). Similarly, there are no truly reliable biomarkers that allow for everyone to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and it is therefore important to discover novel markers of the disease (Fernandez et al., 2014).

The lack of response to immune-modulatory therapies in the case of PPMS, otherwise effective in the treatment of RRMS, may be due to different pathogenic mechanisms acting in RRMS and PPMS. However, this is not true with regard to inflammation: A significant association between inflammation and neurodegeneration has been observed in the brain not only in acute and relapsing MS but also in the secondary and primary progressive MS (Frischer et al., 2009; Lassmann, 2013), and active MS lesions are always associated with inflammation (Kutzelnigg and Lassmann, 2014). Thus, inflammation must be the target for the treatment of both forms of the disease.

Linking Inflammation with Dietary Habits and Lifestyle

What causes the inflammatory processes in MS? MS is a complex disease, and the genetic and the immunological components are not sufficient to explain its origin. Actually, MS has a multifactorial nature and various environmental factors or metabolic conditions may have a role in its development (Ascherio, 2013): viral infections (Ascherio et al., 2012; Venkatesan and Johnson, 2014), heavy metal poisoning (Latronico et al., 2013; Zanella and Roberti di Sarsina, 2013), smoking (Jafari and Hintzen, 2011), childhood obesity (Munger, 2013), low vitamin D status (Ascherio et al., 2014), or incorrect lifestyle, including wrong dietary habits (Riccio, 2011; Riccio et al., 2011; Riccio and Rossano, 2013).

None of the above-mentioned environmental factors alone can explain the disease; however, the following considerations make more attractive the involvement in MS of dietary habits and lifestyle, rather than infections or smoking, as factors that may influence the course of the disease:

  1. Geographical distribution: MS is more prevalent in Western countries with the highest income and most distant of the equator. Features of these countries are a sedentary lifestyle, a high-calorie diet rich in saturated fats of animal origin (Western diet), and low sunshine exposure (WHO and MSIF, 2008).
  2. Effect of migration: With the migration from an area of high incidence of MS to another place with low incidence before age of 15 years, the low risk is acquired, while the migration after this age does not change the level of risk. This aspect may be linked with nutritional, rather than with infectious or toxicological environmental factors (McLeod et al., 2011).
  3. Low availability of vitamin D: Another environmental factor related to diet and geographical distribution is the availability of vitamin D, which is lower at latitudes with lower exposure to sunlight. Patients with MS have a low content of vitamin D (Ascherio et al., 2014), but this is true also for other chronic inflammatory diseases (Yin and Agrawal, 2014).
  4. Postprandial inflammation: High animal fat/high sugar and refined carbohydrate diet is associated with postprandial inflammation (Erridge et al., 2007; Ghanim et al., 2009; Margioris, 2009).
  5. High body mass index: High body mass index (BMI) before age 20 is associated with 2× increased risk (Hedström et al., 2012). Note that BMI is correlated with gut microbiota status.
  6. Similarity with other inflammatory diseases related to wrong dietary habits: MS has some similarities with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Cantorna, 2012): both have low vitamin D and are influenced from environmental factors (Dam et al., 2013). Furthermore, glatiramer acetate (GA, or Copolymer 1/Copaxone) is beneficial in both diseases (Aharoni, 2013) and there is an increased incidence of IBD among MS patients.

How Food Affects the Course of Inflammatory Diseases: A Basic Approach

The observations reported above suggest that the nutritional status may influence the course of MS. However, the question arises of how dietary molecules could exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms, and in general how they could favor or downregulate inflammation at molecular level. In particular, it is important to clarify what are the targets of dietary molecules and the molecular mechanisms involved, if any.

Fundamentally, we can say that the food we consume has a broad impact on our development, behavior, health condition, and lifespan by acting on two main targets: (A) the cells of our body and (B) the commensal gut microbiota (Figure 1).

  • On one hand, different kind and amount of dietary factors can interact with enzymes, transcription factors, and nuclear receptors of human cells. This may induce specific modifications of cellular metabolism toward either catabolism or anabolism and modulate the inflammatory and autoimmune responses in our body (Desvergne et al., 2006).
  • On the other hand, we have to consider the impact of diet and lifestyle on our intestinal microflora. We are indeed metaorganisms living with trillions (1014) of microbial cells (roughly 10 times the cells of our body) and thousands of different microorganisms known as the gut microbiota. This complex ecosystem is an essential part of our organism and influences both our immune system and our metabolism. Therefore, it has a strong impact on our health.

In health, there is a close mutualistic and symbiotic relationship between gut microbiota and humans, and gut microbiota provides a number of useful metabolic functions, protects against enteropathogens, and contributes to normal immune functions. This is the normal state of the human intestinal microbiota, called eubiosis. Distortion from eubiosis, linked with a decrease of intestinal biodiversity and increase of pathogenic bacteria, is called dysbiosis. The most common consequence of a dysbiotic gut microbiota is the alteration of the mucosal immune system and the rise of inflammatory, immune, metabolic, or degenerative diseases (Chassaing and Gewirtz, 2014).

Different kinds and amounts of dietary factors elicit the selection of specific gut microbial populations changing type and number of microbial species toward eubiosis or dysbiosis, simply acting through the preferential feeding of one or the other microbial population. If our diet favors the change to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, this may lead to gut inflammation, alteration of intestinal immunity, and then to systemic inflammation and chronic inflammatory diseases.

How Dietary Factors Influence the Metabolism of Human Cells and Modulate Inflammation

To understand how dietary molecules can directly influence the metabolism of human cells, it is necessary to describe first what are the enzymes and transcription factors involved in catabolism or anabolism in the cell.

As shown on the left in Figure 2, oxidative metabolism is upregulated by two enzymes and a nuclear receptor. The enzymes are the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK; Steinberg and Kemp, 2009) and the Sirtuins (SIRT), a group of histone deacylating enzymes, which are activated by NAD+ (Zhang et al., 2011; Rice et al., 2012). The nuclear receptor is represented by the isotypes of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs; Desvergne and Wahli, 1999; Burns and VandenHeuvel, 2007).

 

PPAR isotypes upregulate the transcription of genes involved in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids in mitochondria and peroxisomes and form a network with AMPK and Sirtuins pathways. The AMPK-Sirtuins-PPAR pathway is activated by a lifestyle based on calorie restriction and physical exercise, as well as by some bioactive molecules (polyphenols, found in vegetables and fruits, and omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids [PUFA], found in fish). Ligand-activated PPAR isotypes form heterodimeric complexes with the retinoid X-receptor (RXR), which, in turn, is activated by 9-cis-retinoic acid (RA).

Conversely, as shown on the right in Figure 2—like on the other dish of an imaginary balance—high intake of energy-dense nutrients leads to the upregulation of anabolism, including lipogenesis and cell growth, through the activation of the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins, SREBP-1c and SREBP-2 (Xu et al., 2013), and the carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein, ChREBP (Xu et al., 2013). SREBP-1c and SREBP-2 are under the control of the nuclear receptors called the liver X receptors (LXR; Mitro et al., 2007; Nelissen et al., 2012). LXR isotypes, which are activated by the cholesterol derivatives oxysterols and glucose, have a relevant role in the synthesis of lipids by activating SREBP-1c and the synthesis of triacylglycerols, while inhibiting SREBP-2 and the synthesis of cholesterol.

Central to the understanding of the link between diet and inflammation are two transcription factors involved in inflammation and autoimmunity: the nuclear transcription factor-kB (NF-kB) and the activator protein (AP-1; Yan and Greer, 2008). In MS, both NF-kB and AP-1 are activated and induce the expression of several proinflammatory genes and the production of proinflammatory molecules. The cause of their activation in MS is not known but, as shown in Figure 2 for NF-kB, this can be activated not only by viruses, cytokines, and oxidative stress but also by some dietary components such as saturated fatty acids or trans unsaturated fatty acids, which therefore can be considered proinflammatory.

Downregulation of the proinflammatory NF-kB can be achieved by the inhibitory binding of the RA-activated forms of the retinoid X-receptor isotypes (RXRs; Pérez et al., 2012; Zhao et al., 2012; Fragoso et al., 2014).

As shown in the center of Figure 2 and more in detail in Figure 3, the active forms of RA-RXRs are heterodimers resulting from their association with specific ligand-activated nuclear receptors, namely PPARs, LXRs, and vitamin D receptor (VDR).

All three nuclear receptors—PPAR, LXR, and VDR—must be activated by specific ligands. As indicated in Figure 2, the ligands can be specific dietary factors and this clarify how cells respond to changes in nutritional status and regulate energy homeostasis but represents also the molecular key to understanding how nutrients can influence the course of chronic inflammatory diseases (Heneka et al., 2007; Zhang-Gandhi and Drew, 2007; Krishnan and Feldman, 2010; Cui et al., 2011; Schnegg and Robbins, 2011; Gray et al., 2012).

Therefore, each of the three nuclear receptors—PPAR, LXR, and VDR—competes for the binding to RA-RXR and forms hetero-complexes that can inhibit NF-kB and exert a tight control over the expression of inflammatory genes, thus integrating metabolic and inflammatory signaling. It is clear that there is competition between the three receptors PPAR, LXR, and VDR-D, for the binding with RA-RXR, but this competition should have an influence only on metabolism and not on inflammation, because it is not yet known which of the three heterodimers is more effective in inhibiting NF-kB.

Obviously, the production of proinflammatory molecules in the course of relapses is a biosynthetic process: It is sustained by hypercaloric diets and counteracted by low-calorie diets. In principle, what favors anabolism will promote the inflammatory processes, while what favors catabolism will contrast them (Figure 4).

How Dietary Factors Influence Composition and Biodiversity of Gut Microbiota and Alter Host–Microbiota Relationship

The Link Between Lifestyle, Dietary Habits, and Gut Microbiota Composition

The composition of the intestinal microflora is highly individual and is influenced by many factors such as diet, physical activity, stress, medications, age, and so forth. Each of us has a unique set of at least 100 to 150 species of bacteria.

An easy way to discuss about the effect of food and lifestyle on gut microflora is to restrict the overview to only two dominant bacterial divisions—the Bacteroidetes and the Firmicutes—accounting for about 90% of the total, as it has been shown that the ratio Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes (B/F) is influenced by long-term dietary habits (Cani and Delzenne, 2009; Wu et al., 2011; Lozupone et al., 2012; Tremaroli and Bäckhed, 2012; Panda et al., 2014).

A comparative study of De Filippo et al. (2010) in children from Florence and from Burkina Faso in Africa showed that long-term dietary habits have significant effects on human gut microbiota.

In this study, the Burkina Faso diet was based on the consumption of plant polysaccharides such as millet and sorghum (10 g fibers/day and 662–992 kcal/day), whereas the diet of Italian children was Western style, based on proteins, animal fat, sugar-sweetened drinks, and refined carbohydrates (5.6 g fibers/day and 1,068–1,512 kcal/day). Analysis of fecal samples in the children from Africa showed the prevalence of the Bacteroidetes (73%)—mainly Prevotella and Xylanibacter—and low levels of Firmicutes (12%). On the contrary, a prevalence of Firmicutes (51%) over the Bacteroidetes (27%) was observed in Italian children, but the Bacteroidetes shifted from Prevotella and Xylanibacter to Bacteroides. These latter are usually selected among the Bacteroidetes because they can use also simple sugars in addition to complex glycans, and simple sugars are normal components of Western diets.

In conclusion, the B/F ratio increases in association with a diet rich in complex carbohydrates (nondigestible by our enzymes) because the symbiotic and usually nonharmful Bacteroidetes, such as Prevotella and Xylani bacter, love to have complex glycans to eat. Bacteria consuming complex glycans produce butyrate, which down regulate the activation of proinflammatory NF-kB (Figure 3).

Conversely, Western, energy-dense diets change the gut microbiota profile and increase the population of Firmicutes (including the Mollicutes), more suited to extract and harvest energy, but often pathogenic (Moschen et al., 2012).

The Link Between Dysbiotic Gut Microbiota and Chronic Inflammation

In a dysbiotic gut microbiota, the B/F ratio is low and the possibly pathogenic Firmicutes prevail over Bacteroidetes (Figure 5). The failure of microbial balance and the decrease of biodiversity occurring in dysbiosis lead to the disruption of the complex interplay between the microbiota and its host and contribute to low-grade endotossemia, and chronic intestinal and systemic inflammation. With the onset of systemic inflammation, the risk of chronic inflammatory and immune-mediated diseases increases (Tilg et al., 2009; Brown et al., 2012; Maynard et al., 2012).

Actually, in the presence of a dysbiotic microbiota, gut endotoxin/lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is increased, regulatory T cells (Treg) are defective, and the aryl hydrocarbon receptors and proinflammatory Th17 cells are activated (Cani et al., 2008; Veldhoen et al., 2008).

LPS leads to the dysfunction of the mucosal barrier and affects other tissues when its plasma level increases above 200 pg/ml serum. The increased gut permeability due to the dysbiotic gut microbiota may be exemplified by the passage of IgA and IgG antibodies against gluten and gliadin, also observed in MS patients (Reichelt and Jensen, 2004).

The Link Between Dysbiotic Gut Microbiota and MS

In our previous work, we have proposed that the model linking microbiota alteration—due to Western diet and lifestyle—and the failure of the correct communication between the microbiota and the intestine, leading to low-grade endotoxemia and systemic autoimmune inflammation, might be valid also for the pathogenesis of MS (Fernández et al., 2012; Riccio, 2011). In fact, MS shares with other chronic inflammatory diseases common mechanisms, all probably based on the persistence of low-grade endotoxemia related to wrong lifestyle and dietary habits together with a latent dysbiosis. Moreover, the existence of a gut microbiota-brain axis, which is now more than an emerging concept, suggests that intervention on gut microbiota may be a fruitful strategy for future treatment of complex CNS disorders (Cryan and Dinan, 2012).

The possible direct link between gut microbiota and MS has been shown experimentally by Berer et al. (2011). Using transgenic mice, Berer et al. have shown that gut commensal bacteria can trigger a relapsing-remitting autoimmune disease driven by myelin-specific CD4+ T cells and demyelination, given the availability of MOG—the autoantigen myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. In another study, it was shown that antibiotic treatment directed to alter gut microflora suppresses experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE; Yokote et al., 2008).

These findings suggest that gut microbiota may play a crucial role in the starting phase of MS and may also predispose host susceptibility to other CNS autoimmune diseases as well as to neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, depression, anxiety, and stress. A new concept of gut microbiota-brain axis is emerging (Wang and Kasper, 2014).

On these grounds, understanding the role of gut microbiota in health and disease can lay the foundation to treat chronic diseases by modifying the composition of gut microbiota through the choice of a correct lifestyle, including dietary habits. Moreover, direct manipulation of the gut microbiota may improve adaptive immune response and reduce inflammatory secretions. For example, because a specific role of intestinal Th17 cells has been suggested in MS immunopathology (Sie et al., 2014), promoting Treg cell differentiation and reducing pathogenic Th17 cells might prevent recurrence of autoimmunity in MS patients (Issazadeh-Navikas et al., 2012).

On these grounds, the discovery that the defect of the Treg/Th17 balance observed in MS models is also present in MS patients, could have important clinical implications, as this defect can be modulated by changes in the microbiota composition, which in turn is modulated by dietary changes (David et al., 2014).

Proinflammatory Dietary Factors

The components of the diet whose intake must be controlled to avoid the rise of inflammatory processes in MS, as well as in other chronic inflammatory diseases, are as follows:

  • Saturated fatty acids of animal origin;
  • Unsaturated fatty acids in the trans configuration (hydrogenated fatty acids);
  • Red meat;
  • Sweetened drinks, and in general hypercaloric diets rich in refined (low-fiber) carbohydrates, in addition to animal fat;
  • Increased dietary salt intake;
  • Cow’s milk proteins of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM proteins).

Fat of Animal Origin

Saturated fatty acids of animal origin, which are found in foods such as whole milk, butter, cheese, meat, and sausages, are the components of the diet taken into account more frequently for their deleterious influence on the course of MS.

In 1950, Swank suggested that the consumption of saturated animal fat is directly correlated with frequency of MS, but a link between restricted intake of animal fat and remission of MS was reported only in 2003 (Swank and Goodwin, 2003). According to Swank and Goodwin, high-fat diets lead to the synthesis of storage lipids and cholesterol and cause a decrease of membrane fluidity and possible obstruction of capillaries, and the onset or increase of inflammation.

Other more recent studies indicate that the action of saturated fat is controlled at the transcriptional level and influence both gene expression, cell metabolism, development, and differentiation of cells. More in general, the assumption of animal fat is often linked to a high-calorie intake, which is on its own a detrimental factor for many chronic inflammatory diseases. Finally, as described later in this article, an excess of saturated animal fat leads to a dysbiotic intestinal microbiota, dysfunction of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation and represents a possible cause of some human chronic disorders.

Trans Fatty Acids

Trans fatty acids (TFAs) are unsaturated fatty acids that contain at least one nonconjugated double bond in the trans configuration (Bhardwaj et al., 2011).

As products of partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils, they were introduced in the 1960s to replace animal fat, but only much later it was found that they have the same deleterious effect on the metabolism and, as the saturated fatty acids, increase the levels of cholesterol and promote the formation of abdominal fat and weight gain. TFAs intake was found to be positively associated with gut inflammation and the upregulation of proinflammatory citokines in Th17 cell polarization (Okada et al., 2013). Moreover, TFAs interfere with the metabolism of natural unsaturated fatty acids, which have the cis configuration.

TFAs are found in margarine and other treated (hydrogenated) vegetal fat, in meat and dietary products from ruminants and in snacks. They may be present also in French fries and other fried food, as they are also formed in the frying.

Red Meat

Red meat contains more iron heme than white meat. The iron is easily nitrosylated and this facilitates the formation of endogenous nitroso-compounds (NOCs; Joosen et al., 2010). Red meat intake shows indeed a dose–response relation with NOCs formation, whereas there is no such relation for white meat. NOCs are mutagenic: induce nitrosylation and DNA damage. Processed (nitrite-preserved) red meat increases the risk. Heterocyclic amines are formed during cooking of meat at high temperatures, but this is not specific for red meat (Joosen et al., 2010).

Abnormal iron deposits have been found at the sites of inflammation in MS (Williams et al., 2012) and consumption of red meat is associated with higher levels of γ-GT and hs-CRP (Montonen et al., 2013).

Noteworthy, we do not have N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), a major sialic acid, because an inactivating mutation in the CMAH gene eliminated its expression in humans. Metabolic incorporation of Neu5Gc from dietary sources—particularly red meat and milk products—can create problems, as humans have circulating anti-Neu5Gc antibodies and this implies the possible association with chronic inflammation (Padler-Karavani et al., 2008).

Finally, meat contains arachidonic acid (the omega-6 (n-6) PUFA, which is the precursor of proinflammatory eicosanoids [prostaglandins, thromboxanes, and leukotrienes]) and activates the Th17 pathway (Stenson, 2014).

High Intake of Sugar and Low Intake of Fiber

The high intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and refined cereals, with low fiber content, increases rapidly the number of calories and glucose level. The subsequent increase of insulin production upregulates the biosynthetic pathways and inter alia the production of arachidonic acid and its proinflammatory derivatives.

Increased Dietary Salt Intake

Increased dietary salt intake might be an environmental risk factor for the development of autoimmune diseases, as it has been found that it can induce pathogenic Th17 cells and related proinflammatory cytokines in EAE (Kleinewietfeld et al., 2013; Wu et al., 2013). Th17 cells have been involved in the development of MS.

Cow’s Milk Fat and the Proteins of the Milk Fat Globule Membrane

Milk fat is dispersed in a homogeneous way and protected from oxidation, thanks to a membrane made of lipids and particular proteins called proteins of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM; Riccio, 2004). These proteins, which account for only 1% of milk proteins, have an informational rather than a nutritional value. In human lactation, they are needed for the correct formation of the digestive, nervous, and immune systems in infants. This flow of information is obviously not relevant, or not required at all, in adulthood and, as well, in the case of cow’s milk taken for human nutrition. In adult age, MFGM proteins of cow’s milk no longer have an informational role and may be eliminated from the diet together with milk fat.

The removal of MFGM proteins from whole cow’s milk is particularly relevant in the case of MS. The most representative MFGM protein (40% of total MFGM proteins), butyrophilin (BTN), is indeed suspected to have a role in MS, as it is very similar to MOG, one of the candidate autoantigen in MS. BTN and MOG share the same behavior in MS experimental models, and MOG/BTN cross-reactive antibodies have been found in MS, in autism and in coronary heart disease (CHD; Riccio, 2004). On these grounds, the patient with MS should avoid the intake of whole cow’s milk and prefer skimmed milk, which, in addition, has no animal fat.

Another point of view is that of Swanson et al. (2013). They have found that BTN or BTN-like molecules might have a regulatory role in immunity and therefore they suggest that BTN or BTN-like molecules could be useful to induce Treg development.

Hypercaloric Diets and Postprandial Inflammation

After each meal, we may experience a transient and moderate oxidative stress and a moderate inflammatory response depending on type and quantity of food. Dietary habits based on a frequent and persistent exposure to meals with high intake of salt/animal fat and trans fat/sugar-sweetened drinks stresses our immune/metabolic system and the subsequent possible failure of homeostasis may lead to immune and metabolic disorders of diverse nature.

Taken together, the diet-dependent stress might be due to following reasons: (a) calorie intake: the higher the calories, the more the oxidative stress induced; (b) glycemic load of a meal: acute postprandial glycemic peaks may induce a release of insulin much higher than necessary; (c) lipid pattern: saturated animal fat, trans fatty acids, and omega-6 (n-6) long-chain PUFA promote postprandial inflammation. As reported in the following sections, postprandial inflammation is attenuated or suppressed by n-3 PUFA and polyphenols, calorie restriction, and physical exercise.

Anti-Inflammatory Natural Bioactive Compounds: Useful to Tackle MS and Prevent Relapses?

Specific bioactive dietary molecules are able to counteract the effects of pathogenic microbial agents and downregulate the expression of inflammatory molecules. Among them, the most important compounds are the polyphenols and carotenoids from vegetables, n-3 PUFA from fish, vitamins D and A, thiol compounds such as lipoic acid, and oligoelements such as selenium and magnesium.

Most of the above-mentioned compounds, with exception of PUFA, which are not antioxidant, are known for their antioxidant properties. The rationale for the use of antioxidants in MS is based on the observation that oxidative stress is one of the most important components of the inflammatory process leading to degradation of myelin and axonal damage. However, it is now known that dietary antioxidants have additional biological properties going far beyond the simple antioxidant activity. Indeed, they are able to counteract the negative effects of microbial agents and saturated or trans fatty acids, downregulating the expression of proinflammatory molecules, oxidative stress, and angiogenesis.

Polyphenols

All polyphenols—which are present in vegetables, cereals, legumes, spices, herbs, fruits, wine, fruit juices, tea, and coffee—have anti-inflammatory, immune-modulatory, anti-angiogenic, and antiviral properties and stimulate the catabolic pathways (Gupta et al., 2014; Wang et al., 2014). They are found in plants in the form of glycosides, esters, or polymers, too large to enter the intestinal membrane. Aglycons released from gut microbiota are conjugated to glucuronides and sulfates in intestine and liver. Their solubility and bioavailability are very poor (µM; Visioli et al., 2011).

From a structural point of view, polyphenols include flavonoids and nonflavonoids molecules (Bravo, 1998). The most important flavonoids are quercetin (onions, apples, citrus fruit, and wine; Min et al., 2007; Sternberg et al., 2008), catechins (green tea; Friedman, 2007), and daidzein and genistein (soy; Castro et al., 2013; Zhou et al., 2014). The most important nonflavonoids are resveratrol (chocolate, peanuts, berries, black grapes, and red wine; Das and Das, 2007; Cheng et al., 2009; Shakibaei et al., 2009), curcumin (spice turmeric of ginger family, curry; Prasad et al., 2014), and hydroxytyrosol (olive oil; Hu et al., 2014).

It has been found that the anti-inflammatory effect of polyphenols in vitro may depend on their chemical structure (Liuzzi et al., 2011). Thus, a mixture of flavonoids and nonflavonoids may be more effective than supplementation with only one polyphenol.

Two examples of the most studied polyphenols are quercetin and resveratrol. Quercetin is present mainly as a glucoside. Most of its effects are additive to those of interferon-β. Quercetin is not toxic, but its oxidation product, quercetin quinone, is very reactive toward the SH groups of proteins and glutathione and may be toxic (Boots et al., 2008). Addition of lipoic acid or N-acetylcysteine can limit the toxic effects.

Resveratrol is glucuronated in the liver and absorbed in this form mainly in the duodenum but only in very limited amount. Depending on its concentration, resveratrol can induce the death of a wide variety of cells by necrosis or apoptosis. In this regard, it is commonly accepted that resveratrol has neuroprotective effects; however, it has been also reported that it can exacerbate experimental MS-like diseases (Sato et al., 2013). These discrepancies can be attributed to the different concentrations used in vitro or bioavailable in vivo, as resveratrol has opposite effects at concentrations of 10−5 M (proliferation of human mesenchimal cells) and 10−4 M (inhibition of proliferation). In our experience, resveratrol has a neurotrophic effect on cortical neurons in culture only at very low concentration, whereas at higher concentration, it may have toxic effect. But in the case of oxidative stress, resveratrol has neuroprotective properties also at the higher concentrations.

Vitamin D, Vitamin A, Carotenoids, Other Vitamins, and Oligoelements

Other compounds and elements that may be useful as supplements in MS are the vitamins D, A, E, C, B12 (Mastronardi et al., 2004), and niacin (Penberthy and Tsunoda, 2009), and oligoelements such as selenium (Boosalis, 2008) and magnesium (Galland, 2010).

Vitamin D has immune-modulatory roles and represents the most promising dietary molecule for the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases such as MS (Smolders et al., 2008; Pierrot-Deseilligny, 2009; Cantorna, 2012; Ascherio et al., 2014). As already mentioned, it is generally believed that the special geographical distribution of MS in the world can also be attributed to the reduced availability of vitamin D3, due to insufficient exposure to sunlight in some countries, and the lack of active vitamin D may be another possible cause of environmental origin of MS. However, low levels of active vitamin D may be due also to its altered metabolism or function not only to the exposure to sunlight. In fact, the failure of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) supplementation to show beneficial effects on body weight or on the course of inflammatory diseases may be due to the persistence of its deficiency despite its administration.

Vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol), formed after exposure to sunshine, is hydroxylated in the liver to 25-(OH) D3 (calcidiol) by the P450 enzymes CYP27A1 or CYP2R1, and subsequently activated in the kidney by CYP27B1 to 1α, 25-(OH)2 D3 (calcitriol). This latter, the active form of vitamin D, is inactivated by CYP24A1 to 1α, 24,25-(OH)3 D3 (calcitroic acid). This means that the levels of active vitamin D depend on the relative rates of its synthesis via CYP27B1 and its modifications via CYP24A1 (Schuster, 2011). High CYP24A1 expression, induced by endogenous compounds and xenobiotics, might lead to low levels of vitamin D and cause or enhance chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. On these grounds, it is important to follow up the level of vitamin D in the course of vitamin D administration. If vitamin D levels remain low, the expression of CYP24A1 mRNA should be examined, and determination of CYP27B1 and CYP24A1 activities and their inhibition should be tested (Chiellini et al., 2012, Kósa et al., 2013).

Another important aspect regards the VDR. The active metabolite of vitamin D—1α, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D—binds to VDR, and the complex VDR-D controls the expression of several genes involved in processes of potential relevance to chronic diseases. As represented in Figures 2 and and3,3, the VDR-D complex competes with ligand-activated PPARs or LXRs for the binding to RA-RXR. The heterodimeric complexes bind to the proinflammatory transcription factor NFkB and downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules. In this context, when evaluating the effectiveness of vitamin D supplementation in the course of MS, one should consider the eventual polymorphisms affecting the VDR, which has been recently associated with obesity, inflammation, and alterations of gut permeability (Al-Daghri et al., 2014).

Moreover, the finding that that VDR-D activate the Sirtuin SIRT-1 (An et al., 2010; Polidoro et al., 2013) suggests that vitamin D has an influence also on cell metabolism and therefore may have properties similar to those of many other natural dietary supplements: upregulate oxidative metabolism and downregulate inflammation.

Finally, it should be considered that there are differences between data in humans and experimental models. Actually, in humans, unlike in mice, obesity is associated with poor vitamin D status (Bouillon et al., 2014).

Among the carotenoids, the most important is lycopene (tomato, water melon, and pink grape fruit; Rao and Rao, 2007). Besides to be a very strong antioxidant, lycopene can give beta-carotene and retinoic acid, and the latter can activate the RXR receptor (Figure 2). Although higher intakes of dietary carotenoids, vitamin C, and vitamin E did not reduce the risk of MS in women (Zhang et al., 2001), the relevance of lycopene and vitamin A against inflammation cannot be disregarded.

Omega-3 (n-3) Essential Fatty Acids and Poly-Unsaturated Fatty Acids from Vegetables, Seafood, and Fish Oil

n-3 essential fatty acids (EFA) and PUFA represent a valid alternative to saturated fatty acids of animal origin.

Vegetable and vegetable oils contain the essential fatty acids linoleic acid (n-6) and linolenic acid (n-3). n-6 and n-3 fatty acids have opposite effects and their presence in the diet should be equivalent (Schmitz and Ecker, 2008). However, in Western diets, the ratio n-6/n-3 is increased from 6 to 15 times and this leads to a higher incidence of cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. In fact, the linoleic acid leads to the formation of arachidonic acid (20:4), the precursor of the proinflammatory eicosanoids prostaglandins-2, leukotrienes-4, and thromboxanes-2. The synthesis of these eicosanoids is favored by insulin, and inhibited by aspirin, as well as by the n-3 long-chain PUFA EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), which derive from n-3 linolenic acid.

Both DHA and EPA are found in seafood and fish oil. Both show remarkable anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic, and immune-modulatory activities, comparable with those of statins (Calder, 2006; Farooqui et al., 2007). n-3 PUFA inhibit inflammatory processes and the synthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol, and instead they stimulate the oxidation of fatty acids. On this basis, in chronic inflammatory diseases such as MS, n-3 essential fatty acids (EFA) and n-3 PUFA should prevail in the diet over the n-6 fatty acids. It is interesting to note that DHA is present in high concentrations in the brain and its levels decrease in patients with MS.

In cultured microglial cells activated by LPS, fish oil is as effective as interferon-β in inhibiting the expression of MMP-9 (gelatinase B), an important mediator of neuro-inflammation (Liuzzi et al., 2004, 2007). Moreover, n-3 PUFA significantly decreased MMP-9 levels in few clinical trials, indicating that n-3 PUFA may represent a good complementary treatment in the course of MS (Weinstock-Guttman et al., 2005; Mehta et al., 2009; Shinto et al., 2009). Fish oil has been also found to improve motor performances in healthy rat pups (Coluccia et al., 2009).

n-3 PUFA act in synergy with aspirin on AMPK and COX enzymes but with different mechanisms. Noteworthy, in the presence of aspirin, EPA and DHA form new anti-inflammatory bioactive molecules called resolvins, protectins, and maresins, which are able to reduce cellular inflammation and inflammatory pain (Xu et al., 2010; Hong and Lu, 2013; Serhan and Chiang, 2013). This may be a relevant aspect related to the nutritional intervention in MS. Indeed, the inflammatory processes associated to MS could be also due to the low ratio omega-3 (anti-inflammatory)/omega 6 (inflammatory) PUFA and thereby to the low production of adequate amounts of resolution-inducing molecules lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins that suppress inflammation. Hence, administration of omega-3 PUFA together with aspirin or directly of lipoxins, resolvins, and protectins may form a new approach in the prevention and treatment of MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases. Furthermore, other anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic eicosanoids can also be produced by the P450 CYP enzymes from EPA and DHA (Yanai et al., 2014). In this context, it should be taken into consideration that statins may interfere negatively with the metabolism of n-3 and n-6, as they can decrease the n-3/n-6 ratio. Thus, treatment with statins should be associated with n-3 PUFA supplementation (Harris et al., 2004).

Seeds oils, from sunflower, corn, soybean, and sesame, contain more n-6 fatty acids than n-3 fatty acids and therefore their assumption should be limited in MS, in order to limit the level of proinflammatory eicosanoid production. On the other hand, coconut oil has a high content of saturated fatty acids. Among vegetable oils, olive oil should be preferred for the good ratio between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, and because it contains the antioxidant hydroxytyrosol.

Thiolic compounds as Dietary Supplements

Compounds containing thiol groups (–SH) such as α-lipoic acid (ALA), glutathione, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) should be taken into consideration as possible dietary supplements to be used for the complementary treatment of MS.

As polyphenols, ALA (Salinthone et al., 2008; green plants and animal foods) has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. ALA stabilizes the integrity of the BBB and stimulates the production of cAMP and the activity of protein kinase A. Also NAC might be useful in neurological disorders. It passes through the BBB and protects from inflammation (Bavarsad Shahripour et al., 2014).

The Mediterranean Diet

A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of intervention trials provide evidence that Mediterranean diet patterns reduce inflammation and cardiovascular mortality risk and improves endothelial functions (Schwingshackl and Hoffmann, 2014). These findings are as much encouraging as you think that the true Mediterranean diet is a little different from the one currently described.

It is generally agreed that the Mediterranean diet is based on consumption of extra-virgin olive oil, unrefined cereals, legumes, diverse vegetables (in particular tomatoes) and fruits, dairy products (mostly as pecorino cheese, ricotta, mozzarella, and yogurt), fish and fishery products, and low consumption of animal fat and meat. However, currently, the Mediterranean diet tends to a high consumption of pasta and bread, which means a high intake of gluten.

Once, in true Mediterranean diet, in Southern Italy, meat was eaten two or at most three times a week, only olive oil was used for cooking (extra-virgin quality and the most possible raw), but notably the intake of gluten was about half compared with the current intake. The pasta was eaten with the classic home-made tomato sauce, but in alternative, it was most often mixed with other gluten-free foods. The most common recipes were pasta and potatoes; pasta with either green beans, or artichokes, zucchini, eggplant, turnips, or cabbage; pasta with a mix of vegetables and legumes (minestrone: vegetable soup); and pasta with chickpeas, beans, or lentils. The sugar-sweetened drinks of today were not known. A high assumption of gluten-rich food may lead to nonceliac asymptomatic gluten sensitivity, mucosal intestinal damage, changes in gut microbiota, and low-grade intestinal inflammation. In conclusion, the Mediterranean diet is good, but the intake of gluten must be limited and must be whole grains.

Inflammatory and Anti-Inflammatory Lifestyle

Smoking (Proinflammatory)

Only a few studies have been carried out on the impact of smoking on the course of MS and results are conflicting, perhaps because its effects are difficult to ascertain and enucleate from other factors. Weiland et al. (2014) have found no association between smoking and relapse rate or disease activity, but do not exclude that smokers might have a significantly lower health-related quality of life than non-smokers, whereas Manouchehrinia et al. (2013) found that smoking is associated with more severe disease.

However, as it is shown in Figure 2, it can be expected that cigarette smoke may worsen the course of MS, as it may inhibit the anti-inflammatory activity of Sirtuins (Caito et al., 2010). The oxidative and carbonyl stress induced by cigarette smoke can be reversed by resveratrol (Liu et al., 2014).

Alcohol Consumption (Proinflammatory)

Recent studies shows that alcohol (beer, wine, or liquor) consumption is not associated to MS risk (Massa et al., 2013; Hedström et al., 2014). However, as also shown in Figure 2, alcohol may inhibit the Sirtuin SIRT1 and activate the transcriptional activity of SREBP-1c (You et al., 2008), thus promoting the biosynthesis of lipids and inflammation at the expense of oxidative metabolism.

There are other two aspects of ethanol that should be considered. First, the metabolism of ethanol converts a large number of NAD+ molecules to NADH, limiting the availability of NAD+ required for the activity of Sirtuins. Second, as a substrate of the P450 enzymes, ethanol can interfere with the metabolism of drugs, which are transformed by the same enzymes. The result may be the prolongation and the enhancement of drug action. Altogether, alcohol should be considered as a molecule that interferes with the normal metabolism and facilitates the inflammatory process, complicating the possibility of improving the wellbeing of the patient.

Calorie Restriction (Anti-Inflammatory)

High-calorie intake and a meal rich in refined carbohydrates and sugar increase insulin level and favors biosynthesis, including the production of proinflammatory molecules and the production of free radicals. Calorie restriction, obtained by decreasing food intake or by intermittent fasting (one day and the other not), upregulates the level of SIRT1 (Zhang et al., 2011), increases the level of AMP and upregulates AMPK, increases adiponectin levels and upregulate or activate its receptors (Lee and Kwak, 2014), and downregulates oxidative damage, lymphocyte activation, and the progression of experimental models of MS (Piccio et al., 2008, 2013). The effects of calorie restriction can be mimicked by agonists (resveratrol and other polyphenols), acting on the same targets (SIRT1, AMPK).

Physical Exercise (Anti-Inflammatory)

Physical exercise is now an almost accepted practice also for MS patients and is commonly applied in order to decrease the symptoms of chronic fatigue and prevent or slow the onset of disability. However, the importance of physical exercise goes beyond that of simple muscle activity and should be rather considered in a holistic context in which diet, exercise, therapy, and social interchange, all play a role for the wellness of MS patients (Gacias and Casaccia, 2013).

Dietary control and exercise practice have been proposed by the WHO (2010) to attenuate or prevent human chronic diseases.

From a molecular point of view, physical exercise exerts its beneficial effect by acting on the protein kinase AMPK axis and the AMPK–Sirtuins–PPAR-δ network, upregulating oxidative metabolism and downregulating biosynthetic pathways and inflammation (Narkar et al., 2008). As AMPK has a key role in energy balance, it is important to mention its agonists. Resveratrol and AMPK agonists such as metformin, a drug used in type 2 diabetes, can mimic or enhance the effect of physical activity and are effective in experimental encephalitis (Nath et al., 2009).

Physical exercise influences the quality of life and may stimulate the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines (Florindo, 2014). Furthermore, physical exercise lowers plasma levels of leptin and reduces gene expression of leptin receptors in the liver (Yasari et al., 2009), while increasing adiponectin levels and adiponectin receptors activity (Lee and Kwak, 2014).

The association of physical exercise with calorie restriction leads to a significant reduction of inflammatory markers (Reed et al., 2010).

Recent studies carried on adult C57BL/6 J male mice have shown that exercise stimulate brain mitochondrial activity, potentiate neuroplasticity, and is associated to mood improvement, as it decrease anxiety-like behaviors in the open field and exert antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test (Aguiar et al., 2014). Other studies performed on rats showed that exercise can alter the composition and diversity of gut bacteria (Petriz et al., 2014).

On these grounds, MS patients should practice mild physical exercise (brisk walking, swimming, or even dancing), if possible in the course of a rehabilitation program.

Nutritional Clinical Trials in MS So Far

Unfortunately, nutritional clinical trials in MS are only very few. Some of them were based on diets low in saturated fat, either without supplements (Swank and Goodwin, 2003) or with omega-3 fat supplements (Nordvik et al., 2000; Weinstock-Guttman et al., 2005). Other clinical trials were based on the administration of single dietary supplements only: either vitamin D, or fish oil (n-3 PUFA), or lipoic acid. Clinical trials with single polyphenols were performed only in cancer. Dietary supplements have never been used together and have never been associated with dietary prescription.

Taken together, clinical attempts to clarify the role of nutrition in MS were considered only promising of poor quality or with no clear results (Farinotti et al., 2007, 2012). In particular, as reported by Farinotti et al. in their Cochrane review (2012), supplements such as n-3 PUFA seem to have no major effect on the main clinical outcome in MS, but they may reduce the frequency of relapses over 2 years. Data available were considered to be insufficient or of uncertain quality to assess a real effect from PUFA supplementation. In some studies, slight possible benefits in relapse outcomes were found with omega-6 fatty acids, but data were characterized by the reduced validity of the endpoints. In general, trial quality was found to be poor. Studies on vitamin supplementation were not analyzed as none met the eligibility criteria, mainly due to lack of clinical outcomes. Thus, evidence on the benefits and risks of vitamin supplementation and antioxidant supplements in MS is lacking.

Suggestions for a Nutritional Intervention in MS: The Choice of Diet and Dietary Supplements

At the end, the goal of a nutritional intervention in MS must be the control of inflammation and this, as shown in this review, can be achieved mainly by controlling postprandial inflammation, the composition of gut microbiota and intestinal and systemic inflammation, and immunity. This can be achieved by a long-term dietary intervention, with a hypocaloric diet, prebiotics, probiotics, and dietary supplements.

As reported in this article, healthy dietary molecules, calorie restriction, and exercise are able to direct cell metabolism toward catabolism and downregulate anabolism and inflammation by interacting at different levels with specific enzymes, nuclear receptors, and transcriptional factors. Furthermore, in association with fiber, they can shift gut dysbiosis to eubiosis.

As a result, low-calorie meals (1,600–1,800 kcal) based on vegetables, whole cereals, legumes, fruit, and fish may slow down the progression of the disease and ameliorate the wellness of MS patients, whereas hypercaloric diets with high intake of salt, saturated animal fat, fried food, and sugar-sweetened drinks may lead to the onset of postprandial inflammation and systemic low-grade inflammation.

Diet should be integrated with prebiotics, probiotics, specific vitamins (D, A, B12, and nicotinic acid), oligoelements (magnesium and selenium), and dietary supplements such as polyphenols, n-3 PUFA, and lipoic acid.

Prebiotics for MS should include inulin, bran, lactosucrose, and oligofructose, preferential nutrients for colonocytes and capable to inactivate NF-kB. Probiotics, such as lactococcus lactis, bifidobacterium lactis, and clostridium butyricum, which can improve the intestinal microbial balance, can be used to change the composition of colonic microbiota. The combination of prebiotics and probiotics is highly recommended. Bowel functions and weight should always be under control.

A more drastic therapeutic approach aimed to restore gut eubiosis and downregulate inflammation may be represented by fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT; Smits et al., 2013). The method seems to be very effective but still primitive, not completely safe, and in a way also disgusting. The field should move beyond fecal transplants, identify the organisms that may be essential for a particular condition, and provide those organisms in a much simpler fashion than FMT (“Critical Views in Gastroenterology & Hepatology,” 2014).

Dietary supplements, with the only exception of omega-3 PUFA, which are normal constituents of our body, are useful at the beginning of the nutritional intervention, or in the course of relapses, to facilitate the recovery of a healthy condition, but their use should be restricted to only a limited period of time (3–4 months). This is particularly valid for the polyphenols. Polyphenols are not well-known molecules with regard to their bioavailability and their biological effects and special precautions should be used when supplementing the diet with them. On one hand, they can downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules in the course of inflammatory processes; on the other hand, they can stimulate cell activity in resting cells, but a persistent stimulation can induce the apoptosis of healthy cells. Taken together, these considerations suggest that administration of purified polyphenols should be performed on the basis of preliminary clinical trials to test their effectiveness as dietary supplements and to determine their long-term safety and the right dosage.

In general, a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements decreases the biosynthesis of proinflammatory compounds and therewith makes more effective the use of immune-modulatory drugs, and eventually might limit their possible adverse effects, alleviate the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome, and favor patient wellness. However, diet and dietary supplements should not be treated as drugs and as a substitute of therapy. Similarly, proinflammatory food is not toxic and there is no need to exclude it completely. You can eat a nice steak or fried food without risk or guilt, if you are in a basically healthy condition. What hurts are the wrong eating habits in the long run.

Dr Jimenez White Coat

Multiple sclerosis, or MS, is a chronic, progressive disease involving damage to the myelin sheaths of nerve cells. The epidemiology of MS suggests that various factors are often involved in the clinical expression of the health issue. However, numerous research studies have primarily evaluated the role of diet on the development of multiple sclerosis. For several years, healthcare professionals believed there was a correlation between the consumption of dairy in patients with multiple sclerosis. According to various research studies, a significant correlation between cow milk and the prevalence of multiple sclerosis was found, suggesting a possible role of dairy products in the multifactorial etiology of MS. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T.

Conclusions

So, at first glance, MS does not seem to have any of the characteristics of chronic inflammatory diseases, which could be related to wrong dietary habits and lifestyle, or even to a dysbiotic gut microbiota. There is apparently nothing in an exacerbation of the disease that may be linked to food or the state of the intestinal microbiota. In fact, when we began our studies on the impact of nutrition on MS, there was not even the slightest clue that there could exist a real link between them, and the idea of the involvement of gut microbiota in MS was considered only very speculative. To date, the idea that dietary habits might influence the course of MS is still struggling to establish itself. Not so in cardiovascular diseases and other chronic inflammatory conditions, in which the influence of dietary habits is almost accepted, and not even in cancer, which is increasingly considered as a metabolic disorder (Seyfried et al., 2014).

At present, MS therapy is not associated to any particular diet, probably due to lack of information on the effects of nutrition on the disease. However, the majority of patients with MS is looking for complementary and alternative treatments (CAM), and in particular is trying to change dietary habits, almost without the advice of the physician (Schwarz et al., 2008; Leong et al., 2009). A recent study based on data provided by MS patients in response to a questionnaire on their dietary habits seems to support a significant association of healthy dietary habits with better physical and mental health-related quality of life and a lower level of disability (Hadgkiss et al., 2014). These data reinforce the idea of the need for randomized controlled trials of nutritional intervention for people with MS. It should be emphasized that nutritional treatments should be complementary, but not alternative to therapy, be part of a holistic approach and performed under medical control.

As there are no data available from clinical trials yet, our work is aimed to rationalize dietary choices on the basis of known and established effects of dietary factors and lifestyle at the molecular level. Data reported in Figure 2 are obviously not complete but may be useful to provide guidelines for nutritional interventions. In principle, proinflammatory food upregulate the biosynthetic and inflammatory pathways, as shown on the right and at the bottom of Figure 2, whereas anti-inflammatory food upregulates oxidative metabolism and downregulates anabolism and inflammation.

As shown in this article, the finding that calorie restriction, exercise, and particular dietary factors can influence the degree of inflammatory responses by acting on both cellular metabolism (Figure 2) and composition of gut microbiota (Figure 5), suggests that an appropriate nutritional intervention may ameliorate the course of the disease and may be therefore taken in consideration as a possible complementary treatment in MS. As inflammation is present in both RRMS and PPMS, nutritional advices are indicated for both forms of the disease. This is particularly important in the case of PPMS, for which no cure is presently available. Conversely, as specific dietary habits may be detrimental and may promote a chronic state of low-grade inflammation, a wrong diet may be considered a possible contributory cause of relapses in MS.

Taken together, we have now a better knowledge of the possible influence of dietary factors on cell metabolism and gut microbiota, and on their possible effects on the disease, but, clearly, we are only just beginning to understand the role of nutrition and gut microbiota in MS and much work remains in terms of understanding the nature of the interactions of gut microbiota with the host’s immune system, especially at sites distal to the intestine.

On these grounds, future prospects in MS research should regard the following points: (a) assess gut microbiota composition; (b) evaluate defects in intestinal immune system; (c) clarify the role of polyphenols and vitamin D metabolism; (d) study the impact of dietary factors, herbs, and drugs on AMPK, Sirtuins, PPAR, or directly on NF-kB. Noteworthy, some drugs used to treat type II diabetes, such as the PPAR-γ agonists thiazolidinediones (Bernardo et al., 2009), and the AMPK agonist metformin (Nath et al., 2009) have anti-inflammatory effects comparable with those of anti-inflammatory dietary factors; (e) define possible interferences between dietary supplements and MS drugs; (f) promote a campaign aimed to educate about the importance to follow a healthy diet during therapy, for instance, encouraging patients to include fiber or complex carbohydrates in their diet, supplementing with probiotics, choosing n-3 fats over proinflammatory n-6 fats, and limiting meat and animal fat consumption. The choice of good recipes, such as those described by Mollie Katzen (2013), can make the diet more acceptable.

Overall, immune-modulatory conventional MS therapies have been almost successful; however, drugs that can protect and favor repair mechanisms are still missing. We can decide to help people stay healthy by providing nutritional guidance and physical activity opportunities. For the moment, there are only good prospects for improving the wellbeing of patients with MS. We are only at the beginning of the story.

Summary

As both relapsing-remitting MS and primary-progressive MS are inflammatory diseases, they can be influenced by proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory dietary habits and lifestyle through their action on cell metabolism and gut microbiota. Nutritional advice to MS patients may favor their wellness.

Declaration of Conflicting Interests

The authors declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

Funding

The authors disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: This work is supported by the Italian Foundation for Multiple Sclerosis (FISM) with grants 2007/R/15 for the Project “Healthy and Functional Foods for MS patients,” 2010/R/35 for the Project “The Molecular Basis for Nutritional Intervention in Multiple Sclerosis,” and 2014/S/2 (2014–2015) for the project “Nutritional Facts in Multiple Sclerosis: Why They Are Important and How They Should Be Managed” to P. R.

Many doctors greatly recommend that patients with multiple sclerosis, or MS, avoid dairy because various research studies have demonstrated a high correlation between MS and dairy, especially cow’s milk. This is largely due to the fact that the proteins in cow’s milk are generally targeted by the immune system of patients with multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, some proteins in cow’s milk imitate part of the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein, or MOG, the section of myelin which triggers the autoimmune response in multiple sclerosis that can trick the immune system to attack and destroy the MOG. Information referenced from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

Referenced from: Ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4342365/

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Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. The spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.  

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Keto Diet Health Benefits

Keto Diet Health Benefits

If you are currently thinking about the ketogenic diet, then you might be asking yourself, is the keto diet right for you? While you may have already heard about the benefits of the ketogenic diet, you might still be wondering about whether if it is worth it to completely change your diet to take advantage of these benefits.

The keto diet has many benefits, from weight loss and improved physical health to mental clarity and enhanced physical performance. In the following article, we will dive into the details of some of the ketogenic diet health benefits. These benefits can help with the particular health goal you may be attempting to attain.

Ketogenic Diet and Weight Loss

In comparison to low-fat dieting, a low-carb diet can deliver superior results within a shorter time period in terms of weight loss, and the management of cholesterol, and blood pressure. If you want to shed weight, the ketogenic diet plan provides the following benefits and will get you closer to attaining your objective. There can be many reasons for this, including:

  • Low-carb and ketogenic diets are more satisfying with their low carb content and higher quantities of fats and protein.
  • Going onto a low-carb diet usually makes you lose extra water weight.
  • Most individuals can undergo weight loss fairly quickly, especially within the first week of beginning a ketogenic diet.

Increased HDL Cholesterol

Together with the high consumption of saturated fats and other healthy fats, the ketogenic diet may help raise HDL cholesterol and enhance triglycerides levels. Both of these are considerably significant towards promoting heart health.

Ketogenic Diet and Physical Health

Acne

Following the ketogenic diet has been demonstrated to also be able to help reduce inflammation and lesions of the skin like those found in acne. This is believed to occur due to the effects of ketosis, or the state in which the cells use ketones instead of glucose for energy.

IBS Support

Moreover, several research studies have also associated a link between the reduced consumption of glucose, or sugar, and an improvement in symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS. As a matter of fact, one research study demonstrated that following a ketogenic diet may improve bowel movement habits and help reduce abdominal pain, improving quality of life in people with IBS.

Ketogenic Diet and Physical Performance

Balanced Energy Levels

Do not be surprised if you’re ready to stop drinking coffee every day after adapting to the keto diet. Achieving and maintaining ketosis involves benefits like no day slumps, no mood swings, and reducing changes in energy levels that you might experience otherwise.

In addition, you’ll likely find it much easier to remain longer periods of time without feeling hungry. This is what ultimately helps with weight loss, steady blood sugar levels, and extended periods of fasting, which is one of the best ways to get into ketosis.

Enhanced Workouts

Adjusting to the ketogenic diet may take time, however, once your body gets used to burning fat for fuel rather than sugar, or glucose, from carbohydrates, you will likely notice a difference in your physical performance and endurance, such as more energy and focus for workouts. This makes sense because being in ketosis “instructs” the entire human body to burn fat for fuel more efficiently.

The most important first step in case you start the ketogenic diet and notice limitations in your physical performance is to give your body some time to adapt from utilizing carbohydrates as its primary fuel to utilizing ketones as a source of energy. For individuals who participate in a lot of physical activities and exercise as well as athletes may benefit from a cyclical or targeted ketogenic diet.

Fat Loss / Muscle Gain

The amount of protein intake on a ketogenic diet makes it excellent for building muscle mass. Results might seem to come more gradually than for someone fueling their workouts but that is usually because you’re building lean mass together with fat reduction. By way of instance, when documenting a keto fast for four days, the individual gained 2.4 lbs of muscle with 1.1 lbs of fat reduction.

Ketogenic Diet and Mental Clarity

Several research studies have demonstrated that a ketogenic diet may have the ability to support mental clariy as well as help boost productivity, support better memory, and also, have positive effects in regard to moderate cognitive impairment.

Neurological Support

Early usage of the ketogenic diet has been used as a treatment for reducing seizures in people with epilepsy, especially children. Additionally, it has been shown to benefit people with Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders. This is likely because ketone bodies created through the keto diet can have neuroprotective effects.

Dr Jimenez White Coat
Weight loss is one of the most well-known advantages of the ketogenic diet, however, this nutritional plan can have many other health benefits. By reducing the consumption of carbohydrates, the cells will go into a state of ketosis and instead utilize ketones created from fats, providing a steadier supply of energy than that of glucose, or sugar. Furthermore, research studies have also demonstrated the ketogenic diet’s possible role in disease prevention, such as for people with epilepsy. Dr. Alex Jimenez D.C., C.C.S.T. Insight

The benefits of the ketogenic diet are essential, not just for weight loss, but for overall health and wellness. When you are eating more fats and proteins with fewer carbohydrates, you are more likely to end up eating fewer calories. With this, you also don’t experience a change of energy levels but instead maintain a level of energy that lets you remain focused on your everyday tasks.

Regardless of the health goal you have in mind, the ketogenic, or keto, offers many benefits to improve your quality of life. Being aware of the proper foods you should eat on the keto diet is also important. The scope of our information is limited to chiropractic and spinal health issues. To discuss the subject matter, please feel free to ask Dr. Jimenez or contact us at 915-850-0900 .

Curated by Dr. Alex Jimenez

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Additional Topic Discussion: Acute Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most prevalent causes of disability and missed days at work worldwide. Back pain attributes to the second most common reason for doctor office visits, outnumbered only by upper-respiratory infections. Approximately 80 percent of the population will experience back pain at least once throughout their life. The spine is a complex structure made up of bones, joints, ligaments, and muscles, among other soft tissues. Injuries and/or aggravated conditions, such as herniated discs, can eventually lead to symptoms of back pain. Sports injuries or automobile accident injuries are often the most frequent cause of back pain, however, sometimes the simplest of movements can have painful results. Fortunately, alternative treatment options, such as chiropractic care, can help ease back pain through the use of spinal adjustments and manual manipulations, ultimately improving pain relief.  

blog picture of cartoon paper boy

EXTRA EXTRA | IMPORTANT TOPIC: Recommended El Paso, TX Chiropractor

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